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Author Topic: BeeMax Polystyrene Hives and Nucs  (Read 7903 times)
bigbearomaha
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« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2009, 07:38:02 AM »

veddy inderesdink.  thank you.

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homer
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« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2009, 11:15:57 AM »


..... the trick is to make sure the top has a higher insulated value then the walls, so the condensation happens on the walls and runs down and does not drip on the bees.  That is also a major issue with the traditional Langstroth design (assuming you don't put upper ventilation to allow condensation and heat to escape),  you get the cool air space above the inner cover where condensation takes place, and if there is enough, it drips back down on the bees.

Robo,

Do you have to make any modifications to the poly nucs to make sure the insulation on the lid is sufficient, or are the designed with that in mind.

Also, so you implement this same concept into your wooden nucs and full hives that you overwinter?
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Pond Creek Farm
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« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2009, 04:37:31 PM »

Rob would the insulated, vented shims that I have seen do the same for a Lang hive? I have seen the 2 inch thick piece of foam inserted into the shim, and I would assume that this increases the insulation value significantly over the bare wood walls.  What do you think?
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Brian
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« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2009, 07:34:02 PM »

I found that a slice of 1.5 inch polystyrene placed on top of the inner cover, under the top greatly reduces condensation at the top of my wooden Langs.  My inner covers have a slot in one end to form a top entrance or ventilation vent.  I place the inner cover so that this is up.  Next add a 1.5" spacer rim, to give room for bars of candy and pollen, then the polystyrene and finally the top.  I'm guessing the candy, polystyrene insulation and vent all contribute to the reduction in condensation.  My newer tops have the 1.5" insulation built in, making life a little easier and improving the weather protection for the inner cover and vent.

FYI, you can buy polystyrene tops for 10-frame wooden Langs from Dadant.  These seem like a good idea to me, as long as you use an inner cover and paint them  Smiley

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Robo
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« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2009, 08:24:25 PM »

Do you have to make any modifications to the poly nucs to make sure the insulation on the lid is sufficient, or are the designed with that in mind.

I do not make any modifications to the lids on the polystyrene nucs.  The reduced space of the nuc and the fact that the cluster is in relative close proximity to the top keeps it warm enough for no condensation directly above them.  Any condensation will take place along the edges and run down the sides.  I do put a 1/2" drainage hole in the corner of the nucs and tip the nuc so any water runs out.  If you don't provide drainage, they will collect quite a bit of water in the bottom and become quite wet.

Quote
Also, so you implement this same concept into your wooden nucs and full hives that you overwinter?

I don't overwinter wooden nucs, and have switched most of my full hives to polystyrene as well.  On the full size hive I use a 2" piece of foiled rigid insulation either right on top of the top hive body,  or on top of a 3" sugar shim that is made out of the 2" foiled rigid insulation.  No top ventilation and no inner cover.

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Rob would the insulated, vented shims that I have seen do the same for a Lang hive? I have seen the 2 inch thick piece of foam inserted into the shim, and I would assume that this increases the insulation value significantly over the bare wood walls.  What do you think?

Yes, I use 2" rigid insulation on my hives.   If you have any type of upper ventilation, then I'm not sure how much, if any, help it provides.  Triple pane super insulated windows don't help any more than single pane windows when you leave them cracked open.
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