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Author Topic: Lemon scented pink flowering gum  (Read 1250 times)
Geoff
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Location: Yinnar, Australia


« on: December 26, 2009, 07:42:08 PM »

        Beautiful tree For Buds pleasure




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Local Area Network in Australia - the LAN down under.
annette
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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2009, 12:56:25 PM »

The leaves look like eucalyptus
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SlickMick
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Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2009, 02:55:43 PM »

You are in fact correct Annette. When Aussies speak of "gum" they dont mean the chewing kind, they mean eucalyptus

I was in the Gippsland area of Victoria a few years ago when the flowering gum were flowering and they are magnificant

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
philinacoma
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« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2010, 05:58:54 PM »

Hi Annette,

Slicko is quite correct. The general populous do call all eucalypts 'gums'. I only learnt recently that there are different types of eucalypts, of which gum is only one of them. There are also: Iron Bark, Peppermint, Stringy Bark, Box, Wrinkled Bark and Mallee. Well at least these are the Victorian ones.

Then you have different species and varieties of each and of course they all produce different honey with distinct flavours and pollen of different quality. Yellow Box and Messmate (a stringy bark) are two of the most common.

Phil
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annette
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Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2010, 11:14:17 PM »

Yes, I recognize the leaves, but I never saw flowers like that on our eucalyptus
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SlickMick
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Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2010, 01:46:28 AM »

And of course one of the reasons they are called gums is that if you carefully peel off the green from a leaf on some species you are left with a film of gum which when I was a kid you could hold it between your two thumbs and play like a musical instrument.

Well you could not play Waltzing Matilda and sing it at the same time  rolleyes

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
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