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Author Topic: What is the purpose of using a Nuc box?  (Read 10691 times)
Grandma_DOG
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« on: December 13, 2009, 09:07:10 PM »

Heat conservation aside...If the bees are in a warm climate like Texas, what purpose does putting a new split in a nuc box?  Any reason that the nuc box is better than a deep?
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manfre
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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2009, 11:36:59 PM »

A nuc box is cheaper. Less wood and fewer frames. Less space for the bees to try and ventilate and defend.
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« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2009, 11:45:17 PM »

As for splits in a really warm climate, I'd have to agree with you, why not go right to a medium or deep. But nucs come in handy for so many applications where do you even begin to answer that question.

Now, in a really warm climate when considering nucs for splits, well nucs have less space, so a colony say with a slower ability to build up might do better in a more condensed space, better able to fight off shb/wax moth and as you stated better heat retention.


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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2009, 05:49:19 AM »

I suppose if you have a follower board and some foundationless frames so the excess room isn't really part of the hive and has nothing the wax moths and small hive beetles would eat, but has frames, in case the bees get over to that side (which they often do) then a regular sized box does fine.  In the case of eight frame mediums one box is the same size as a five frame deep.  But room that needs to be guarded and room that absorbs heat and humidity are the issues with a small split in a large box.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnucs.htm
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2009, 09:52:13 AM »

I built a nuc with an attached bottom and a round entrance (and screened vents) that can be closed with a cork - awfully handy for moving or holding a few frames of bees, brood, or honey.  It's a good size to use as a toolbox too, then if I need it I can just dump everything out.  But I think for splits I'm going to use followers in standard boxes so I only have the one size that fits all.  I can already see that it would stink to have a big pile of unused equipment taking up space but none of it be the size you need.
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Finski
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« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2010, 02:15:42 AM »

Heat conservation aside...If the bees are in a warm climate like Texas,

How warm Texas is at night and during rainy weather?

Brood area temp is abut 32C ?
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Grandma_DOG
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« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2010, 11:42:40 PM »

How warm Texas is at night and during rainy weather?

Brood area temp is abut 32C ?

Texas is Hot in Spring, darn Hot in Summer, Hot in Fall, and cool in winter. Our roads melt here, and hell is a local phone call.
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buzzbee
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2010, 07:20:29 PM »

It gives a smaller area for a swarm or split to have to defend also.
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doak
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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2010, 08:33:10 PM »

Consider how many bees are going into it to begin with. Whether a nuke, split, or swarm.
I had a swarm that would not accept 2 deeps and a medium. When I added 2 more mediums they went in that day.

If I had a super colony I was making a split from and wanted it to get off to a good start. It would get a 8 or 10 frame box, medium or deep, which ever appropriate. As for defense, that's what the entrance reducer is for. Inside space has little to do with defense if the entrance is controlled :)doak
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joetraff
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« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2010, 04:49:04 AM »

Good to know some really informative facts.
Please keep us posted.
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bugleman
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« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2010, 12:44:54 PM »

In my area unused frames are a way for pests like yellow jackets to form a beach head.  If the cluster is above the entrance in the late summer the few guard bees can be easily defeated.
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zubaer
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« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2011, 02:00:08 AM »

to release the excessive heat,you can use ventilation system in the nuc box
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moyeen
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« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2011, 12:26:27 PM »

A nuc box is cheaper. Less wood and fewer frames. Less space for the bees to try and ventilate and defend.



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kluger1372
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« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2011, 06:52:57 AM »

It's using for nuking.
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jdave1372
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« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2011, 03:22:12 AM »

Maybe it's used to knuckle down the bees.
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spyder1372
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« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2011, 08:13:24 AM »

Bees are not that much funny.
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Sparky
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« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2011, 09:10:29 PM »

One factor to consider is if you have a small colony to go through winter, the 5 frame nuc with a super above would be a better choice considering when they are in a tight cluster from cold they can move above their own heat to get to food but might not be able to move to food and make it back that is to one side and have the colony starve with food that close.
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Bee Brothers Apiary
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« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2011, 08:34:31 AM »

Mike Palmer 4/2011 The Sustainable Apiary Part 1 of 2
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ithorp1372
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« Reply #18 on: September 20, 2011, 11:01:31 AM »

I have the same question.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2011, 10:07:53 PM »

Thanks for the link to M Palmer’s presentation.  That was an informative presentation on the power of nucs and the configurations that Mr Palmer uses.  The audio quality wasn’t very good, but the content was.  Its nice to finally see some photos (in the video) of M Palmer's configurations.
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