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Author Topic: How many bees on a frame of brood?  (Read 8194 times)
Tyro
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« on: February 04, 2010, 02:00:04 PM »

So, a 3lb package is said to have about 10,000 bees in it.

If you purchase a nuc - how many bees are there on a typical deep brood frame (# of bees/frame of brood)?

thanks for replies.

Mike



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lotsobees
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2010, 02:02:11 PM »

Not sure, but one also needs to account for number of bees in the form of capped brood/larvae/eggs.
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doak
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2010, 02:15:20 PM »

Don't worry about how many to the frame. Question is how many frames are covered with busy bees?
You want to house a 3 pound package in a full deep or medium.
On the other hand if you have a nuke that has all frames covered, drawn comb.etc, it's time to go to a full size box.

You should have bees continue to hatch from the nuke for almost two weeks before any start hatching from the package. If more space is not given where will these bees go? :)doak

Correction,Bees continue to hatch for nearly "4" weeks, not two. in the nuke.
Thank you., doak
« Last Edit: February 04, 2010, 02:37:16 PM by doak » Logged
Finski
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2010, 02:27:17 PM »

.1 kg = 2lb is 10 000 bees.

3 lb occupye about  5-6 frames which they can keep warm.
It helps brooding if you put extra wall into the box.
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doak
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2010, 02:43:19 PM »

Most people here in central don't try to hive package bees till in April.
The package bees are not available till then.

Finski, I don't know how your Aprils or spring compares to ours. Father north they do not hive packages until later.

But I do have a Finnish Military surplus rifle :)doak
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Finski
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2010, 03:50:51 PM »

.
We have in April mostly snow in forest.
Willows start to bloom first of May. Apple trees bloom at the end of May or first week of June.

I live at Anchorage level ( 60 latitude.)

We have no package bees. If someone byes something, get byes  5 frames nuc or a whole beehive.

But swarms act same way like packages,  execpt thet they have warmer weathers and warmer nights.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2010, 12:13:21 AM »

So, a 3lb package is said to have about 10,000 bees in it.

If you purchase a nuc - how many bees are there on a typical deep brood frame (# of bees/frame of brood)?

thanks for replies.

Mike
what one needs to remember about nucs is that you are also geting frames of brood-one frame of brood makes two frames of bees-of course the advantage is time when comparing the two -is the reason you asked  to compare the number of bees from nuc to a package for some sort of value repersantion-RDY-B



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Tyro
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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2010, 12:24:04 AM »

RDY-B,

Actually, curiosity mostly.  I am going to make up nucs this spring by purchasing frames of brood/bees from a local commercial beekeeper and then ordering queens separately (to arrive around the time I get frames).  For what I am budgeted to spend, I can make up five 3-frame nucs (which I would prefer), or three stronger 5-frame nucs. 

Since the 'standard' size for starting out a colony is a 3lb package, I was curious to know how the different sized nucs would compare (that is, does making more, 3 frame nucs have a significant disadvantage in terms of numbers of bees as compared to the standard 3lb package - or should I be safe and do all 5 frame nucs).

Mike
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Finski
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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2010, 06:19:46 AM »

RDY-B,

- or should I be safe and do all 5 frame nucs).

Mike


That is absolutly better. 3-frame nuc is too slow to grow.  5 frame nuc grows 3 times faster than 3 frame.
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CVBees
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« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2010, 08:52:13 AM »

Excellent string folks.. I am purchasing my first year bees in the form of Nuc's and I had not thought of what to look for.  Not that I am worried I am purchasing from a verified and trusted source but still good knowledge.  Nice avatar Finski.  I am a Maine Native
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2010, 11:01:32 AM »

3,742 bees on one deep frame of brood.  Wink
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2010, 12:43:59 PM »

Thank you Michael.   grin Now thats the kind of answer that my engineering mind can deal with.  Wink
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Finski
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« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2010, 01:02:14 PM »

Thank you Michael.   grin Now thats the kind of answer that my engineering mind can deal with.  Wink

What about when they swarm into blue sky just when you calculated them?

Good in math but not as good  in keeping bees in the hive  tongue
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brer
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« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2010, 09:57:28 AM »

just count the legs as they go by and divide by six. Wink
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Beaver Dam
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2010, 04:43:44 PM »

Michael are you sure? My frames must be a tad bigger than yours, or I have a better queen, my count was 3,746. Wink
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doak
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« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2010, 05:26:17 PM »

Are we counting bees or cells?  Worker or drone cells?
There would be a difference. Besides, How do you keep an accurate count with the bees moving around. Glad some ones ability is better than mine. Wouldn't even attempt to count the bees. :)doak
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Two Bees
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« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2010, 08:00:01 AM »

The bees that are hanging between the frames.............did everyone count these?   grin
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Beaver Dam
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« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2010, 10:29:54 PM »

Are we counting bees or cells?  Worker or drone cells?
There would be a difference. Besides, How do you keep an accurate count with the bees moving around. Glad some ones ability is better than mine. Wouldn't even attempt to count the bees. :)doak
[/quote


You say "FALL IN" grin
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bee-nuts
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« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2010, 07:11:37 PM »

Awesome topic.  I have wondered this myself.  You could take a pic of a frame loaded with bees, print it, divide the pic into so many sections. then count, times by sections times two, and have a good idea.  Yes there are top bottom and sides.  you can figure this out to.  You could also take a loaded frame and shake it and weigh the bees. 

Either way It is definitely a good selling/buying point to know how many bees are on a frame and in brood if you sell nucs or buy them.

However M.B. came up with the figure, Im sure it is close enough for the girls I deal with.

So how about brood then.  If a deep frame had every cell capped with worker brood on both sides, how many would that be?  I know I could figure it out but asking is easier.  LOL.
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« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2010, 08:08:13 PM »

Bee Nuts,

Is that small cell or what......?  grin
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