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Author Topic: Project Gaps  (Read 1396 times)
mjdtexan
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« on: January 12, 2010, 10:37:43 AM »

I built my hive already out of used lumber. While I did as well as I could there are one or two little gaps that I would like to fill in before I paint the thing.

What do yall recommend to fill these gaps that would be safe for bees?

I assume there is no reason to paint the inside of the hive, ¿que no?
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Wine Maker
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charmd2
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2010, 12:27:23 PM »

I'd suggest a small touch of wood glue if you are insistant on fixing it.   Otherwise the bees will propolize it or use it as an alternative enterance. 
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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2010, 12:36:47 PM »

i patched some old boxes with wood putty.  if it's cracks and you want to strengthen the boxes anyway, gorilla glue is good.  it expands and i have not had them remove it.
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2010, 09:35:52 AM »

After only one year keeping bees I've come to believe that you should do something about those cracks, gaps and alternative entrances.  The bees don't guard them much if at all - hive beetles waltz right in through them, and the beetles will hide in any spot that the bees can't get to.  Before hive beetles it probably wasn't worth worrying about, but if they are a problem in your area maintaining a small single opening might help keep them out.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

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mjdtexan
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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2010, 10:15:00 AM »

After only one year keeping bees I've come to believe that you should do something about those cracks, gaps and alternative entrances.  The bees don't guard them much if at all - hive beetles waltz right in through them, and the beetles will hide in any spot that the bees can't get to.  Before hive beetles it probably wasn't worth worrying about, but if they are a problem in your area maintaining a small single opening might help keep them out.

I am going to seal them. I have sealed most of it. I am waiting a couple of days to seal the rest. I will take a photo of it today and post an image.

I have not made an entrance yet. I am confused about which way to go with this. The options seem to be Top entrance, side entrance and bottom entrance. I would like to build an entrance where I could attach a feeder to it unless there is a disadvantage to that. I guess what I am looking for is guidance. I do, however, get a kick out of this smiley -------------> afro
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Wine Maker
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2010, 11:54:56 AM »

Sounds like you are on the right track.  One thing you should consider - entrance feeders are notorious for setting off a robbing frenzy.  Large entrances / multiple entrances allow robbing to escalate into all out rape and pillage. Especially during a nectar dearth - which is exactly when you would be feeding.  Robbing is bad, it results in heaps of dead bees.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2010, 12:01:24 PM »

I would staple some screen wire  over them and let the bees propolize it shut.
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Michael Bush
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