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Author Topic: Collecting a feral hive  (Read 2272 times)
philinacoma
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« on: November 29, 2009, 08:54:49 PM »

G'day all,

I'm collecting a feral hive tomorrow out of someone's compost bin. I am planning on putting it into a hive box I was left with to put a swarm in. The box either does or did have a small queenless swarm in it that has dwindled down to almost nothing. I have not seen the feral yet, but from the description there are at least couple of combs involved.

What is the best way of transferring the combs into a frame? I assume I should use a wired frame with no foundation? The combs I have gathered in the past have been very soft, is this typical?

Any recommendations on how best to approach the job?

Ta
Phil
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fermentedhiker
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« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2009, 09:01:56 PM »

I'm not sure what you mean by a "wired" frame without foundation.  If you thinking of the normal wire holes in a frame to run the wires through then no I wouldn't do that.  Those holes are in the center of the frame thickness-wise which would keep you cutout combs from being in the center of the frame.  Just use a frame without foundation and use rubber bands or string to tie the cutout combs in place. 

Have fun.
Adam
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2009, 09:20:10 PM »

look in the bee removal section.  you'll find some examples of how to tie comb into frame and lots of info on doing removals.  when you have read that stuff, you might  have more questions smiley  ask away.

take pictures!!!!!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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SlickMick
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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2009, 11:12:48 PM »

Yeah Phil take pitchers.. we cant stand others having fun when we're not.

Errr should your next post be on that thread started by Mick from your neck of the woods when he had to cool his goolies over a tinnie of VB shocked shocked

Slicko

By the way use an empty frame and lie it down on something flat with some string running lengthwise under it, put in your comb and tie the string over the top. That helps hold the comb in place while you get rubber bands on it
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
philinacoma
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« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2009, 12:53:26 AM »

Thanks Slicko,

I was wondering about that step. I found it a bit messy the first time I tried to get the comb in place.

I sure hope I don't end up needing the tinnies. Luckily I don't react to bee stings like my wife does. Her foot is still swollen and sore 3 days later. At least I dont react to a sting on the arm like that, multiple stings to the aggates may be a different story though!  Lips Sealed

Phil
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mick
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« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2009, 01:52:55 AM »

I always wondered about "wiring the comb in" until realised that you take an empty frame, stick the hive comb in it as best fit you can, then wrap it with wire about 6 times, an inch or two apart, so it looks like IIIIIIIIII, not ________
                                                    ________
                                                    ________

I spent so much of my brain energy worrying about the yanks sewing wire through comb to make it look like 4 strand frame.
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SlickMick
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« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2009, 11:42:35 PM »

Hey Phil, how'd ya go with that feral hive? Did'ja have to break out the VB? Did'ja? Or was it all cool with the 'nads

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
philinacoma
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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2009, 07:42:24 AM »

 a nice easy one. The hardest part of the access was the rose bushes. tongue They were very well behaved bees and I only saw one trying to sting me through the gloves.



And the best thing was the tinnies stayed in the fridge, not on the googies. Smiley

The owner of the property didn't know the hive was there and opened up the compost bin to find probably 3 combs covered in bees. Looks like he dropped it pretty quick!
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SlickMick
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2009, 03:16:50 PM »

Nice one Phil and its nice to know also that the VB was intended for its more conventional use grin

Sliko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
philinacoma
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Location: Coburg, Vic, Australia


« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2009, 06:57:06 AM »

Yeah, well I'm still a coward when it comes to handling the bees. I wear the full suit.

If I'm not touching the hive I'll happily walk up to them and look deep into their eyes in shorts and a tee shirt. I've only been stung by them the once, so far.  Wink
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SlickMick
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« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2009, 07:05:22 AM »

Come on Phil

It stings for only a little while rolleyes

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
philinacoma
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Location: Coburg, Vic, Australia


« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2009, 07:42:32 PM »

Depends how loose those shorts are...Who wants to have to pull the tinnies out of the fridge for sore nads?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2009, 02:06:58 PM »

If there are wax combs hanging from the lid of the compost bin, then they are probably honey bees.  If the bees are down in the compost, more likely they are bumble bees or ground hornets.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
philinacoma
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Location: Coburg, Vic, Australia


« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2009, 05:48:14 PM »

Hi Michael,

They were definitely honey bees. We don't have bumble bees or ground hornets. Other than honey bees, the only thing that it could be here would be European Wasps which are more likely to be in the compost rather than hanging off the lid.

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