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Author Topic: hunting with crossbow  (Read 2309 times)
Scadsobees
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« on: December 28, 2009, 10:27:48 AM »

Ok, I'd like to hunt.  I have two boys that are very interested, I'd like to get them into it too.  But if I invest in the hobby, I want to have a bunch of meat in the freezer for my 4 hungry boys.

But I don't have any of the equipment.  Well, I do have a 12ga from my grandpa that I can use.  But I'd really like to be able to take advantage of the most time to hunt with the smallest investment.

A muzzleloader gives me something like 4 weeks (gun + muzzle loader), and we do have a late doe gun season here in MI that I can use too.

The other thing that occurred to me was a crossbow.  Here (at least for now) we can use a crossbow during archery season, so if it was realistic I'd be able to use the crossbow from beginning of bow season to the end of the year.

And it looks like I can get a crossbow for a reasonable price, cheaper than a gun or muzzleloader.
http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/family/index.jsp?categoryId=2293469&sr=1&origkw=crossbow

What are your thoughts on crossbows, utility, ease of use, compared to a gun, are cheaper ones worthwhile, etc?  Is it a realistic starting weapon? Since I don't know much about them I don't have a whole lot to think about just yet...

My thought is that if I can get into hunting without too much investment and it starts paying off as I learn more, then I could more easily branch out into the other types of more expensive weapons.

Thanks!  Rick

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Rick
iddee
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2009, 02:14:53 PM »

I would not think cheap if I were introducing my sons to the most deadly activity known to man. I would find and join a local hunt club, make a few hunter friends, and learn it from experienced hunters. The alternative is, much too often, a funeral. When it comes to a family member, the easiest funeral to attend is your own. All others are much worse.

I have hunted since I was 7, my son since he was nine. It is a great activity, but so is mountain climbing. It is not for the inexperienced to go alone.
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2009, 02:27:42 PM »

True enough, your advice is taken.  I've done a little hunting, if you consider freezing my cahonies off sitting in a tree while nothing moves for hours hunting. rolleyes

But if I have to spend a lot of money on this right now it won't happen.  And if i don't kick it in and do it really soon while they have the desire, my sons probably won't care about it in a few years.

Cheap (or a good value grin )doesn't mean stupid, at least I hope not because I do a lot of stuff cheap rolleyes.  I have a 12 ga at my disposal, but I'd like a longer season.

And I am a cautious person, and we'll all be going to hunter safety class as soon as possible.

I know plenty of hunters that can and will help, I just need to pick a direction and dedicate myself, once I do that then I'll spend the time learning and more money as it pans out (or doesn't).

Beekeeping can be pretty deadly too, but I manage to do that on the cheap tongue.  It's usually the stupidity that kills.

So....is it worth trying to do all my hunting with a crossbow (at least for now), and is there any advice concerning them?  Smiley
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Rick
Keith13
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2009, 08:36:36 PM »

Rick,

I never wanted to shoot a bow and arrow because i belived man invented gunpowder for a reason. But, i have wanted to extend my hunting season because i love being in the woods. Recently Louisiana has legalized crossbows for deer. I plan to purchase a crossbow in 2011 to take advantage to the extra 3 months of deer season. My advice with crossbows is you get what you pay for dont try to go to cheap on this pay a litle more and have a lifetime of memories with your kids

Keith
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JP
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2009, 10:17:53 AM »

Rick & Keith, I hunt with gun/black powder/bow. I have never fired a crossbow. What I have heard about crossbows however, is that they can be quite noisy, which could very well mean deer will duck once the bolt is launched.

My advice is to go to a shop & shoot several different ones & choose the one that is most quiet.

Tons of animals have been taken with slow, quiet traditional bows. Quiet is paramount when you're shooting an arrow from a bow or bolt from a crossbow.

Good luck in your quest & safe hunting!


...JP
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2009, 06:44:13 PM »

Most people who take up deer hunting would be dollars ahead to just buy rib eyes.  Myself included.  Free meat isn't usually the best reason.  Of course if you hunt at night over bait you might do pretty good until you get caught.
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« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2009, 07:23:55 PM »

As mentioned by others about the price of a crossbow, you most definitely get what you pay for. There are some cheaper models that will get you started but if you paid less than you would have, if you bought a rifle, you did not get much. The one that is in the link that you posted, made by 10 Point is one of the Cadillac's of the crossbows, but is expensive. It is with out a doubt one of the best cocking mechanisms to get a accurate draw, to keep the string centered on the bolt and witout being a horse to use it. We experimented to compare the ones cocked by hand and noticed the shots moved around more than the mechanical means of cocking. Some of the noise can be dealt with on the cheaper models, to an extent , but also comes as a added price. If you buy any that are shooting over 340 fps. and are not extreme noise makers, the string jump,reaction of the deer will not be enough to worry about if shot at 40 yds. or less. DON'T get caught up in the speed numbers only when making a purchase and I would recommend finding dealers in your area to shoot a couple to give you a taste of what to look for.
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Bee Happy
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« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2009, 02:35:55 AM »

I once got a pair of whitetail II compounds for $35 each on closeout (Brand new, discontinued) - so I completely agree with you get what you pay for - except that if you're ok with waiting a great deal comes along once in a while.
 This is only my preference; but I think it's hard to substitute for a reasonably priced bolt action in 308 or 30-06 you can buy 30-06 in most country stores around here and 308 is almost as available everywhere. I think it depends heavily on terrain and population too.
I've always wanted a crossbow myself but a bolt can zip right through most animals and keep going with reduced energy and then you have to hope it sticks somewhere right away instead of being drastically deflected to points unknown and unintended. (sorry to be a wet blanket - I think a crossbow would be wicked fun in a controlled environment.)
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Keith13
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« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2009, 09:28:48 AM »

Most people who take up deer hunting would be dollars ahead to just buy rib eyes.  Myself included.  Free meat isn't usually the best reason.  Of course if you hunt at night over bait you might do pretty good until you get caught.

Ain't that the truth. Hunt for the camaraderie and enjoyment of the time spent with family and friends. Actually shooting something is lagniappe.

Keith
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2009, 09:35:11 AM »

Most people who take up deer hunting would be dollars ahead to just buy rib eyes.  Myself included.  Free meat isn't usually the best reason.  Of course if you hunt at night over bait you might do pretty good until you get caught.

Well, that's great, but if I ain't getting any free meat that means I ain't killing anything, and then I'm going to lose interest fast not to mention my boys interest grin and I need to see SOME return on investment.

Although that night hunting idea sounds pretty good.... rolleyes
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Rick
Scadsobees
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« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2009, 09:39:46 AM »

Thanks for the discussions and answers, I'll stop by some stores and start asking some more questions.  At least now I know a few of the questions to ask.

My problem is that unless I put some investment into it I'm not going to do it, and i'm just looking for the most useful investment.  My boys are pushing for it, and I would like to get them into hunting and spend some time in the woods with them.

Rick
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Rick
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