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Author Topic: Nine or ten frames in bood chambers?  (Read 3034 times)
alblbr
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« on: April 18, 2005, 11:09:31 AM »

I am a relatively new beekeeper and am going to introduce some package bees in new hives and wanted to know if it was better to have 9 or 10 frames in the brood chambers. Last year I introduced package bees in new hives and they seemed to do well as I harvested about 14 gallons from 4 hives and they have overwintered and seem to be really doing well. I built new hives from plans i got from this site and really enjoy this website as it seems that you know what you're doing.
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eivindm
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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2005, 11:14:58 AM »

First of all; welcome to this forum!!

We had some discussion about 9 or 10 frames in a thread not long ago:
You can read it here
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2005, 11:28:32 AM »

Off Topic. (again)

Quote from: eivindm

We had some discussion about 9 or 10 frames in a thread not long ago:
You can read it here


I've been wondering how one goes about placing the "here" instead of the whole url.  Is this....  http://beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=2362 ... the url and then place [here ....   Or does the t=2362 have something to do with it?
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« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2005, 11:33:02 AM »

Quote from: Jerrymac

I've been wondering how one goes about placing the "here" instead of the whole url.  Is this....  http://beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=2362 ... the url and then place [here ....   Or does the t=2362 have something to do with it?


You just wrap it inside a url-tag:
Code:
[url=http://beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=2362]here[/url]


the t=2362 is a part of the url.  It is a parameter to the viewtopic.php script with the number of the post for viewtopic.php to retrieve from the database.
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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2005, 11:33:21 AM »

Just a thought (although the post Eivindm gave is really helpful) I don't think a hive can have enough brood and 10 frames offer another 8000 or so cells of brood. Times that time the months a year your queen lays and you have a rough count of the EXTRA workers your hive can have doiing duties and going ito Winter.

Now... That said, if you look at the queen rearing and other video links page at http://www.beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=2098 many beekeepers are using the TENTH frame as a DRONE FRAME - by removing all the comb and just installing a hollow frame, the worker build up the frame to accomidate drone cells WHICH attract varroa mites better (in concept at least) than do worker cells.

Either way, you have 10 frames in the brood box. I don't see the need for extra room for capped cells in the brood box, but haing a deeper cell in the HONEY super can be advantagous to many beekeepers.

It is much easier to uncap a frame from a 9 frame honey super than a 10 frame honey super - the comb is extended out and allows for a uncapping knife or other tool to better scrape EVENLY the wax cappings to allow you to better get at the honey.

But in the brood box, I'm a ten frame guy. This of course from a humble beekeeper who has only 2 hives and not dealing with anything larger scale than that. Good luck and read all the posts - check out those videos too if you have not, they are VERY informative and I love the bee boxes they use in the vdeos - try tilting these Langstroths like that and see where it gets you Smiley
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Butterchurn
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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2005, 11:52:44 AM »

Go get some drone comb foundation and make two frames.  Place one in the box as a tenth frame.  When the queen fills it up with drone brood and it gets capped, take out and place in freezer.  Put in other frame and rotate the two.  You can keep rotating from freezer to hive and reduce varroa that way.  Works OK.

Ron
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Butterchurn (Ron)
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« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2005, 12:01:36 PM »

Quote from: Butterchurn
Go get some drone comb foundation and make two frames.  Place one in the box as a tenth frame.  When the queen fills it up with drone brood and it gets capped, take out and place in freezer.  Put in other frame and rotate the two.  You can keep rotating from freezer to hive and reduce varroa that way.  Works OK.

Ron


I caution newbees about using this method.  You are providing an ideal varroa reproducing environment.  If you miss a cycle,  you have just made your varroa situation potentially worse than if you had done nothing.  It is very easy to get side tracked with a busy personal life or by the weather an miss removing it in time.
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Butterchurn
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« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2005, 03:21:16 PM »

Robo,

Point well taken!

Ron
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Butterchurn (Ron)
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2005, 09:03:59 PM »

I'm with John, 10 in the brood box, they need the space to store pollen and nectar to feed the brood and they like to have it close to the brood nest.

Now in the honey supers, by all means go to nine or even eight if you want. I know an old time beekeeper who swears he gets  more honey out of his eight frame supers than people who keep nine frames! Cheesy
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thegolfpsycho
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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2005, 09:17:53 PM »

Start with ten, get them drawn right, then make the adjustment.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2005, 08:40:11 AM »

I plane the end bars down to 1 1/4" wide and put 11 in the brood chamber.  Smiley
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