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Author Topic: What does your hive sit on?  (Read 4823 times)
Chrisd4421
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« on: November 21, 2009, 08:16:14 AM »

Hi all,
    The next round of my newbie quesitons are here and it is related to your hive bottom, stand and what your hive stand sits on.

For the hive bottom:
  • I am in NJ and would like to know if running a screened bottom year round would hurt the hive in the winter.
  • I am looking at the Rossman Screened Bottom Board w/Small Hive Beetle Trap which it appears I can run without the trap for a screened bottom and put a sticky board on the botom for mite counts.  Has anyone done this?

As for the hive stand:
  • How many use one?  From what I read, the bees really dont care, they dontneed a landing pad.
  • Are here any instances where I wouldnt run with a hive stand?

And lastly, where to place the hive:
  • In the catalogs, I see them all without hive stands, in a garden bed, right on the ground.  I have a feeling most dont do this.
  • If I use cinder blocks, how high off the ground?  Doe this help deter mice and others looking for a winter home?
  • What about 4 poles set into the ground for a better look?
  • Would I use a hive stand here as well with the hive being elevated?

Thank you everyone....
Chris
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lenape13
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2009, 08:36:01 AM »

I have built a small patio from 2'X2' concrete pavers.  (Be sure to put landscape fabric down under the pavers to keep the grass from growing between them if you go this route.)  I then built columns of block with 18"X24" pavers on top, with my hives sitting on them.  The patio keeps the grass down so that I don't have to mow, and the columns bring the hives to a comfortable working height.

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Hemlock
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2009, 09:15:40 AM »

If you can talk to some of your local beeks to hear how they deal with the wind, cold, heat, & rain in your area when it comes to hive setup. 

Ground + wood = rot.  Elevate your hives.  Mine are a foot off the ground which is covered deep with cypress mulch.  However, I will likely switch to a block pad much like 'lenape13' is using in the next year.  The mulch holds in moisture.  Not bad in summer but not good in winter.

I use a screened bottom board that can be closed when it's too cold.

A hive stand gives the bees a little more room for landings & takeoffs.  Not necessary. I do not use them.

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JP
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2009, 10:31:17 AM »

Everyone seems to get shb's sooner or later so let's start there. Wherever you place your hives start with some type of ground covering, gravel, heavy plastic, even a concrete pad would be ideal. This will cut down/remove shb's ability to multiply in the substrate below the hives.

I like mine off up the ground but not too high. Remember, you will be stacking boxes as colony size grows and you want to be able to pull boxes/work boxes without needing a ladder.

Landing boards are up to you but they do make it easier for returning bees laden with pollen, etc... to get back into the hive.

Screen bottom boards are ok, but you may want to seal those hives come winter time. I've gone to all solid bottoms, my preferance.

Hard to beat 4 x 4's and cinder blocks: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/-MbHh7CUxXRyn2GpGsUkPg?feat=directlink


...JP
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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2009, 12:28:56 PM »

i use screened bottom boards, but they are closed about 8 months out of the year.  they are another thing that you can skip if your budget is an issue.  some of us really like them, but some, like JP have switched back.

if you go the cinder block route, make sure you do as lenape suggests and have a good base.  i don't remember who it was, but someone on here found their stand shifted in the mud and dumped their hives.  you don't want that!

KISS!  keep that in mind and you will be fine.
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homer
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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2009, 01:26:29 PM »

Everyone seems to get shb's sooner or later so let's start there. Wherever you place your hives start with some type of ground covering, gravel, heavy plastic, even a concrete pad would be ideal. This will cut down/remove shb's ability to multiply in the substrate below the hives.

I like mine off up the ground but not too high. Remember, you will be stacking boxes as colony size grows and you want to be able to pull boxes/work boxes without needing a ladder.

Landing boards are up to you but they do make it easier for returning bees laden with pollen, etc... to get back into the hive.

Screen bottom boards are ok, but you may want to seal those hives come winter time. I've gone to all solid bottoms, my preferance.

Hard to beat 4 x 4's and cinder blocks: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/-MbHh7CUxXRyn2GpGsUkPg?feat=directlink


JP.... I love your set up with the 4x's and Cinder Blocks!  I now have new plans for next year!  Thanks for the inspiration!!!

...JP
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Joelel
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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2009, 01:30:33 PM »

Hi all,
    The next round of my newbie quesitons are here and it is related to your hive bottom, stand and what your hive stand sits on.

For the hive bottom:
  • I am in NJ and would like to know if running a screened bottom year round would hurt the hive in the winter.
  • I am looking at the Rossman Screened Bottom Board w/Small Hive Beetle Trap which it appears I can run without the trap for a screened bottom and put a sticky board on the botom for mite counts.  Has anyone done this?

As for the hive stand:
  • How many use one?  From what I read, the bees really dont care, they dontneed a landing pad.
  • Are here any instances where I wouldnt run with a hive stand?

And lastly, where to place the hive:
  • In the catalogs, I see them all without hive stands, in a garden bed, right on the ground.  I have a feeling most dont do this.
  • If I use cinder blocks, how high off the ground?  Doe this help deter mice and others looking for a winter home?
  • What about 4 poles set into the ground for a better look?
  • Would I use a hive stand here as well with the hive being elevated?

Thank you everyone....
Chris

We use screened bottoms and top inter cover. They allow you to look inside to see if you get swarm cells and SHB and other. You need to close it up when it gets 70 and lower. We build all our own hives. Our stands are on 4 legs two feet off the ground all treeted wood,legs on bricks. Grease on the leg bottoms to keep ants and all out. Chicken wire on the bottom of the stand to keep coons and other critters out off the bottom screen.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2009, 04:50:33 PM »

None of my hives have a mouse ramp or a landing board.  Smiley  My stands are treated two by fours setup so that 14 of my eight frame medium hives are clustered up against each other.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmisc.htm#hivestand
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Sparky
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2009, 07:49:23 PM »

Correct me if I am wrong but when Chrisd4421 ask about hive stands I think he was talking about the stands that the bottom board sets on that some suppliers offer with the tapered landing board, not what the total hive sets on to keep it up off the ground.
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2009, 08:04:58 PM »

I often have access to pallets.   I stack them up about 3 or 4 high or so and put the hives on them.

Big Bear
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Bee Whisper82
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« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2009, 10:48:18 PM »

Quote
I have built a small patio from 2'X2' concrete pavers.  (Be sure to put landscape fabric down under the pavers to keep the grass from growing between them if you go this route.)

I am a new beeker and this is my first year and I had built some stands for my hives and found they were to high after adding supers.  I think I am going to try lenape13 idea.  I have a bunch of these same concrete pavers that I have stacked behind the shed. 

                     Thanks for a great idea               
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alfred
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« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2009, 12:22:55 AM »

I have two 4"x4"x8' posts laid side by side like railroad tracks set up on three 4"x4"x3' cross peices, Like railroad ties. Then on top of that I laid a peice of ply 3'x8'. I get 4 or 5 hives on them stacked close together.

Alfred
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Chrisd4421
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« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2009, 07:10:50 AM »

Correct me if I am wrong but when Chrisd4421 ask about hive stands I think he was talking about the stands that the bottom board sets on that some suppliers offer with the tapered landing board, not what the total hive sets on to keep it up off the ground.

I was asking about the "Mouse Ramps" as Michael put it....but the answers lead me to other alternatives.  I have 17"x17"x3" cement blocks laying around.  I will put 8 of them together (2 deep by 4 long) as a pad then will eleveate the hives about 10" above that. 

Thank you everyone!!!
Chris
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BeeHopper
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« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2009, 08:08:54 AM »

All my hives sit on concrete blocks elevated  like so or custom made concrete pads ( sorry no pic ) that are made from sakrete with fibers imbedded for strength. The pads have the same footprint as the hive bottom and 3 inches thick. I really did myself in on the pads, they're so HEAVY  embarassed

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Chrisd4421
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« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2009, 08:14:02 AM »

All my hives sit on concrete blocks elevated  like so or custom made concrete pads ( sorry no pic ) that are made from sakrete with fibers imbedded for strength. The pads have the same footprint as the hive bottom and 3 inches thick. I really did myself in on the pads, they're so HEAVY  embarassed

BeeHopper,
   With you being in NJ as well, do you have any advise on the creened bottoms?  Partial year, full year, at all?

Thanks!!!
Chris
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BeeHopper
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« Reply #15 on: November 22, 2009, 09:52:06 AM »

All my hives sit on concrete blocks elevated  like so or custom made concrete pads ( sorry no pic ) that are made from sakrete with fibers imbedded for strength. The pads have the same footprint as the hive bottom and 3 inches thick. I really did myself in on the pads, they're so HEAVY  embarassed

BeeHopper,
   With you being in NJ as well, do you have any advise on the creened bottoms?  Partial year, full year, at all?

Thanks!!!
Chris


Chris,

Check your PM.

BH
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2009, 09:53:17 AM »

Oh oh oh.   I got it,  I got it.  I know the answer.  I win ,  I win!!!!

Quote
What does your hive sit on?

Answer:  it's bottom!

Thank you, thank you very much.

Big Bear

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Sparky
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« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2009, 10:01:31 AM »

 grin grin grin Funny Guy! Big Bear. Nice for Laugh for the day.
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Two Bees
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« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2009, 07:44:36 AM »

Wow, Lenape13!  You put a lot of thought and work into those honeybee patios!  Looks good!

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lenape13
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« Reply #19 on: November 23, 2009, 08:02:29 AM »

Wow, Lenape13!  You put a lot of thought and work into those honeybee patios!  Looks good!



Thanks!
Now I'm trying to find a whole lot of little bee-sized patio furniture for the girls to relax on after a hard day's work... grin
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