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Author Topic: AAAHHHH!!...Stupid condensation!  (Read 7101 times)
Finski
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« Reply #60 on: January 24, 2010, 04:55:36 AM »

Canada: Insulating Your House

Signs of Insulation Problems

In the winter

•walls cold to touch
•cold floors
•high heating costs
•uneven heating levels within building
•mold growing on walls

In the summer

•uncomfortably hot inside air
•high cooling costs
•ineffectiveness of air conditioning system
•mold growing in basement


MORE
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/maho/enefcosa/enefcosa_002.cfm


Think about beehive ventilation: In winter same ventilation as in summer
but only 1/3 of bees are heating the hive in winter

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Somerford
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« Reply #61 on: January 28, 2010, 03:04:35 PM »

I have noticed a marked improvement in reducing condensation since I started using open mesh floors all year round, and I make sure that strong colonies have both vents in the crownboard left uncovered.

I also don't put any insulation either around the exterior or on the crown board !


Overwinting in North Wiltshire, near Malmesbury, UK

regards

S
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ONTARIO BEEKEEPER
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« Reply #62 on: January 28, 2010, 04:22:09 PM »

I insulate the over top of the inner cover to cut down on condensation. I also have an upper entrance which also serves as a vent.
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Finski
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« Reply #63 on: January 29, 2010, 12:49:06 AM »

I have noticed a marked improvement in reducing condensation since I started using open mesh floors all year round, and I make sure that strong colonies have both vents in the crownboard left uncovere



That is surely too much. If you use open bottom, dont use upper ventilation.
Inner covers insulation keep heat up  inside.

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Somerford
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« Reply #64 on: January 29, 2010, 04:36:40 AM »

Fin, no, they appear to be fine. One of the main triggers of Nosema is a damp hive. My old beekeeping mentor always held that air travelling through helped the prevention of condensation. We have had quite a bad winter here already, as you know, -12 c, and they appear to be fine.

I do leave the inspection board in the bottom, so it doesn't create a massive draught though.

Next year it will be interesting re. Beehaus as the gap between the mesh and the tray is about 3cm

regards

S
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Finski
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« Reply #65 on: January 29, 2010, 06:54:08 AM »

.

Condensation is not the main issue in wintering. And too much is too much in ventilation too.

How do you live at home. -12C and windows open that moisture does not stay onto window glass.

In good old times we used 2 window glasses and during bad frost window caught moisture and make ice.
Now we use 3 glasses, and inner window is warmer and no condensation happens.

So do you add ventilation or insulation?

I am old too and you don't believe me a bit cool .... but not too old.
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Somerford
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« Reply #66 on: January 30, 2010, 09:17:05 PM »

Finski, just because we humans like warmer places to live, doesn't mean our bees do....after all they have survived the last 200 million years without our 'clever' ideas !

regards

S
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rdy-b
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« Reply #67 on: January 31, 2010, 12:49:54 AM »

depends how long your food surplus will last -cold bees need extra feed to generate heat-dont let them burn up reserves       before they can fend for themselves -some winters are longer than others-its always location-bees stay to warm and they start brooding then newborn eat food -delicate balance is required for different environments  Wink RDY-B
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Finski
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« Reply #68 on: January 31, 2010, 03:25:29 AM »

Finski, just because we humans like warmer places to live, doesn't mean our bees do....after all they have survived the last 200 million years without our 'clever' ideas !


Yes, but Englishmen have not yeat invented how to make their stone cottages warm.
Both bees and humans come from Africa.

Yesterday I visited summer cottage and I have one  5-frame nuc in the firewood shelter.
I put there 3 W infraheater. When I opened the cover, half of hive was full of ice crystals.
Bottom board was covered with ice.  Upper entrance was blocked with ice.

However water drilled from hive. - It means that when weather become milder, the snow inside the hive start to melt.
We have had the whole month -15C - -30C and temp has varied sharply. Southern people just don't undertand what it means.

That condensation show that bees stand many thing anf you need not to be mad for hive concensation.
It is better if you do not look inside the hive.



Yep, that guy needs more upper ventilation
« Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 05:09:52 AM by Finski » Logged

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Finski
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« Reply #69 on: January 31, 2010, 03:33:19 AM »

depends how long your food surplus will last -cold bees need extra feed to generate heat-

Yes, the hive is alive as long as they have food.

When hives are under half metre snow, it is difficult to give "some sugar".

During 47 years I have learned how to keep hives alive.

In insulated hives and with proper ventilation food stores last  8 months without extra feeding.
 - if you let bees stay in peace
« Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 03:43:23 AM by Finski » Logged

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