Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 21, 2014, 06:39:34 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Clustering temps  (Read 1137 times)
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« on: December 16, 2009, 02:12:04 PM »

Can anyone tell me at what temperature honeybees will come  out of a cluster and occupy the whole hive and/or what temp they will move into a full cluster.
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
fermentedhiker
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 514


Location: Midcoast Maine


« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2009, 03:39:35 PM »

My Dec/Jan state beekeeping newsletter in an article on the beehive in the winter makes the statement "Bees begin to form a loose cluster when the temp within the hive reaches 57.2F and at 42.8F all of the bees in the hive become involved in forming the cluster.  The temperature of the cluster is maintained at 44F(approx) regardless of the outside temp.
Logged

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
--Douglas Adams
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2009, 03:47:40 PM »

My Dec/Jan state beekeeping newsletter in an article on the beehive in the winter makes the statement "Bees begin to form a loose cluster when the temp within the hive reaches 57.2F and at 42.8F all of the bees in the hive become involved in forming the cluster.  The temperature of the cluster is maintained at 44F(approx) regardless of the outside temp.

Thanks.  Thats what I'm looking for. 

Bee-nuts
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
bmacior
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 169


Location: Payson Utah


« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2009, 04:39:43 PM »

I've read they will be dispersed through the super at 64 degrees.
Logged
robbo
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 42

Location: NSW - Northern Rivers


« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2009, 05:06:42 PM »

Just a revise for anyone playing at home in metric   cool

-----------------------

My Dec/Jan state beekeeping newsletter in an article on the beehive in the winter makes the statement "Bees begin to form a loose cluster when the temp within the hive reaches 14.0C and at 5.9C all of the bees in the hive become involved in forming the cluster.  The temperature of the cluster is maintained at 6.66C (approx) regardless of the outside temp.
Logged
bigbearomaha
Guest
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2009, 07:33:02 PM »

From   Bee Culture Sept 1, 2009, the tight cluster temperature can range from 70F to 90-95 F.


Quote
Individual bees are cold blooded, but a healthy cluster of bees within a hive, with honey positioned correctly, has a great deal of control over its group temperature. As the outdoor temperature approaches about 55-57F, depending on wind and sun conditions, bees within a hive begin to loosely centralize themselves near the bee nursery area (the brood nest) or near stored honey combs if the nursery has already been closed down for the season. As the day really cools to the 40s or so, bees will have clearly centralized themselves and will have begun to cozy-up. Colder still and the bees, just like our chilled, hypothetical human test population, will compact tightly. Some bees are in the interstices between combs while others are laying head first in empty cells. This tight configuration forms a solid, living cluster having roughly the volume of a soccer ball. The population at this point consists of adult worker bees, possibly some immature bees and the queen. No drones. They were all 'eliminated' during the Autumn and will be reproduced during the following Spring season. If baby bees are present, the nursery area will be kept at around 90-95F while bees making up the outer layer will be nearer 40F. If no developing bees are present, the center of the cluster will be around 70F


Big Bear
Logged
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5312


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2009, 11:24:55 PM »

That is very interesting because I always thought the temperatures was about 90 or so in the center of the cluster around the queen. this is some different information, but it makes sense that they would keep it very warm for the brood.  So not as warm for the queen it appears.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.229 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 18, 2014, 01:39:27 PM
anything