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Author Topic: Cindi's learning Strine  (Read 6841 times)
SlickMick
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« on: November 19, 2009, 04:33:54 PM »

Bygum that Cindi's a grouse sheila.

On another thread she asked me what "grouse" meant so I told her eh? And I told her that if she started speaking it over there where she lives she could start a whole new language, now wouldnt that be grouse?

So I'm thinking that we should be helping her out here by educatin her with some of these grouse new words that she could bamboozle her mates with and then she could really start a new language, fair dinkum

So Lone, Mick and the rest of youse guys start giving her new words that she can flabbergast her mates with

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
annette
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2009, 07:46:04 PM »

Yes, I would like to see that list also. Many years ago my husband bought me a cd of music and I can't remember the artist,but he obviously was speaking Strine and that is why I could not understand what he was saying, but now I see many of the words you fellows use he was speaking on the CD.
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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2009, 10:29:41 PM »

Mick, by George, by golly, bygum.....now that has gotta be a totally funnnnnnneee thing.  Don't, is all I can really say, I have the hardest time with my own English language, let alone trying to speak a totally different jargon from somewhere from half way down to the bottom of the world, smiling.  I am positive and for sure that if I tried to use some of the Australian bygums, I would be in trouble, I would mix up all the words and no one would ever again believe a word that I said  shocked shocked shocked and smiling that big smile.  But Mick, thanks for thinking of me and how much I could bamboozle my friends, smiling. Have that most beautiful and great day, to love and live with great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Lone
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2009, 05:36:31 AM »

We really should start the lessons with words that can get one into scrapes.  When my sister in law was in America, she asked at a shop for a pusher.  So before the shop assistant pressed the emergency button, she had to explain that she was not seeking illegal substances, she was after a stroller, i.e. a chair on wheels used to transport billy-lids* and prevent them from disappearing.  This is also commonly known as a pram.  Similarly, a push bike, or treadly are the common terms for a bicycle.  

Now, pot plant is another term needing clarification.  I believe the translation is "potted plant" in America.  It is not in anyway a drug reference unless you live near Nimbin.  

Just some grammatical tips for Cindi.  Please note and learn the grammar in the following sentence.
"I would of went to Broady yest'dy arv, but crikey, I gets held up in Frankie by these pack of yobbos givin me grief, then the tram packs it in, so Phil and me's gunna see ya Thursdy, mate."  

Of course, you can easily speak Queensland by adding "eh" on the end of the sentence, or Far North Queensland by adding "true, eh".

You two will be ridgy-didge dinki di sheilas before long.

Lone

*kids, i.e. young children, toe-nippers, ankle-biters, shin-biters.

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SlickMick
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2009, 06:11:04 AM »

Hey Lone ya star ya got it all sorted out for Cindi eh. That Cindi's gunnabe a real synthetic Aussie by the time she has 'er next birthd'y eh. Don't teach 'er too much all at once 'cause she might come a cropper and use the wrong words eh.

Good thing I spent some time in fnq 'cause I know 'ow they talk up there eh

Oh and by the way I think we'll call ya LoneStar see'n ya are one eh. Waddya reckon eh

Slicko the sicko
Ooops almost forgot.... eh eh
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Lone
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2009, 07:10:23 AM »

Cindi can cop a bit of flack; she's as tough as a pack of quolls.  I reckon her aussie name should be Chookie.

As for lonestar, lovely tell yer granny eh  angry

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David LaFerney
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« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2009, 08:41:02 AM »

 

Of course, you can easily speak Queensland by adding "eh" on the end of the sentence, or Far North Queensland by adding "true, eh".



So, Queensland is like the Canada of Australia - linguistically speaking.
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2009, 11:58:06 AM »

Around here we'll call our kids "cute little buggers".  rolleyes

I think that is one of the words not to use down there.

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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2009, 03:13:26 PM »

   You forgot the rug rats Lone.
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SlickMick
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« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2009, 04:43:36 AM »

OK Chookie here's the new word from old Slicko.. hunkydoorie

as in "She'll be hunkydoorie mate"  right, ok, sweet, cool

Now Chookie ya gotta use the new word in at least one post in this thread just so we know ya understand

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Lone
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« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2009, 07:44:07 AM »

Quote
So, Queensland is like the Canada of Australia - linguistically speaking.
 


Davo, then Canada must be the New Zealand of America. 

Quote
I think that is one of the words not to use down there.


People use it to be smart, but it's not nice if you look at the origin.  By the way, the only aussie nick I can think of for you is Sca-bees. cheesy

Quote
You forgot the rug rats Lone.



OK then Yinnar, snotty-nosed rug rats.

Quote
OK Chookie here's the new word from old Slicko.. hunkydoorie



http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/hunky-dory.html   Looks like that one might be american in origin.  It could have arrived here via New Zealand.


Hey Slicko, if we talked Sunshine State, we'd even flummox the Mexicans. 
Well, the roo rats are stretching, so I'd better have a bogie in the gunyah and crawl under me wagga.

Lone


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Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2009, 10:35:31 AM »

OK Chookie here's the new word from old Slicko.. hunkydoorie
as in "She'll be hunkydoorie mate"  right, ok, sweet, cool
Now Chookie ya gotta use the new word in at least one post in this thread just so we know ya understand
Slicko

You guys make me laugh, and just gotta say -- Nope, not gonna do it, smiling.  I have a hard enough time to learn my own English language with correct grammar, throw some other dialect in there, I'm done.  I can't barely even remember some of the words that ya'll have tried to teach me, just can't do it  Smiley Smiley Smiley

BTW I use the word "hunkydorrie" all the time, that is kind of a funny thing. Have those beautiful days, to love and live with great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2009, 02:25:04 PM »

I see the topic is "Cindi's learning Strine". thought I'd add the usual meaning of grouse in this neck of the woods.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grouse
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Cindi
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« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2009, 11:39:58 PM »

wd, hee, hee, hee, yes, grouse, yummy, love to eat those lil' birds, smiling, they make for a tastey meal.  Grouse Mountain, a great skiing place....beautiful days, loving and living life, health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
SlickMick
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« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2009, 07:22:31 AM »

Hey Chookie, I though for a moment you meant Space Mountain in Disneyland and then I read about the great skiing and thought, no, they'd be pretty hard up if they tried to ski Space Mountain

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Lone
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« Reply #15 on: November 26, 2009, 05:21:56 AM »

Slicko you slacko, you can't let Chookie off the hook with her eddicatin.  Learn her up good.

How about learnin her the strine for some of her favourite creatures: chooks and quackers.  Another word for chook is, of course, cackleferrie, and they lay cackleberries.  Some aussie cackleferrie breeds include the australorp, australian game, and australian langshan.  To call them, you stand in the yard yelling "chook, chook, chook, chook..."  Then you get them some nice scraps and they wobble their way to you as fast as they can.

A local quacker is the burdekin duck.  Burdekin duck is also what we call corned beef.  Corned beef is our staple diet, along with vegemite.  It's interesting to note that when a ringer comes to town (ringer- jackaroo, cow-cockie, stationhand, cowby) he will invariably order a corned beef sanger (sanger - sandwich) at the cafe, even though he eats corned beef every day on the station.

Hope this helps and you pass your exam, Chookie.

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SlickMick
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« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2009, 05:49:53 AM »

Then Loanstar we 'ave the other chooks.. the white chook, the brown chook, the black chook, and the frozen chook and the bbq chook. An ya call me a slacko when ya missed the important ones.

Now listen up Loan I thought Chookie might 'preciate some Ozzie po'try so I put a bit of the Banjo's inta me signata.. its the first 2 verses of a Bush Christenin by me mate banjo.. corse it needs some explanin.. the Barcoo is a riva out 'ere an the outa barcoo is furtha out, see.. an a corse they dont have any churches there corse there arnt any pepel to go an prey there.. cept for Mick Magee who lived in a shandy.. oops, shanty.. ere I was thinking ow thirsty I am. Now this Mick was the proud dad of his lad oo had neva been dipped in oley wata, see so he reckoned he should be but see'n the Barcoo was dry and the clergy was a bit of a boozer 'e thought 'e should get 'im named instead of call'n 'im Hey You all the time.

Any'ow I dont wanna get ahead of the story but if ya wanna hear more about Mick an his 10 year old lad temporly called Hey You then, Chookie give us the word. Itsa grate pome

An Loan dont go tellin 'en the endin'

Slicko's no slacko tongue
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Brian D. Bray
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I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


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« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2009, 12:22:41 AM »

 

Of course, you can easily speak Queensland by adding "eh" on the end of the sentence, or Far North Queensland by adding "true, eh".



So, Queensland is like the Canada of Australia - linguistically speaking.

Much like taking the H off your hat and and putting it on your Hass to speak cockney English, eh, mate?
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SlickMick
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« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2009, 12:27:14 AM »

Hey Chookie, where are ya Chookie? Come in Chookie, ova

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
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« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2009, 09:09:41 AM »

Bonza Lone,

Dunno bout goin up to Broady, its full of boguns and westies. Ow bout we drop down to Lygon and play spot the skip? That's always good for a lark. Maybe catch some grub while we're there? Whatchreckon?

Hoo roo
Phil
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« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2009, 11:07:20 PM »

Hey Chookie, where are ya Chookie? Come in Chookie, ova

Slicko

I  forgot to mention that I just love that pet name you gave Cindi - Chookie sounds so cute and just about right for our girl Cindi.
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SlickMick
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« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2009, 01:46:46 AM »

Now Nette, Chookie hasn't posted here for a while so perhaps you could roust her along a bit. Hope we haven't offended her or something.

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Lone
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« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2009, 07:14:11 AM »

Quote
Dunno bout goin up to Broady, its full of boguns and westies. Ow bout we drop down to Lygon and play spot the skip? That's always good for a lark. Maybe catch some grub while we're there? Whatchreckon?


Crikey mikey, we give away our secret that everyone in melb's called Phil.  I'm about jack of that, skiddin down Lygon or Nicholson on me pushie on the wet tramlines at night after a day at the office, yobs chuckin stubbies at me, just to catch the pheasant pluckers or head bellys.  I know ya numba 55 line real good too.  Hope ya get out of ya coma soon mate.


Quote
I  forgot to mention that I just love that pet name you gave Cindi

You have to watch your step in kangarooland, Nettie, or you're liable to get lumbered with a nickname that will stick to you for the rest of your life, like dead horse sticks to a dog's eye.  There's some doozies of names in town here.

( Note for Nettie: dead horse=tomato sauce=ketchup  dog's eye=meat pie)


Quote
Now listen up Loan I thought Chookie might 'preciate some Ozzie po'try so I put a bit of the Banjo's inta me signata.. its the first 2 verses of a Bush Christenin by me mate banjo.. corse it needs some explanin

I got a brilliant brainwave, Slicko old bloke, we could combine the Oz Potry Eddicashun with the Ventrilo a la Oz, on the Fridy evnin Yinnar Time.  Reckon ya could recite the rest of poor old Mcguiness then, Slicko?  i have the complete works of Paterson and of Lawson here, so I betcha Little John could be entertained for a fortnight. 

Quote
Hey Chookie, where are ya Chookie? Come in Chookie, ova

Maybe gone to Syndey?


Lone


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« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2009, 11:29:39 AM »

Now Nette, Chookie hasn't posted here for a while so perhaps you could roust her along a bit. Hope we haven't offended her or something.

Slicko

No, I am sure she just hasn't found your posting as yet.  You know she loves being kidded and she has a great sense of humor.
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« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2009, 05:38:45 PM »

Quote
i have the complete works of Paterson and of Lawson here, so I betcha Little John could be entertained for a fortnight.


You betcha I would Lone . But at last I'm here in the states  :'( I'll have to check on the library here see if I can check out a copy.
More than likey they want have it. I'll have to check see if I can get it on line. I really like Henry Lawson One Hundred and Three.
Henry Lawson "One Hundred and Three" Poem animation Australian


One of Banjo's  The Man From Snowy River - Banjo's Poem
The Man From Snowy River - Banjo's Poem
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Little John
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Caesar men cheered :
" Hail Caesar! We who are about to die salute you!
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« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2009, 07:57:08 AM »

Good choices, Little John. The first video is a little eerie, though!  Lawson had first-hand experience of gaol.  He was very perceptive about human character, but also he had an understanding of some of the darker times because he too suffered.  In fact, he was questioned about his authority to write about certain things, and he retorted with the poem "Do you think that I do not know?"  http://members.ozemail.com.au/~natinfo/lawson/doyouthinkthatidonotknow.htm

Paterson was more of a horseman.  He even trained horses in WW1, and got his name Banjo from a horse.

I think both of their complete works may be out of print.  I got Lawson's from ebay, and Paterson's from an op shop.  They were contemporaries, and even had a competition between themselves about how many lines they could spin out for The Bulletin.  That's why they made some of their lines half the length!

Lone

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« Reply #26 on: November 30, 2009, 09:50:29 AM »

Ah, you guys are a hoot and a hollar, and you leave me absolutely speechless, I really don't know what to say, except, I can't understand a friggin' word you're sayin'!!!  We all love to tease each other, and boy george, by gum, you're doin' a good job of it, smiling.  Wonder how you guys can all understand each other, I am surely lost deep, deep in the words.  Cool to listen to all that Australian jargon, its some pretty neat way of speaking, and do, have that most beautiful and wonderful day, I 've been very busy lately.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2009, 08:18:15 PM »

Maybe we should change the topic to "Cindi's not learning Strine"
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« Reply #28 on: November 30, 2009, 10:42:12 PM »

Lone  Smiley Smiley Smiley, but thanks so much that I should learn this stuff, smiling again, beautiful days, love and live, health. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2009, 08:16:17 AM »

Wrap ya laughing year around this one!


Slim Dusty - No1 Lights On The Hill!


One of the greatest Aussie singer/songwriters of all time, Mr. Brian Cadd. 35 years old this song and as fresh as a daisy.

Let Go - Brian Cadd


This one was an anti Vietnam war song, believe it or not, same bloke, 35 years later with Glenn known to you maybe as LRB. One of my Heroes.

Brian Cadd - Ginger Man
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« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2009, 07:19:56 PM »

I could understand every single word he sang. He is not speaking Strine.
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« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2009, 08:25:37 PM »

Nettie, you have yet to transcribe your aussie cd for us so we can translate it into american for you.  Who's singing on the cd?

Micko, we can't laugh about lights on the hill..it's about a motor vehicle crash.

Chookie's Word of the Day:  tuckerbox = box containing your tucker, or food; lunchbox.  There is a famous statue of the dog on the tuckerbox at Gundagai in New South Wales.  This was based on a poem.  http://members.tip.net.au/~stmcdona/tuckrbox.html  There are many other words for food, of course, such as grub, chow, vittles, dindins.

Lone

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« Reply #32 on: December 06, 2009, 09:54:15 PM »

Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda, you'll come a waltzin' Matilda with me

Down came a jumbuck to drink at that billabong,
Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee,
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag
"You'll come a'waltzing Matilda with me"

Guess it is the same as a tuckerbox, smiling....beautiful days, to love and live, with greatest of health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
SlickMick
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« Reply #33 on: December 06, 2009, 10:50:12 PM »

Yes Chookie, a tuckerbox is a tuckerbox is a tuckerbox grin well done

Now to prove that you have the bones of strine sorted out your task is to interpret the rest of the ditty huh

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
annette
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« Reply #34 on: December 07, 2009, 02:11:10 AM »

Nettie, you have yet to transcribe your aussie cd for us so we can translate it into american for you.  Who's singing on the cd?

Micko, we can't laugh about lights on the hill..it's about a motor vehicle crash.

Chookie's Word of the Day:  tuckerbox = box containing your tucker, or food; lunchbox.  There is a famous statue of the dog on the tuckerbox at Gundagai in New South Wales.  This was based on a poem.  http://members.tip.net.au/~stmcdona/tuckrbox.html  There are many other words for food, of course, such as grub, chow, vittles, dindins.

Lone

.


I have to look for it ,if we still have it
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mick
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« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2009, 03:12:13 AM »

AHA "Wrap ya laughing year around this" means eat this or much later on, try and say this. Strine develops with the times. Mickey Mouse used to mean something that was rubbish, now its strine for the strine, it means Grouse. But then again, if you are in the wrong Pub, they might think you mean rubbish when you mean great.

Stock Standard. It means basic. We took that and turned it into Stock aka something regularly stocked. When rubbish was imported from o/s Stock meant good stuff. Then it became to mean rubbish again when imports were of good quality. Now the youth use Stock fo rExcellent. Youd need to be a Rhodes Scholar to work it all all out.

Many of our sayings have become localised. Ask for a Pot of beer instead of a Middy on the wrong side of the border and you are instantly labelled as "out of town". Youve blown the cover you laid when you parked around the corner. The trick is to speak like a local. If you do that, they cant be sure that you are not related to someone they know, so its first class all the way.

Up the bush, when you go into the pub, and believe me, if you dont do pubs, dont bother going uo the scrub, they will ask your name, your surname. They want to connect with  you. Small Town Syndrome you see.

One person listened to Brian Cadd for the first time today, that makes me happy!  It will make Caddy happy too next time I see hm!

Music is all a bit of a mystery to me. We didnt have as much as a Harmonica between us. To think that some people can play anything they touch and make the World happy is a great gift. I am not impressed by much really. Bravery and Compassion and Musical ability are all that impress me when it comes down to it.

I often listen to random music on youtube. I cant abide rap tho. It should be banned. Everything else is better than watching 3.5 minutes of ads on TV every 10 minutes.


Down came a jumbuck to drink at that billabong,
Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee,
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag
"You'll come a'waltzing Matilda with me"


2009 translation

I was starving and this bloody great sheep came down for a drink at the lake I was camped at.
 
Well I ran like buggery, being on the dole and all and tackled the bastard as hard as I could, fair dinkum I was drooling before as I cut its throat.

I was singing my head off as I stuffed it into my Esky, I was singing:

"Youre in the fridge you bastard, bound for a bbq".


« Last Edit: December 07, 2009, 03:43:05 AM by mick » Logged
SlickMick
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« Reply #36 on: December 07, 2009, 04:23:17 AM »

Hey Micko, that was Chookie's job to interpret that  rolleyes

Slicko
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Lone
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« Reply #37 on: December 07, 2009, 09:06:52 AM »

Quote
tucker bag...Guess it is the same as a tuckerbox, smiling

Box: usually has four sides, a bottom and in this case a lid
Bag: has one big side only
Tuckeroo Tree: bush tucker tree that has edible berries.
$!&^*#@$ mozzie: thing that buzzes in your ears all night and gives you dengue fever, ross river virus, malaria, barmah forest virus.


Lone (smiling too)
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Scadsobees
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Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #38 on: December 07, 2009, 01:06:02 PM »

Quote
AHA "Wrap ya laughing year around this" means eat this or much later on, try and say this. Strine develops with the times. Mickey Mouse used to mean something that was rubbish, now its strine for the strine, it means Grouse. But then again, if you are in the wrong Pub, they might think you mean rubbish when you mean great.

Ok, I think I just realized....they're all teenagers!!  They talk the same language but somehow mean something totally different, the words and syntax mean totally different things, and they change so fast that nobody but one of them can keep up!!

And I can verify that...my brother-in-law and his buddies in Tassy never lost that teenager mentality!! grin
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Rick
Lone
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« Reply #39 on: December 08, 2009, 06:57:43 AM »

Word for the Day:

Whipper Snipper: Thing with a noisy, dodgy motor that men use on saturdays that is impossible to start that ringbarks trees and cuts tops off flowers and breaks down on a regular basis, and which cord is difficult to wind on and usually tangles, but which keeps men occupied and makes them feel useful.

Quote
Ok, I think I just realized....they're all teenagers!!  They talk the same language but somehow mean something totally different, the words and syntax mean totally different things, and they change so fast that nobody but one of them can keep up!!

Sca-bees, no human being can understand what a teenager is saying!  At least there are 20 million of us talk the same lingo.

Lone
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SlickMick
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« Reply #40 on: December 23, 2009, 02:59:40 AM »

Hey Lone, that Chookie's gone bloody quiet.

Now wotdidja say to offend her huh

Slicko

Hope the big Claus is good t'ya
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Cindi
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« Reply #41 on: December 26, 2009, 11:06:03 PM »

 Smiley Smiley Smiley  Just been dang busy, beautiful days, to love, live and share, with great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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