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Author Topic: Home Brew  (Read 10521 times)
danno
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« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2010, 07:47:11 AM »

I kegged my Bud American Ale clone today,added the priming sugar and will wait about three weeks and chill that baby. I cant wait to sample it cold and carbed. The stuff tasted good that I was putting in the keg.


Have you tried force carbonating your kegs?
http://www.homebrew.com/articles/article12018101.shtml
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Ken
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« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2010, 05:23:32 PM »

I force carbed the first,the second I am still drinking(natural carbed) and I will just natural carb this one .Nothing against force carbing,just got plenty of time to natural carb.When summer gets here,that option may be gone!! cheesy
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danno
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« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2010, 08:52:27 AM »

Ken
Are you using your kegs with the natural carbination.  I'm just wonding if the first few drawn would have sediment?   I have 4 cornies and dont bottle so I have always used the force method   
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c10250
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« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2010, 10:36:21 AM »

I've been brewing for over 20 years now!!  I love the Hobie.  here's a great resource

http://www.brewboard.com/index.php?s=1770370106b1053344ab323912468a34&showforum=2

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Ken
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« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2010, 05:54:26 PM »

Ken
Are you using your kegs with the natural carbination.  I'm just wonding if the first few drawn would have sediment?   I have 4 cornies and dont bottle so I have always used the force method  

Yeah,Im using the corny kegs.I had probably a pint or so with sediment.The cornys draw off very tight to the bottom.When they are empty ,they are empty!!!No pouring the rest into anything bigger than a shot glass!

I've been brewing for over 20 years now!!  I love the Hobie.  here's a great resource

http://www.brewboard.com/index.php?s=1770370106b1053344ab323912468a34&showforum=2



I like this link,but thanks for the other,I'll check it out!!
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/
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danno
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« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2010, 08:16:28 AM »

Ken
I have 4 cornies and was kicking around shortening the drop pipe alittle.  Maybe just 3/4" so it doesn't draw right off the bottom
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c10250
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« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2010, 09:24:43 PM »

I wouldn't cut the pipe.  Don't do it.  As long as you let your beer clear before kegging, it will be OK.  At most, I have one or two pints a little cloudy.  Most of the time the first poor is drinkable.

Also, when you brew dark beers like stouts, cloudy doesn't matter.  You never know.

Ken
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cidersabuzzin
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« Reply #27 on: January 28, 2010, 04:22:20 PM »

I have been dabbling a bit and wondered how many here might make some of their own wine and/or beer?
  I have been making a couple basic wines and got my kegging stuff and started a 5 gallon batch of beer.

Great hobby
I stopped brewing around 25 years ago, also made wine. The beer was of the malt extract type bought by the tin in various types from lager to bitter to dark mild (a darker form of bitter). I acquired a lot of the old type of Amstel and Heineken snap top bottles they were excellent for reuse,a touch of sugar before filling gave the pint a good head. Those were the days! Moved on to wine making, carrot, a hint of whiskey,orange, elder flower delicate and fragrant, elderberry a good red wine full bodied, dandelion another good light wine all with an added tin of grape concentrate to give body thinking about it I may start again with the added prospect of mead! As long as you keep everything sterile you can't go wrong. Never did make any cider though, coming from Somerset there is no need.
Cheers Smiley
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nella
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« Reply #28 on: January 28, 2010, 05:53:22 PM »

I do all grain brewing, mostly lagers, naturally carbonate, bottle or keg. I don't use adjuncts or corn sugar unless I want a particular flavor because they sometimes give the beer a vinegary or off flavor and poor quality beer. When I pitch the wort, it will ferment in the primary fermentor until about one bubble a minute comes through the air lock, and the kraeusen has settled to the bottom, then it gets racked into the secondary carboy fermentor leaving all the trub behind and let it finish it's fermentation, all at the propper temperature for the type of yeast used. The beer should have very little sediment in the keg, I will open the tap all the way on the first picture of beer which will pick up most of the sediment. The sediment is usually more bitter than the beer and it should be just in the first draw, it shouldn't be necessary to cut off the tube.
   Enjoying your own homebrew is like eating your own honey!!  I also had to drink a few mistakes! rolleyes
 
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #29 on: January 28, 2010, 06:36:05 PM »

Where is the best place to get ingredients and kits now?  It seems like a few years ago I could make a batch for less than $20, but that seems to have changed.  I still have all those bottles and everything. I really should put my gear to use.
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« Reply #30 on: January 28, 2010, 06:58:21 PM »

I've been buying from Austin Homebrew and Northern brewer,but have bought a kit from my closest home brew store. Austin and Northern have 7.99 flat rate shipping unless it's a heavy or extra bulky item.One thing to remember,although mail order is not as locxal,many times the faster moving product means fresher ingredients.
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #31 on: January 28, 2010, 08:53:42 PM »

I've been buying from Austin Homebrew and Northern brewer,but have bought a kit from my closest home brew store. Austin and Northern have 7.99 flat rate shipping unless it's a heavy or extra bulky item.One thing to remember,although mail order is not as locxal,many times the faster moving product means fresher ingredients.

I checked those out, and I'll tell you what I like is the rating system that northern has.   If a kit has a 4-5 star rating and several reviews it's probably a pretty good bet.  I made one from the brew store once that considerably increased my resistance to hops by the time I drank 50 bottles of it.  Made for a Long weekend, but nobody else was gonna drink it. Wink
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

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treebee
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« Reply #32 on: January 28, 2010, 10:39:42 PM »

  My wife Lisa is the big homebrewer and I am the bottle prep/taster dude. She really wants to grow some of her own hops this year and or use wild ones, has anyone experimented with wild hops or grown your own.We're looking forward to doubling our output this year.  I found a complete  beer brewing kit at a rummage sale for ten bucks. where as our first one was 130 or so....BEER IS GOOD  grin
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nella
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« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2010, 07:00:38 AM »

To keep the cost down I harvest yeast from the secondary fermentor after bottling as long the quality is good. It will have a high yeast cell count and give a good start to your next batch. The lager yeast I use cost between $5-6. I am lucky, there 2 brew stores close(15 mi) to me for supplies and a brew club. 
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troutstalker2
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« Reply #34 on: February 04, 2010, 10:11:03 PM »


  Tree bee

  I used hops a friend of mine had growing in his yard. the only problem was he had three varieties and didn't know which was which. He grew them as ornamentals sort of. I just combined them and used them as finishing hops. worked fine. I don't know about the wild hops. Who knows what the are or how many generations removed from being something you know would be good. That's just a guess on my part about the wild hops. I have found them growing along the Mississippi river when I lived in Minnesota and have wondered the same thing.

David
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treebee
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« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2010, 01:04:36 PM »

Thanks David,   We have a ton af wild hops around here and  I think I'll try for them once, she found some to order and we're gonnaplant a hop teepee in the yard for the kids to play in.
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Relax, step back, take a deep breath, the finger you save just might be your own!
cidersabuzzin
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vroom... vroom... but more like phut** phut**!


« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2010, 05:38:55 PM »

I do all grain brewing, mostly lagers, naturally carbonate, bottle or keg. I don't use adjuncts or corn sugar unless I want a particular flavor because they sometimes give the beer a vinegary or off flavor and poor quality beer. When I pitch the wort, it will ferment in the primary fermentor until about one bubble a minute comes through the air lock, and the kraeusen has settled to the bottom, then it gets racked into the secondary carboy fermentor leaving all the trub behind and let it finish it's fermentation, all at the propper temperature for the type of yeast used. The beer should have very little sediment in the keg, I will open the tap all the way on the first picture of beer which will pick up most of the sediment. The sediment is usually more bitter than the beer and it should be just in the first draw, it shouldn't be necessary to cut off the tube.
   Enjoying your own homebrew is like eating your own honey!!  I also had to drink a few mistakes! rolleyes
 

Going on the amount of views for this thread, beer is the elixir of life, and so say all of us. Hic! grin
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Whats good for bees is usually good for mankind. Doesn't that mean sharing?
The Ladies could still teach the Borg a thing or two!....and maybe us too, so long as we don't go too far to the left or right and fall off the edge...
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Ken
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« Reply #37 on: February 28, 2010, 08:15:51 AM »

I brewed another Irish Red Ale last weekend. I am going to rack it into a secondary  and test it with the hydrometer today i think.The ferment was the most vigorous I've had so far.The OG was on the target of 1.052 and should easily make the FG of 1.012. I may be ready to keg it next week if it has cleared and fermentation has stopped.  It has a very good aroma in the airlock right now.
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2010, 01:56:40 PM »

To keep the cost down I harvest yeast from the secondary fermentor after bottling as long the quality is good. It will have a high yeast cell count and give a good start to your next batch. The lager yeast I use cost between $5-6. I am lucky, there 2 brew stores close(15 mi) to me for supplies and a brew club.  

I haven't brewed in a while but I used to cap a (sterile of course) bottle full of trub and put it in the fridge, and then use some of that with some extract or sugar in a clean bottle with a fermentation lock to make starter for the next batch.  

It will keep a surprisingly long time like that - it just takes longer to start bubbling as it gets older.  But if it bubbles and smells like beer, it's fine.  

Everybody that would look in the fridge always would hold it up and ask "what is this?"

I've heard that in the long ago German brewers didn't pitch yeast, they just didn't clean out the fermenters all that much and the residue did the job.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

Putting the "ape" in apiary since 2009.
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Ken
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« Reply #39 on: November 23, 2010, 07:02:05 PM »

I have ordered  2 more extract kits from Northern Brewer.one is called The Innkeeper with a starting gravity of 1.043 and the other is called Dundalk irish Heavy with a starting gravity of 1.062. These should both be good beers.
I had contemplated the Spiced winter ale or Pumpkin ale,but these were featured just inside the cover of the latest magazine and I thought I'd have a go at them.
 I have another batch of grape wine with an addition of 5 pounds of raspberries in the carboy bubbling away.

 On another note,Keg Connection has reduces shipping right now.
http://stores.kegconnection.com/StoreFront.bok
I have never purchased anything from KegConnection,but they have good reviews on other forums that I subscribe to.
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