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Author Topic: hive loss so far  (Read 4267 times)
msully
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« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2010, 03:21:48 PM »

I've still got my 4 hives and 1 nuc.  One of the hives was a little light and the nuc is an experiment.  I've had sugar on those two most of the winter and have started putting sugar on the rest.  I may put some pollen patties on soon, but haven't decided for sure yet...
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USC Beeman in TN
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« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2010, 03:32:08 PM »

It in the upper 50's today and the 2 hives that were not active yesterday were not active today.  Lost both of them.  Both lost because I screwed up.  Somethings you can't control but when I personally screw up and kill the bees I really get irked at myself.  But I can tell you one thing...........those 2 mistakes won't happen again!!!
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danno
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« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2010, 03:40:49 PM »

It in the upper 50's today and the 2 hives that were not active yesterday were not active today.  Lost both of them.  Both lost because I screwed up.  Somethings you can't control but when I personally screw up and kill the bees I really get irked at myself.  But I can tell you one thing...........those 2 mistakes won't happen again!!!
The school of hard knox has the best teachers
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leechmann
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« Reply #23 on: January 15, 2010, 03:58:59 PM »

Here in Northern MN, temps were in the mid 30's today. Being that we've had stretches of 25 to 30 degrees below zero, for a week or two at a time, I've been very concerned about my bees. This is the first year of bee keeping for me, and I had 4 hives that were promising going into the winter. I just checked the hives and two of them are still alive, seem very active. I had wrapped the hives with tar paper so I have limited acess to see the bees. I pulled the cover off and looked through the center hole in the inner cover. I could see bees moving about in two of the hives. One of the other hive that looks like it's finished, the bees had come up into the hole in the inner cover hole, just packed in there, and that's were they died. Not sure what happened there. The forth hive is a mystery. I can't see the cluster, dead or alive, it's away from the center hole, so I can see anything.

I have to say that I'm very happy to have the two hives stilll aliive, with the weather we've been having. 

Thanks to all of you folks for helping out, giving us newbies advise. This forum is a great source for information. Thanks again.

Leechmann 
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kathyp
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« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2010, 04:09:30 PM »

Quote
may put some pollen patties on soon, but haven't decided for sure yet...

don't rush the pollen patties.  you don't want to encourage to much brood rearing early.  also, we have early pollen here.  it starts in February.  you may not need them, but i would not put them on earlier than mid February unless we have an unusual warm up.  you will want to watch the stores between now and first flow.  as the days get longer and we have some warm ones, they'll go through what they have stored very quickly. 
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« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2010, 06:07:35 PM »

well as I feared I knew that one yards that had some light hives going into the winter and I thought I could nurse them through but I ended up losing 2 hives and a nuc, about 4 other hives looked like they could make it but never know until the spring, I feed all hives and they were taking it so we will see.
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BEEMAN
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« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2010, 07:48:33 PM »

So far this winter with the rain and extended cold weather I still have all 15 of my hives. With the unusual cold temps down to 19 degrees and below freezing for about a week I was expecting the worst. Checked a number of them today and even with the rain, wind, and cool temps the girls were out flying. Not in full force but some were out working and bringing in a golden pollen. Good work girls.
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slaphead
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« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2010, 10:05:22 PM »

Lost 2 out of 6 so far with a third a cause for worry.  Have sugar boards on and they're going through those supplies fast in this warm weather. Roll on spring.

SH
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2010, 10:07:44 PM »

My 1 1/2 hives were both flying nicely to day.  I put dry sugar on both of them in November and the smaller one has used about 10 pounds now.  They've eaten a hole about 3 inches across up through the middle of the pile.   I'm thinking maybe I should put another piece of paper in there and fill it back up while the weather is decent.

 
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heaflaw
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« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2010, 04:51:12 PM »

I lost 1 out of 18.  They still had a lot of  honey but were 6 inches away from it in a small cluster.  It's been very cold for 2 weeks and I guess they couldn't move that far.  I had fed them heavily in late fall because I had been concerned about them.  I wasn't too surprised.  Only 1 out of 18 is good, but there is a long time to go until spring.
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Shawn
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« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2010, 04:54:08 PM »

Only have three and two seem to being doing good. Lots of activity from the two during the warmer days but Im affraid the third might not make it. Sitll see bees coming and going but not like the other two.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2010, 05:19:25 PM »

Finally got a chance to check on them today.  Home yard I'm 1 for 2.  So I cleaned up the mess from the one.  Obvious starvation although the bottom most box was completely full of honey.  I guess they moved up too soon.  The other hive was just starting to finish up the upper box so I threw the bottom box from the other one on top.  Hopefully that will get them through the remainder of winter.  The out yard I didn't get to, but I had my "landlord" check them out.  He said there was lots of activity from one hive and none from the other.  I suspect another deadout.  I'll probably go out there this week sometime and throw another honey filled box on top of the live one.  Sucks.  I guess I'm buying nucs instead of boxes this year.
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davedill
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« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2010, 05:53:45 PM »

This is my first winter with my one hive.  cracked it open today and they look good.  There is still a lot of honey in the upper box and the ball was half in both deeps.  It was a new package and they only filled 8 frames in both boxes.    so far so good but I will keep a close eye on them as spring comes.
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kathyp
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« Reply #33 on: January 16, 2010, 06:02:49 PM »

i have to revise my post.  the one that i thought was lost was looking pretty lively today.  good reminder not to pop the top unless you are SURE there are no bees in there!!  for some reason they do not fly at the lower temps that bring out the others.  they are probably still weak, but they are in there.....
glad i didn't pick the box up to carry to the barn, as was my intention smiley
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #34 on: January 16, 2010, 06:55:47 PM »

Yesterday it was in the 50s- 60 after a solid week or more of below freezing all day, every day.  I watched my hives and was so sad to see no bees coming out of my oldest and strongest hive while the other two were cavorting in the warm (relatively) air. 

I made sugar syrup for all three hives and opened the nonactive one first.  There were all the bees, alive and happy and clustered in the top box.  They were using the shim around the syrup baggie as a top entrance rather than the hive entrance. 

I am so relieved, but we still sometimes lose hives in the next couple of months to cold snaps so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

Linda T wet and rainy in Atlanta
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woodchopper
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« Reply #35 on: January 16, 2010, 10:29:09 PM »

We lost 2 of our 3 hives here in MA. about a month ago because of a cold snap we had after a long warm spell. I hadn't checked their reserves yet because I was afraid to go in when it was under 45 degrees. They died of starvation.
 I checked the remaining hive today because it was warm enough and was surprised to see they had died even though there was plenty of honey very close to them. Hope our hives in Maine are doing better.
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Rodni73
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« Reply #36 on: January 16, 2010, 11:18:16 PM »

Hi all

I have two hives.  Both hives are alives and kicking! we had a sunny day today and they came out in force. However, last year I lost a hive in December even though they had 30 pounds of stores because of a veroa kill that I did not discover until it was too late.

This year I took the following precausions that made a difference to me:

1-I fed them from Late August to mid november and I did not harvest any honey because they both started from nucs last may.  I think they should have enough stores.

2-I placed granulated sugars on top of the inner cover just in case

3-I insulated both hives with black hive covers and then an outer bleu tarp purshaced from home depot

4-I placed an upper entrance for the bess and opened the telescoping covers about an inch to allow moister to escape on Both hives.

5-Checked for veroa mites and medicated early

6-So far I think I am lucky.
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USC Beeman in TN
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« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2010, 11:55:01 PM »

I lost 1 out of 18.  They still had a lot of  honey but were 6 inches away from it in a small cluster.  It's been very cold for 2 weeks and I guess they couldn't move that far.  I had fed them heavily in late fall because I had been concerned about them.  I wasn't too surprised.  Only 1 out of 18 is good, but there is a long time to go until spring.

Is it possible they died from tracheal mites?  Was told that was a sign but I don't remember if they would have their heads in the comb or not.
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Ken
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« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2010, 08:16:48 AM »

I usually over winter 50 colonies.  Four years ago I started requeening all my colonies in late July and slow feeding 1 gallon of syrup during August to stimulate brood rearing.  All colonies with less than 1 full medium and 4 deep frames of honey in the brood nest are fed in early October until they have that amount of stores. 

Since I began this management practice I have lost a total of 2 colonies, both last winter, both of which refused to take syrup during August and October.  Before I began to requeen and stimulative feed I regularly lost 1 out of each 12 colonies overwintered.  Most losses come in late February or March so I am not out of the woods yet but so far no losses this winter.

Here in north Arkansas moisture is not a problem and I take no measurers to control it even with colonies with solid bottom boards.  All of my full sized colonies have screened bottoms but some nucs have solids.  Our temps are usually 20 to mid 50's but this winter in late December and early January we have had lows of 2 and highs of 28.  Now things are back to normal and all colonies are flying and taking care of business. 
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