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Author Topic: Blueberrys  (Read 7171 times)
Shawn
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« on: January 02, 2010, 04:41:48 PM »

I am thinking of ordering a collection of blueberrys from the below link. I know nothing about blueberrys and dont really like the taste of them. Im only planting for the bees and to have another type of plant I can profit from. I read you need really acidic soil, ph4 to 4.5. I have sandy soil here so how would you add the acid? Do the blueberrys spread by root? Any info would be great.

http://www.noursefarms.com/catalog/Product/COLLECTIONS/BB-COLL/All%20Season%20Blueberry%20Collection.aspx
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HAB
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2010, 05:27:18 PM »

Seems a bit pricey for my wallet. 
This last year my neighbor sold hundreds of dollars worth of u-pick Blueberries.  He has several varieties.
Earlier in the year he made 150 cuttings and ended up with about 100 plants.  If I help him with the labor (he's 80yrs old) he'll do 300 and go 50/50 with me.  He figures it will take about four hours to cut, trim, dip in root tone, and plant them in his bed.  Add in four hours of Bee Talk and it sounds like a great day!! bee bee bee
Know anyone that will let you take a few cuttings?  They are easy to root.
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Shawn
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2010, 05:31:45 PM »

I dont even think I know anyone around for miles and miles that grow blueberrys. Im not even sure they will grow here.
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Irwin
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2010, 05:32:35 PM »

When is the best time to take the cuttings.
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HAB
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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2010, 06:52:26 PM »

Try this method of rooting Blueberries=

http://www.ehow.com/video_5727067_root-blueberry-plants-cuttings.html
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Bee Happy
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« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2010, 10:27:10 PM »

we have them here - and sandy soil (had to compost a PILE of leaves for the garden) I imagine your county agriculture agent may do a soil test for you. (you can also ask the agent if your climate is suitable for them)

$46 a plant does sound kind of steep I know they propagate from seed, but I've only had them come up when they wanted to; none I've tried planting ever came to anything.
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Sparky
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« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2010, 11:55:28 PM »

I agree Shawn. That is to much to pay for 6 plants. Do some searches for on line sources and you will find a big list that sell cheaper. There is sure to be some varieties that will grow in your zone. A couple of sources to start, below. They do like acidic soils and they have a shallow root structure that spreads under the peat moss that keeps them from loosing moisture. http://www.danfinch.com/berrys.htm    http://www.alcasoft.com/winfrey/  
« Last Edit: January 05, 2010, 08:11:42 PM by Sparky » Logged
lakeman
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« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2010, 09:44:10 AM »

Too pricey, first check with your county agent, and see what varietys are acceptable for your state, mine probably would not do for you, and types for your area would not do here. Then go to craigs list, and search for a grower in your area, that is propagating them. last spring I got 60 plants for the price you are considering for 6 plants. Plus they will probably not all survive.
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alfred
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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2010, 11:01:15 AM »

Blueberries are really hard to grow here on the Colorado Front range I will guess that they are difficult to grow where you are as well. I have been told that what you want to do is use a lot of peat for acidicy. Basically bury a bale of it and plant the blueberries in it is what I was told by a local master gardener. I decided to skip it and I really like Blueberries. Instead I grow other things like raspberries or strawberries or other flowering plants that do well in our soil that the girls like. Have you seen them on the Hissop or the Russian sage? I also have Trumpetvine, Beebalm and Mint that I have to cut back all of the time and they love my lavender.  I think your neck of the woods is known for the fruit trees and vineyards. Or how about clover, buckwheat, or alfalfa if you want to get really serious?  So lots of choices without having to fight the local climate and soil.

 Why work so hard to grow Blueberries why not grow something else that will do better and easier? Seems like a lot of trouble and expense especially if you don't like them. The Blueberries will require that you amend any soil that you use. So if you plan on expanding the patch to a point where they are a significant source for your girls you will be buying tons of peat. So many other things you could grow, maybe even something you actually like.


Just my thoughts,
Alfred

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kathyp
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« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2010, 11:11:18 AM »

check with your master gardeners.  there are so many kinds of blueberries now, you may be able to find some for your area.  we grow them here and they are a joy.  the bees love them and we do too.  if you can find a variety that will grow for you, they are worth it. 
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« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2010, 01:30:19 PM »

Boyers Nursery ,Biglerville Pa  good price, I have always been happy with their Quality
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Russ
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« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2010, 01:31:48 PM »


Boyers Nursery ,Biglerville Pa  good price, I have always been happy with their Quality
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Russ
Shawn
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« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2010, 07:29:30 PM »

Alfred, I have most of the plants you said but I was looking for a plant, bush, tree that I could bennefit from, getting a crop. I have 10 raspberry plants, few strawberrys, and Cindi got me stuck on the hyssop plants. I planted 10 fruit trees last year along with a good garden. I will only have one hive left at my house this spring and the rest are going to the country for teh alfalfa fields. I just saw a deal on elderberries and they looked neat.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2010, 04:00:51 PM »

You can get a good blueberry kit of 6 bushes from Stark or some other nursery for either northern or southern climates.  Each kit has 3 varities for better polination and comes with a box of soil conditioner for changing the ph.  With a sandy soil I'd recommend rototilling so grass clippings or leaves into the soil to lower the ph also.  Another way to do it is to bury pruning clippings about 12 inches deep and plant the bushes over them.  The clippings will hold moisture as they rot and will keep the ph lower for a longer period than just grass clippings or leaves.
Last I checked a 6 bush kit cost around $40.00.  The next question is how many do you want.  If you plan to grow for resale you'd most likely want more than 6 bushes say a dozen?  I have 6 bushes for my own use.  plant them about 4 feet apart as the regular sized bushes will grow to 6-8 feet tall and become almost a hedge at 4 foot spacing.
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Shawn
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« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2010, 05:05:37 PM »

I looked the elderberry and dont think that would be a good thing, due to they can not be eaten raw according to diferent sources. Ive talked to some older generation people that have lived in the area and they said "they think" blueberrys will grow. I just want enough product to sustain my family and maybe give to family. The link I posted is a set of three different varietys but according to most is to expensive. Ill try looking around for cheaper plants if they say they have high yields.
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suz
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« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2010, 06:13:58 PM »

Shawn,
I checked the Nourse website. I think they mean 1 collection is $46. They say 2 ea. of 3 varities for a total of 6 plants per collection.  You could call and ask.  They are located in the Northeast so the types may not be good for your area. I have grown them all here in Maine and had great luck with them. But we are known for acid soil. If you really want to grow them in your sandy soil you will need to add compost as well as the peat. It's hard to get peat to take up moisture if it has been allowed to dry out. Also the very best top mulch is at least 4" of pine needles. As they break down they will continue to acidify your soil. Who knows maybe homegrown blueberries will agree with your tastebuds. : ) 
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Shawn
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« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2010, 06:28:40 PM »

Yes it is 6 one year old plants of different variets for $46.00. Ill probably call them, tell them where I am and what kind of soil and see if they suggest a type of bush or maybe they dont have anything that will work.
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Mason
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« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2010, 11:48:40 AM »

I checked my latest issue of GA Farmers and Consumers and there were plenty of people selling gallon jug blueberry plants for $1-$2 each.

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lakeman
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« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2010, 04:31:47 PM »

Yes it is 6 one year old plants of different variets for $46.00. Ill probably call them, tell them where I am and what kind of soil and see if they suggest a type of bush or maybe they dont have anything that will work.

This is still an excessively high price. your one year old plants are only going to be rooted sticks.
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b reeves
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« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2010, 08:07:45 PM »

Just planted 100 plants, put down ground pine bark mulch in rows about 10 inches deep, planted plants in the mulch not in the ground, installed micro sprinklers, make sure you plant a variety that blooms past your last freeze/frost date, the blooms dont hold much interest to bees, not a big source of nectar or pollen
Bob
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