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Author Topic: What has the shb done to our feral colonies  (Read 1347 times)

Online Honeycomb king

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2015, 03:30:33 PM »
That's cool Dallas,  I got that just thought I'd  add it into my blog, reply.
Yeah we have a millipede here that came in on shipping containers not checked in the rush up to the 1956 Olympics and the list goes on. The European honey bee is also not native etc.
How is shb in your area.do you ever observe other insects in your hives.

Offline SlickMick

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2015, 10:48:32 PM »
HCK,

I am curious how these bugs are introduced to the hive and where they live within the hive.

Also what they eat when the shb load is minimal, do they turn to bee brood or do they just evacuate the hive?

Mick

Online Honeycomb king

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2015, 04:51:52 PM »
Introduction is up to you, either front entrance just guide them in. Drop them into the hive during inspection will be a good way for you to see the reaction of the bees. It amazes me which insects are permitted to stay in the hive and not bothered by the bee's.
 Their food sources are various, one of the reasons I didn't put Labidura on my first list was I thought that they ate dead and decaying material (so handy in the garden compost)then I found that their diet was huge in range. They don't seem to go near the brood area at all, will sometimes be seen in the upper parts of the hive and lid, mainly forage in the crumble on the floor. Similar habitat to the shb. Eggs are laid in cracks around wood joins etc and are guarded by the mother. Sometimes they nest outside of the hive between bottom board and pallets or in leaf litter etc. If their numbers get high from a good hatching of young I just flick them out or relocate to another hive. At times I think they have all gone and then they re appear.  As with most insects breeding times seem to be more related to food supply and conditions than a particular time of year.
 So those spots in the hive where you would have seen shb, under crumble on the floor etc you may now see Labidura.  I think  they like the climate of the hive, as it's fairly stable in temperature and humidity year round so to is there life cycle as a result. Perhaps that is the symbiotic part of the relationship they have with the bees.
Large hives, that have clean floors and are full of bees don't need the earwig obviously but they will still be found occasionally on patrol or outside the hive.
Stored combs are kept  clean of shb and to a point wax moth. That is don't put earwig in an old box full of wax moth and hope for brand new combs at the start of the season. They seem to prefer the moth to the larvae.  But there are lots of spider species to keep your stored combs clear of wax moth or a few sprigs of bay leaf.
 Good questions all things I should be adding to my paper thanks. Hope your season is going great.

What's the next line? Now the artful young rogue, while they held their collogue? ?
   

Online sawdstmakr

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2015, 08:29:20 PM »
Thanks for sharing that HCK.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
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Offline Clinto

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #24 on: December 30, 2015, 02:45:00 AM »
Honeycomb King or anyone else, how would you go about finding / purchasing the brown earwig?

Offline Culley

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2015, 03:58:15 AM »
Has anyone else tried this yet?

Online Honeycomb king

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2016, 08:02:21 PM »
In any garden, vegie patch is good. When out bush I tap my hive tool on old fence post or logs that gets them coming out. Or give some kids a bug catcher and tell them 10 per earwig. Old crop or rotting hay etc, "seek and you shall find".
I try to get male and female together into each hive.
Good luck let us know how it goes for you.

Online Honeycomb king

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #27 on: April 30, 2016, 09:57:28 PM »
Hey Jim how's your spring going. Have tried any beneficial insects in your hive for shb control, or varroa too for that matter.

Online sawdstmakr

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Re: What has the shb done to our feral colonies
« Reply #28 on: May 01, 2016, 06:43:24 PM »
I have not added any bugs but I stopped killing the earwigs. My spring has been great so far, bees building fast. Caught 6 good swarms. I just took 10 hives to the farm for gallberry, palmetto and tupelo.
My biggest problem as been having to remove large carpenter ants colonies from the STB and SBB
of my hives. I kept a power cord and a vacuum ready to suck them up because it got to be that the nests were larger than I could crush with a wide spatula. My bees appreciated the vac because when I crushed the ants they emitted a strong odor that would get the  bees in an uproar.
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
"The majority of problems are imaginary and the majority of solutions are illusions."--Michael Bush

 

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