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Author Topic: question about inner covers  (Read 2476 times)
drobbins
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« on: April 18, 2005, 08:05:35 PM »

Hello All,
I'm a newbie, getting my first package next weekend
question about inner covers
I was told the purpose of the inner cover was so the bees wouldn't stick the telescoping top cover to the hive with propolis
kinda makes sense
but now I'm reading "beekeeping for dummies" (dumb name, good book) and it says not to use an inner if you use a hive top feeder.
Why?
what difference would it make if I use a feeder??
just lookin for input from those who have done it before

Dave
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2005, 08:09:29 PM »

The hive top feeder sits where the inner cover would normally sit. And it will (should) keep the bees away from the top cover. No need for inner cover.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2005, 08:15:48 PM »

Most hive top feeders have a plastic or screen sheild that keep the bees from getting in the feeder and glueing everything together. bye Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
drobbins
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re
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2005, 09:02:24 PM »

hmm,
I guess I see what you mean
they could still stick the top cover down with an inner cover if they just come up thru the opening, but it creates a barrier for them. The feeder does basically the same thing.
hmm,
Man I hope I can get this to work, I got 3 acres out in the country and I'm putting in a garden and got some chickens and the bee's will make it rock!
bee's and chicken
kinda like birds and bee's
I love it

Thanx
Dave
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2005, 09:14:05 PM »

I love my chickens. You will too. My favorite animals on my farm are my dairy goats and bees so I made the joke to my grandpa the other day that we now own the land of milk and honey, we had a good laugh. bye Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
Jerrymac
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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2005, 10:07:35 PM »

I have not ever seen a top feeder. I was thinking there was a screen where the bees couldn't get up to the top cover.

If there is no screen then I would venture a guess that the bees could cross over to the wrong side of the feeder, via the hole in center of inner cover, and drown.
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Finsky
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« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2005, 01:11:47 AM »

The inner cover, or you mean hive ceiling is nothing to do with feeding.

I use inner cover made from wood. It is 10 mm matched board. I have however spitted the board, because these will be twisted by moisture.

Ceiling has a frame  15 mm x 70 mm (splitted board). Over that there is ventilating insulate. I use vasted  bed of foam plastic. It is durable and works.

Over that there is rain cover from metal sheet.

When I feed on the top, I have a 8 liter plastic box and extra 4 mm plate between deep and feeding box. Otherwise bees build waxcombs and feeding box is difficult to get away.

You Americans are feeding hives all the time. I do not understand that? Prosessing sugar to honey, I quess  Tongue
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Saucy
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« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2005, 02:28:55 AM »

Funny you should say that Finsky as I also thought they seem to feed them a top even though they surely have more idealic weather over there.

How is your Spring so far? Warming up slightly here in the UK.
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Robo
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« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2005, 07:53:34 AM »

Quote from: ms132872
hmm,
I guess I see what you mean
they could still stick the top cover down with an inner cover if they just come up thru the opening, but it creates a barrier for them.


They see the inner cover as the top of their cavity and seal the bottom of the inner cover to the top of the super.  They do not consider the space above the inner cover  as "habitable" and therfore have no instinct to seal the telescopic cover to the inner cover. 

You dont want to use an inner cover under a feeder because it limits access to the feeder.  Yes they will seal the bottom of the feeder to the top of the super, but just like an inner cover and unlike a telescopic cover, you can easily shove in a hive tool to seperate them.

Using an inverted glass jar over the inner cover hole with an empty super  is a better feeder alternative than the commercial feeders.  First of all, they are free,  they provide quicker/better access the the bees (bees can feed regardless of the temperature) and they are dishwasher safe. wink

Quart jars fit into medium supers and gallons fit into deep supers.




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Finsky
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« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2005, 02:00:52 PM »

Quote from: Saucy


How is your Spring so far? Warming up slightly here in the UK.


We have no snow any more.

Willow is not blooming in any part of country. The soil is in frost and willow will start blooming normally, about 1.5.

I have feeded my hives with yeast-soya-pollen patty for 3 weeks. It goes well. Also I have had 15 W electric heating in every hive. It goes also well.  I place pollen patty under the inner cover. Hive eats about 500 g per week.

Winter was good for bees.

At spring I pour sugar syrup right in combs if I need. But seldom I need it.
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