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Author Topic: Warre hive  (Read 1495 times)
DavidBee
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« on: November 19, 2009, 11:24:47 AM »

My interest in TBH introduced me to the Warre hive. I'm committed to setting up a horizontal TBH this spring, but I also have two Langstroth hives with all medium boxes which I plan to use with wired frames with starter strips and no foundation. Except for the frames, this looks very much like a Warre hive to me. In fact, I can't see any substantial functional difference between a foundationless Langstroth and a TBH, aside from cheap, easy construction for the latter and a frame that would reduce the danger of comb collapse in the former. Is there any other major factor I'm missing?
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2009, 12:15:59 PM »

Abbe Warre was particularly concerned over being sure the specific dimensions he prescribed are used.  He believed they were necessary to creating the environment which makes most efficient use of nest scent and temperature.

The langstroth sized boxes far exceed those dimensions.

 I have heard of people simply adding top bars to the langs boxes and using the same practices as warre hives prescribe.  I have no idea how successful any of those have been though.

Big Bear

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Robo
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2009, 01:12:06 PM »

Big Bear is right on.   a round cluster doesn't fit into a Langstroth nicely and leaves a lot of space for cooling and condensation.  Read Warré's book (attached) for the details.  Also keep in mind,  the longer the top bar, the more likely the bees will curve the comb and catch adjacent bars.  With the 12" bars, I find the combs are nice and straight.

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BjornBee
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« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2009, 02:51:23 PM »

David,
I outlined some of our observations on our site. It mentions pro and con considerations. Hope this helps.

http://www.bjornapiaries.com/warre-hive.html
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DavidBee
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2009, 08:51:11 AM »

This has been a tremendous help! Thanks. After reading this I won't attempt a Warre, but I will learn from it and perhaps incorporate some of his concepts.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2009, 09:37:39 AM »

David,
I admire your openness, to see both advantages and disadvantages. My message is not to discourage anyone, just offer some advice prior to I sippin on kool-aid too long.... shocked
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