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Author Topic: Hello from Currituck County N.C.  (Read 1193 times)
Leary Sink
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Location: Currituck County, North Carolina


« on: November 18, 2009, 12:10:53 PM »

I have just joined the forum as I am wanting to get started in working with bees. I have not got a clue on where Im going on this new adventure but I appreciate any advice and help anyone wants to send my way. I operate a wildlife damage control business in eastern North Carolina and at times get calls about bees. I first want to learn all that I can about them and how to collect swarms so I can raise them rather than harm them. Im planning on building a few hives this winter so when spring comes I'll be set up and ready to get started.
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specialkayme
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Location: Central NC - (somewhere either in Raleigh, Greensboro, or inbetween)


« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2009, 01:35:18 PM »

Welcome Leary!

I'm also from NC, although I don't know exactly where Currituck County is, and I'm not too surprised. With 100 different counties in the state, it's hard to keep track of all of them.

If you are interested in getting started, I have two recommendations:
1. Find your local beekeeper's association. I'm not sure if there is a Currituck County Beekeepers Association, but you may be able to find one with a google search, or find one close by that you wouldn't mind traveling to. If you can't find one, contact the NC State Beekeepers Association, and they should be able to get you in touch with a local chapter. Tell your local association that you are new, and they will gladly set you up with a mentor, and usually inform you about a beginner's class that you can attend. Until you get there, read up all you can on this site and get a good book to spark your interest.

2. I wouldn't recommend starting in the winter. Its difficult to find someone to sell you bees in the winter, and for a beginner it's even harder to learn what they need and help them make it through the winter. Instead, talk to your local association and place an order for a package or a few nucs. You want at least two. This way it's easier to compare the two hives to make sure they are doing normal things. Learn in the spring, when the bees are gearing up, that way if you mess up (and you will) the bees will be able to take care of themselves. If you learn in the winter, when the bees are struggling to stay warm and alive, if you mess up (and you will) the bees most likely won't be able to take care of themselves and might die.

Good luck and let us know if you have any questions, beekeepers in general are very open and willing to help.
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Cindi
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Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2009, 09:56:57 PM »

Leary Sink, welcome to our forum, so wonderful that you have found us (interesting handle by the way, do you?  I mean, have a leaky sink, smiling).

You are involved in a very interesting profession, and it is wonderful that you want to learn about bees, how to catch a swarm, to bring them home to raise them as your own, cooooool.  Stick around, we love new members and this will be a place where you can spend tons of time learning.  Ask your questions, we love to listen and respond if asked for advice, answers to questions, anything. All questions are important.  Have that wonderful day, great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
indypartridge
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Location: Brown County, IN


« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2009, 06:56:46 AM »

Hello and Welcome!

First, I'll echo the recommendation to get involved with a local club. Clubs are great places to find mentors and get connected with the local beekeeping community. Plus, they often offer beginning beekeeping classes and help for new beekeepers. Check here:
http://www.ncbeekeepers.org/chapters.htm

Second, be sure to check out the tutorials on the main Beemaster page - good stuff! That's were I started about six years ago.
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annette
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Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2009, 12:06:24 PM »

Where are the tutorials on Beemaster??  I looked and looked and cannot find them
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indypartridge
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Location: Brown County, IN


« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2009, 12:23:42 PM »

Where are the tutorials on Beemaster??  I looked and looked and cannot find them

www.beemaster.com

Click on "Backyard Beekeeping Course"
scroll down and there are several topics such as:
"Is beekeeping right for you?"
"The queens role"
"Unique Equipment"
"Ordering Bees"
etc.
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annette
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Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2009, 12:34:48 PM »

Yes, these are the first tutorials I used back around 5 years ago. even before finding the forum.
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Leary Sink
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Location: Currituck County, North Carolina


« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2009, 10:35:53 AM »

Thanks to everyone for the warm welcome and advice.
I have ordered a few catalogs and will contact a friend several counties away that is a master beekeeper and see if he will assist me in getting started. He's a great guy and is SERIOUS about bees. I have found a local chapter about 40 miles away from me and will contact them to see when the next meeting is so I can plan to attend.
Im like a sponge right now, reading articles on the web from different suppliers and here at Beemasters and have already checked out the only two books available from the library.I want to get ready with as much info as possible so when spring does come I'll be ready to start when it gets warm enough.
Thanks again.
Leary
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Sparky
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Location: Hagerstown MD


« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2009, 07:50:22 PM »

Welcome to the forum Leary. Lots of information to be had, here. So much it will get your head spinning. Be patient and ask questions. Like everyone it taught, No such thing as a dumb question, only dumb if not asked. Now is a good time to check out the major suppliers of equipment because some offer the free shipping now till end of year. That will save a bunch of money that can be used to get extra equipment that you will find out quickly, you will need some extra.
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1reb
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Location: Warren,Arkansas


« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2009, 10:23:53 PM »

Hello and Welcome Leary Sink

There is alot of great information on the forum !!
The members here are willing help and answer your questions, all you need to do is to ask


Johnny 
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USC Beeman in TN
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Location: Murfreesboro, TN


« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2009, 10:11:40 PM »

Welcome!  My sister was born at Ft. Bragg.
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De Colores,
Ken
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