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Author Topic: Woman eaten by 2 coyotes, wached by hikers.  (Read 6138 times)
mick
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« on: October 30, 2009, 04:55:13 AM »



A 19-year-old woman died after being attacked by two coyotes while she was hiking in a park in Eastern Canada, police said.
   
Taylor Mitchell, a singer and songwriter from Toronto, was walking alone in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park in Nova Scotia on Tuesday when she was attacked by the small, wolf-like animals.
   
Other hikers tried to scare off the coyotes, described by police as extremely aggressive, and phoned for help.

Mitchell later died of her injuries in hospital.
   
Attacks by coyotes on humans are very rare, although they are known to take down sick and weakened deer in winter.
   
The eastern coyote that lives in the Cape Breton park has interbred with wolves and is somewhat larger than its western ancestors, which typically weigh between seven and 23 kilograms.
   
Park rangers were able to locate one of the coyotes and kill it, Parks Canada spokeswoman Germaine Lemoine said.

Rangers were still looking for the other animal




Ummm let me think, shot one, are looking for the other. That makes two. Hmm even says as much in the report.

Other "hikers" did jack bleep and are nought but cowards. I cant believe this story is true. How can people stand by and watch a measly two coyotes attack and try to eat a girl?

I hope they have nightmares for life, they deserve them, bunch of bloody cowards.
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Bee Happy
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« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2009, 06:38:48 AM »

mick, I read the news release, there was no mention of the two hikers, the article DID go on to admonish people to remember that coyotes are usually timid, harmless..blah blah.
the information on Coyotes I got years ago from an outdoor magazine basically said coyotes are not to be trusted - it also said that there had never been an actual documented attack by a pure (bred) wild wolf (never-mind all the great fiction) on human beings but plenty of documentation of attacks and aggression from coyotes. (wolves would take the occasional lamb or calf...)
you may not see more coyote attacks right away but you will see more of them.
hikers without a staff? what kind of pseudo outdoor types were these people?
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BoBn
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« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2009, 08:16:01 AM »

We have those buggers around.  They have killed a couple of my next door neighbor's sheep this year.  They keep their distance, but don't seem to have much fear of people.

Dogs are probably more dangerous:
 4.7 million dog bites per year in U.S.
 800,000 need medical attention
 1,000 people per day go to ER
 15-20 people, on average, die per year

I have a theory:  In any population, there is a certain percentage of "wacko" individuals.  It seems to be true with bees also.
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2009, 10:06:33 AM »

i can not imagine going hiking alone and not protected.  we have tons of them.  i have chased them across the pasture and they will stop and look back to see how close i am getting.  some of those buggers are big.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2009, 10:43:14 AM »

Kathy I'm with you.  I never go out without protection but am far more afraid of the human predators than animal.  I saw coyotes all the time riding.  It is really creepy when they run just a bit then turn back, look at you like they are sizing you up not a bit afraid, just cautious.  They would circle back & look at my goat (who always went riding with me) and I would have to keep the dog close cause they will lure a single dog into the pack & attack em.  Haley (the horse) would always get excited cause she loved to stomple dogs who bothered us. I would just say "get the dog" & she would lay her ears back & go for it teeth & feet flying!  Being 15.2 hands & 1200# with legs like treetrunks she was quite impressive!  I sure miss that old batt!
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wd
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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2009, 12:34:37 PM »

Amazing! this isn't the norm for yotes as I have come to understand them. Some news storys about this indicate that they are crossed with wolf which would make them larger and more aggressive. unless crossed with a large domestic dog or wolf, coyotes are usually pretty small and timid.

I've seen them many times when backpacking, in small packs, chasing down rabbits and alone, as a rule, they don't stick around, they know humans are there before a human is aware of it. Had a scare once, while fishing for cat fish at night in a canyon in sounthern calif., hundreds of coyotes were headed down the santa ana river bed talking to each other. Even though I was a very nervous by the amount, they kept on going, they knew I was there long before I knew they were there. To this day, I have no idea where they were off too or why.

I'm not an expert on the matter but what I'm trying to say is in my experience an attack like this is not normal. Since my fishing episode, I watch more when out but I've never seen them like that again.


links to this story

Toronto singer dies in Cape Breton coyote attack

some rss feeds about this attack
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2009, 01:17:05 PM »


   
Other hikers tried to scare off the coyotes, described by police as extremely aggressive, and phoned for help.


Other "hikers" did jack bleep and are nought but cowards. I cant believe this story is true. How can people stand by and watch a measly two coyotes attack and try to eat a girl?

I hope they have nightmares for life, they deserve them, bunch of bloody cowards.

I don't think that they just stood around.  They probably heard her screams and by the time they got there she'd already been hurt bad.

I wonder more how 2 coyotes could take a person down....I know they can get fairly big and aggressive, but they are usually pretty shy. 

Unless she was kneeling down trying to feed the " little puppies" and they surprised her... rolleyes But it sounds like she was around wildlife enough to know better so I doubt it.
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Rick
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« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2009, 01:48:55 PM »

A ten pound wild thing with teeth and claws frightens me considerably more than an enraged human of 220 pounds.
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« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2009, 05:15:37 PM »

I do not think the story is true, coyotes are around here and not very afraid of people but there is much easier prey for them to take.

Hopefuly she was a tree hugging peta gal trying to talk some sense into these coyotes......................they must not have liked the message she was sending.

Just kidding so don't string me up!!

G3
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« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2009, 05:35:44 PM »

The eastern coyote is about 2X the size of it's western relative.  They are related to western coyotes and red wolves.
http://www.easterncoyoteresearch.com/

"Do coyotes pose a danger to humans?
Almost all attacks on people seem to represent an attempt to gain or to defend a food resource. In the Northeast, I'm aware of five or six such attacks. In some cases, the coyotes were getting handouts or were feeding at dumps, so they were habituated to humans and associated them with food. Other cases involved hunters. Hunters track wounded animals, and so do coyotes, which makes the two more likely to meet. Instances of coyotes viewing humans as prey are extremely rare. In 1998, a coyote attacked a three-year-old boy on Cape Cod. I've seen no conclusive evidence that the coyote was being fed, so this may have been one of the few cases of true predation directed at humans."
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"Millions of innocent men, women, and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined, and imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch toward uniformity. What has been the effect of coercion? To make one-half the world fools and the other half hypocrites."
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annette
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« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2009, 06:33:51 PM »

I have a trail that I walk on almost everyday up the block from me.  At least several times a month I can see the coyotes up on the hill. They pass through the trail on the way to the pond to drink water. 

2 weeks ago there were 2 just sitting and watching me and I was watching them.  Never thought of them as possibly being aggressive.
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Sparky
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« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2009, 07:07:54 PM »

Just be careful annette. They usually shy away but become more brazing when the numbers are up and they are looking for food. You may want to carry a rambo knife or something when you go on your hikes. Or has Arnold outlawed them too ? LOL!!   grin   They are so adaptable to domestic areas that if left go without some sort of control will become a more prominent problem very quickly. That's why hunters are so important, to keep balance.
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kathyp
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« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2009, 07:16:37 PM »

almost anything with babies around can be dangerous also.  then there are disease that can make animals act in way they would not otherwise.  rabies for one...

want some shooting lessons annette?  smiley
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2009, 07:24:26 PM »

Don't forget kathy it is Cali. so you will have to make sure it is lead free. Maybe she should start with some peanut butter on a sponge but your idea would be SO much more fun!!
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kathyp
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« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2009, 07:32:14 PM »

my backup weapon is a colt tactical knife. 



i think annette could use it without concern.

i never like to kill something that is not a threat, but those coyotes are getting pretty brave.  they have come right up to the house and seem not to be afraid of much.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2009, 08:49:52 PM »

I see coyote; more than likely coyote dies
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wayne
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« Reply #16 on: October 30, 2009, 09:59:27 PM »

 If memory serves it was about 5 years ago when a paper was presented at the mid west wildlife managment meetings in Kentucky that showed over 100 confirmed attacks by coyotes on people.
 The eastern coyote is a much bigger and stronger animal than the small western animal shown on Disney. They can and do take down adult healthy deer and livestock.
 As a professional trapper I get calls all the time from people worried about how brave these animals are.
  This is a picture of a few from a job where they were just too close to the house for comfort. They are big, and the size can be seen on the adults.

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« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2009, 11:27:30 PM »

whew, those are big, that one by the door looks like it has a huge chest. The coyote I've seen here are in the range of about 50 pds or so. I'd like to say a medium sized domestic dog. With what I know of them, coyotes are not to be trusted at all when it comes to small children.

They have been to known to attack adult humans with a single bite or a nip at times. I think the stats were about 10 times a year in the US when I last checked  - but not kill to eat.

The ranchers in the area I'm in now that have problems with them and live stock (sheep) hang the coyotes they kill on fence posts as a warning sign to other coyotes. I'm not convinced that works, I guess the ranchers believe it does so there must be something to it.

this incident has stirred something up in me.





 

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annette
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« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2009, 11:47:48 PM »

I thought it was strange to keep seeing them during the day as I always thought they were nocturnal.  I won't go alone over there anymore. Usually my husband walks with me, but he has been to busy lately and so I go alone.






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kathyp
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« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2009, 12:29:55 AM »

annette, they are around my place all hours.  it's not uncommon for me to see my horses alert on something in the middle of the afternoon only to see a coyote running across the pasture.  i have seen them in my front yard in the morning, and backyard at night.  there's just no telling.

in all honesty, they are probably no threat to you.  if you were to carry a whistle, or other noise maker and a walking stick, you'd probably be good to go.  i don't alter my activities around here, i just keep my eyes open.  i have more concern for the big cats than the coyotes.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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