Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 26, 2014, 02:23:03 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: New Table Saw Blade  (Read 2973 times)
Two Bees
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 614


Location: Central NC


« on: February 11, 2010, 11:23:40 AM »

I am looking into replacing the blade on my 10" Jet table saw and want to ask the experts what they would recommend for cutting the typical bee hive materials.  Up to now, I have been using the "stock" blade that came with the saw that has 24 teeth.

Suggestions?

Logged

"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2010, 12:10:42 PM »

Unless you are doing some fancy cutting, cutting hard wood, or need extra smooth cuts, I'd go with a basic, cheap blade.  That's what I use and have had no problems, still going fine.  Even occasionally cuts oak well enough to put in my kitchen.

I'm not an expert saw-er, but I am an expert skin-flint grin.
Logged

Rick
nella
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 189

Location: Allentown, Pa.


« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2010, 12:33:13 PM »

I would go with a thin kerf carbide blade. You can find a reasonably priced one if you shop around. It will be a little more expensive than a regular blade but with better performance, like staying sharp longer and smoother cut.
Logged
Two Bees
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 614


Location: Central NC


« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2010, 01:17:24 PM »

I have a bit of a problem when I'm ripping an 8, 10, or 12 foot piece of pine board to make stands, bottoms, and tops.  It takes a little practice to push the board through the blade and fence without binding.

Is there a jig or technique that would make this a little easier and faster (not to mention, safer!)?

Logged

"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.
nella
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 189

Location: Allentown, Pa.


« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2010, 01:30:24 PM »

Check to see that the blade and fence are parallel. If the wood is binding on the blade check the sharpness and teeth set on the blade. A pine board will cut very easy on a 10" table saw.
Logged
contactme_11
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 344

Location: Springfield, MA


« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2010, 01:39:24 PM »

Honestly, for what you will be doing just get a good quality all-purpose blade. As far as ripping goes make sure the blade is sharp, the fence is straight with the blade or even a little (by a little I mean like 1/32") cocked out on the far end of the blade. Also don't rip wet wood it will bind like crazy, even new PT can be too wet from treatment.
Logged
David LaFerney
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 924


Location: Cookeville, TN - U.S.A.


WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2010, 06:36:12 PM »

I agree with contactme - unless you have a really good reason to do otherwise you should use a combo blade in your table saw.  I use mine to cross cut just as often as to rip.   Everyone who has a table saw should also have (build) a cross cut sled - you'll use it all the time.
Logged

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

Putting the "ape" in apiary since 2009.
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2010, 07:13:35 PM »

To set your blade, make sure it is unplugged from power source. run the blade all the way to the top, as high as it will go. If you don't have a stiff folding wood or plastic ruler, get one.
Now move your fence in close to where it will be and take up some slack in it.
Notice the teeth on the blade, every other one is to one side, ditto the other.
Now pick the tooth on the front side of the blade that points toward the fence, measure, same procedure for the back side of the blade. Now tighten the fence making sure neither end shifts.
Recheck the measurement, If correct tighten the fence all the way and readjust the blade high'th to where you will be sawing.

Also, If you do not have or use a push block, I'd advise to do so.
hope this helps. :)doak
Logged
PeeVee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 217


Location: Deposit, NY


« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2010, 11:01:03 PM »

I've had good luck with Irwin blades. Decent price, thin kerf, combination.

If you are ripping material that is longer than a couple feet, use extra roller stands for infeed and outfeed support. With the extra support you can concentrate on guiding the board and not so much on supporting the weight.  Using a featherboard will help with control.
Logged

-Paul VanSlyke - Cheers from Deposit,NY
nella
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 189

Location: Allentown, Pa.


« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2010, 11:17:43 PM »

Before you follow Doak's instructions make sure that the fence is perfectly aligned with the machined grove that the t-square rides in on the saw table top, then slide the fence againest the saw blade to see that the teeth are touching on the front side and back side or use a feelers gauge. If the teeth don't touch in the front and back don't change the fence setting, adjust the saw mounting underneath the table top so the blade is perfectly aligned with the fence. That will make the fence, saw blade and t-square in perfect alignment.
Logged
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2010, 11:41:02 PM »

Thanks nella, I needed that. Don't know why I assumed it was already there. :)doak
Logged
nella
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 189

Location: Allentown, Pa.


« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2010, 12:05:15 AM »

Hi Doak, that wasn't meant to be critical, just trying to pass on some things that I had to learn the hard way!! Cry
Logged
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2010, 12:31:04 AM »

Didn't take critical. I am very good about overlooking the obvious. :)doak
Logged
Two Bees
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 614


Location: Central NC


« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2010, 08:17:33 AM »

Thanks everyone!  Lots of good suggestions!

I don't think that I have ever checked the alignment the way described.  In addition, the inflow and outflow support is something that I had not thought about doing.

One thing that I had thought about doing is using two fences to form kind of a channel to slide the board through to the blade.  Maybe that would reduce the tendency for the long board to shift to the left or right while feeding it through the blade.

Has anyone done this?

Logged

"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.
contactme_11
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 344

Location: Springfield, MA


« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2010, 08:40:44 AM »

Don't do this. If the board does start to bind or kick you could get really hurt. Use one fence and if you can't do it yourself have someone help hold the board weight from the feed or discharge side.
One thing that I had thought about doing is using two fences to form kind of a channel to slide the board through to the blade.  Maybe that would reduce the tendency for the long board to shift to the left or right while feeding it through the blade.

Has anyone done this?


Logged
Irwin
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2343


Location: Lakeside OR

howdy all


« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2010, 09:48:02 AM »

I've had good luck with Irwin blades. Decent price, thin kerf, combination.

If you are ripping material that is longer than a couple feet, use extra roller stands for infeed and outfeed support. With the extra support you can concentrate on guiding the board and not so much on supporting the weight.  Using a featherboard will help with control.
Thank's I like the Irwin blades too.


                                            Irwin
Logged

Fight organized crime!  Re-elect no one.
cam
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 100

Location: Millbury Massachusetts USA


WWW
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2010, 04:13:42 PM »

I like the Woodworker II from Forrest - stays sharp for over a year at a time and I do a LOT of sawing [cabinet builder] using soft and hard woods. Also, Forrest resharpens them at a very reasonable price. I have 2 and one is about 10 years old, the other is about 5 years old.
Logged

circle7 honey and pollination
danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2237


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2010, 09:16:09 AM »

I buy cheap carbide tipped blades when on sale at Menards. Buy one 12.00 and get one free.  I'll get 6 or 8 and stock up.   We have 2 companies that sharpen then but its expensive so I just buy cheap and junk them when there dull
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.524 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 24, 2014, 02:21:09 PM
anything