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Author Topic: Hot Peppers  (Read 2400 times)
mjdtexan
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« on: January 11, 2010, 07:20:12 AM »

Does anybody here grow hot peppers?

I have ordered my pepper seeds from Baker Seeds, Tomato Growers Supply Company and Pepper Mania.
I also recieved seeds from individuals on the web. Here is what I will be planting this Spring

Jalapeno
Orange Habenero
Chocalate Habanero
Chichzen Hab
Red Savina
Fatalii
7 Pot/Pod
Bhut Jolokia
Monzano
Trinidad Scorpion
Hot Paper Lantern
Chocolate 7 Pot/Pod
Yellow Scorpion

I will be planting a two acre garden this season. About a ¼ acre will be for hot peppers. I am also going to grwo bell peppers and sheepnose pimento.

Nice to meet yall

Mike
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Wine Maker
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2010, 10:00:18 AM »

i grow what our climate will allow.  that's only the short growing time stuff.  chilies, habeneros if we have a long summer, ancho an jalapeño.
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irerob
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2010, 10:11:08 AM »

Whew to hot for me. I'll grow a row of red peppers to put in a viniger infusion for greens and the like but thats about it.
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mjdtexan
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2010, 10:13:28 AM »

Whew to hot for me. I'll grow a row of red peppers to put in a viniger infusion for greens and the like but thats about it.

This will my first year to grow them except for the banana peppers that I grew last year. I did just make a nice Habanero and Orange hot sauce the other day. Its really good. Believe it or not it is AWESOME on ice cream. Yes, you read that right.
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Wine Maker
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Mason
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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2010, 11:39:52 AM »

I grow peppers but have not had much luck germinating seeds.  I have some TAi Dragons that I would very much like to get some plants going with.  I failed numerous times this fall.  I think I have two basic problems.  The first is that a paper towel is difficult to keep wet and secondly the temperature needs to be warm.

My plan is to try again when the weather warms up and just use soil instead of paper towels.
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mjdtexan
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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2010, 12:55:55 PM »

I grow peppers but have not had much luck germinating seeds.  I have some TAi Dragons that I would very much like to get some plants going with.  I failed numerous times this fall.  I think I have two basic problems.  The first is that a paper towel is difficult to keep wet and secondly the temperature needs to be warm.

My plan is to try again when the weather warms up and just use soil instead of paper towels.

Here is what I am being taught elsewhere on the web

The seeds need to be germinated around 80f to 85f degrees. They are said to take 3 or 4 weeks to pop up out of the soil. During this time a light is useless, however you need light as soon as you see the plant pop up. Some people express that it is not uncommon for the seed to sprout after 5 or 6 weeks. They seem to think that seed starting potting mix is best used and that it be kept moist but not overly wet. Thats my take on it and I am going to start germinating my seeds in the next couple of days.
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Wine Maker
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2010, 06:38:45 PM »

In my climate it takes either a cold frame/green house or warming mat or both to get the peppers to germinate early enough to produce a crop by mid-September.  those that have grown peppers successfully here in Western Washington have told me to keep the plants in green house until mid-June before transplanting.  Plant should be about 6 inches tall or more.  With my new green house I put up last fall I'm going to try peppers for the 1st time ever.
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Sparky
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2010, 07:04:55 PM »

mjdtexan. You are growing a bunch that I never even heard of. I personally love hot and spicy food. We always grow some Jalapeno,Orange Habenero and
Cayenne peppers. A couple of years ago I grew a batch of red colored peppers which I believe to be Habenero's that were great. My Wife made a pot of chili that her and the kids could not eat, so it was all mine. I thought I was going to have to repaint the inside of the house after eating it for three days but man was it good. Wink
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wfuavenger
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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2010, 03:44:16 PM »

I sent you some Thai peppers on another forum... you should get them in a day or two, so long as USPS doesnt think it is anything odd....
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mjdtexan
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« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2010, 04:22:03 PM »

I sent you some Thai peppers on another forum... you should get them in a day or two, so long as USPS doesnt think it is anything odd....
  grin
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Wine Maker
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mjdtexan
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« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2010, 11:19:32 AM »







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Wine Maker
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wfuavenger
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« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2010, 02:17:44 PM »

any of those I sent you come up? They were the red and green ones, Thai.
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2010, 08:40:07 PM »

I grow peppers but have not had much luck germinating seeds.  I have some TAi Dragons that I would very much like to get some plants going with.  I failed numerous times this fall.  I think I have two basic problems.  The first is that a paper towel is difficult to keep wet and secondly the temperature needs to be warm.

My plan is to try again when the weather warms up and just use soil instead of paper towels.


You should try something like this home made bottom heat for starting seeds  using rope lights for the heat.  It really works.
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alfred
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« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2010, 09:02:22 AM »

That's pretty cool!
I'll bet that you could use the rope light thing to heat hives for spring build up as well....


I love to grow hot peppers. Still trying to make a good Melinda's habanero sauce recipe.
I will usually grow serrano. Jalapeno, Habanero, Thai Chile, Big Jims, Bananna, and a few bells. I get my peppers as starts from the local nursery my tomatoes as well. Growing season is short here but I have often thought of using a green house or cold frame to extend it.

Alfred
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Sparky
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« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2010, 08:36:55 PM »

David. I think this is a great !! idea. As you mentioned in your alternative supplies it would be nice with the rock tile board but you made good use of what you had. I also like that the ends of the rope lanes are open is probably a benefit to the life of the rope light, bulbs. JMO. Is the water barrels open, any to get moisture from ?
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