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Author Topic: Book Recommendation "Buzz About Bees"...  (Read 3701 times)
KeyBeeper
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« on: October 23, 2009, 04:44:23 PM »

Full title is: The Buzz about Bees: Biology of a Superorganism.

You can find it on Amazon for $40 (hardback), $32 Kindle price, but I'd get the book for the numerous high quality color photos.    It's not a book about beekeeping, it's a book about BEES.  It has helped me understand their environment, how they communicate, how they recognize each other and their siblings, the importance of smell and temperature, the importance of the comb and how they use it to communicate.   Interesting note - they use the comb to speak to each other with vibrations.  Problem is, if your comb is in a frame, the vibrations are not propagated across the comb.

It's a shame that so many beekeepers know a LOT about beekeeping, but not nearly as much about the bees themselves.  This book will make me a better beekeeper.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2009, 05:53:06 PM »

You will need to excuse my ignorance in regards to you. You have me at a disadvantage, as I know little about you, or your style of beekeeping.

Instead of denigrating comments such as the one you throw towards other beekeepers, if you do me the favor, let me know what type bee hives you keep, and I'll be very specific in detailing what is wrong with your hives, how unnatural they are, and why throwing stones at others, usually get some thrown back.

I look forward to a intelligent and spirited debate. Which may make you a better beekeeper, beyond the book you so highly speak of.

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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2009, 03:49:18 AM »

I'm recommending a book for chrissake.  If you want to learn more about bee's, then read it - if not, then don't.  That's where it begins and ends.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2009, 07:37:13 AM »

Yeah, I see from your limited posts, that you don't even have a TBH or a Warre hive...to which I thought your comments may be coming from.

I think I may of keyed in your assessment of other beekeepers in the general statement that you make regarding how little beekeepers actually know about BEES. I thought it perhaps a bit arrogant, and a bit narrow minded, since it was coming from an experience standpoint of reading ONE book, but knew that was probably wrong of me to assume. So I ask of your experience.

But please do humor me....you mention that bees can not hear vibrations if comb is in a frame. (a valid issue and a worthy point to discuss). Myself, knowing that nothing we keep bees in comes close to the dynamics of a feral colony (waves, curves, attachments, etc.) and each has it's own flaws when it comes to being nothing close to natural....then what magical hive are you keeping bees in that compensate, and allow bees to communicate such as they do in feral colonies?

Come on now. You did more than suggest a book. You made a statement that you perceive as a flaw with many beekeepers as it comes to comb, you seemingly suggest that a good many beekeepers know less than you (afterall...you read a book!), or at least they know about beekeeping, but far less about bees. And from this, I am curious to the answers and enlightenment you may have.

As you used the word "Shame" to describe other beekeepers, I also use the word. It would be a shame for you to get on this forum, make the suggestions you made, and not further the conversation with what you apparently know. This is a place to expand other peoples knowledge. Not a place to suggest wrongdoing...then state if they want to know more...to buy a book. Are you selling books, or did you come here to help.

So tell me more of what you know.
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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2009, 10:11:09 AM »

bjorn, you seem kind of cranky lately.  things ok?  if you just want to duke it out with someone come on down to the coffee house and i'll go a round with you.  no point in dumping ice water on someone enthusiastic about thier new hobby. 

take some motrin, put on the gloves, come box with me.  leave this one alone.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
BjornBee
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« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2009, 10:39:44 AM »

Yeah, I know Kathy. I've just not been my usually happy go lucky carefree self lately.  flying pig

Talk about killing two birds with one stone! Who your helping or saving can probably be said to amount to two people.  grin

Forgive me if we don't meet up down in the coffee house. I stay away from places that bring out the really nasty side of me, as my strong opinions are usually translated into far more than one person's opinion. However, I do love a good debate about bees, so I'll save it for now and will look forward to some other worthy conversation.

Kathy....your a doll!    rainbow sunflower
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2009, 11:27:18 AM »

Sounds to me as if the OP was simply parroting from the book he likes so much in terms of something the book said about comb vibrations.  in which case, your issue isn't with the person posting, rather the book the prompted the post.

People get a bit hyper enthusiastic when they are learning, or think they are learning, something new.It happens to all of us.

In terms of beekeepers knowing more about beekeeping rather than the bees, it's pretty common that for new people working with anything they get into, they first learn the mechanics of what they are doing and progress into the details as they gain time in and experience.

Big Bear
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BeeHopper
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« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2009, 11:49:06 AM »

 evil


BH
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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2009, 02:45:29 PM »

Hey Keybeeper - welcome.

Just wanted to get that out of the way before someone didn't say it.

Listen Bjorn - here's where I'm coming from.

I've been reading and studying for a few years now.  As you would expect, people who get interested in Beekeeping study beekeeping (how to split hives, how to identify a queen, how to use IPM) and obviously study bees tangentially.  I think most would benefit from a better understanding of the Honeybee and the hive itself - consider it basic research.  There is a huge difference.

It's an opinion given without malice and I'm not sure why you chose to attach malice to it and then personalize it.

 
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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2009, 02:47:18 PM »

Big Bear - that exactly what I was saying.  Thank you for putting it better than I did.

In terms of beekeepers knowing more about beekeeping rather than the bees, it's pretty common that for new people working with anything they get into, they first learn the mechanics of what they are doing and progress into the details as they gain time in and experience.

Big Bear
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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2009, 02:58:01 PM »

I really don't think I deserved this rant and I can do without the message board macho.  You're attempting to incite an argument where none exists.  You'll have to un-wad your panties without my assistance, I'm not going to honor your accusations and assumptions of ill will on my part with a debate.  Get a grip man.

Yeah, I see from your limited posts, that you don't even have a TBH or a Warre hive...to which I thought your comments may be coming from.

I think I may of keyed in your assessment of other beekeepers in the general statement that you make regarding how little beekeepers actually know about BEES. I thought it perhaps a bit arrogant, and a bit narrow minded, since it was coming from an experience standpoint of reading ONE book, but knew that was probably wrong of me to assume. So I ask of your experience.

But please do humor me....you mention that bees can not hear vibrations if comb is in a frame. (a valid issue and a worthy point to discuss). Myself, knowing that nothing we keep bees in comes close to the dynamics of a feral colony (waves, curves, attachments, etc.) and each has it's own flaws when it comes to being nothing close to natural....then what magical hive are you keeping bees in that compensate, and allow bees to communicate such as they do in feral colonies?

Come on now. You did more than suggest a book. You made a statement that you perceive as a flaw with many beekeepers as it comes to comb, you seemingly suggest that a good many beekeepers know less than you (afterall...you read a book!), or at least they know about beekeeping, but far less about bees. And from this, I am curious to the answers and enlightenment you may have.

As you used the word "Shame" to describe other beekeepers, I also use the word. It would be a shame for you to get on this forum, make the suggestions you made, and not further the conversation with what you apparently know. This is a place to expand other peoples knowledge. Not a place to suggest wrongdoing...then state if they want to know more...to buy a book. Are you selling books, or did you come here to help.

So tell me more of what you know.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2009, 03:11:21 PM by KeyBeeper » Logged

Homicidal Mimes: The silent killers
bigbearomaha
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« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2009, 03:17:09 PM »

Keybeeper, If I might suggest, you too could assume parade rest as well.  I beleive in the post directly before I made mine, he pretty much acknowledged letting it go. 

This is mostly people being excited about the same great world of bee handling and getting caught up in what words are used and how so.

nothing to get excited about, As long as we are looking to being better bee handlers, we're all on the same team.

Now, if you really want something to get upset about, When the heck is Kansas City going to please fix the offensive line?

I mean for crying out loud...

Big Bear
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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2009, 03:22:25 PM »

Thanks for pointing out that post Big Bear, I saw it was addressed to Kathy and did not read it.  I'm fine with moving forward - but I felt it important to clear the air.  I can sympathize with anyone who's not "their usual self".  I may be in the same boat - I just spent 4 excruciating hours in the emergency room this morning.  Apparently I have a gall bladder and it no longer wants to be part of me.  I think I'll oblige at my first opportunity.
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Vibe
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« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2009, 04:03:48 PM »

I just spent 4 excruciating hours in the emergency room this morning.  Apparently I have a gall bladder and it no longer wants to be part of me.  I think I'll oblige at my first opportunity.
That part I can understand completely. My wife managed to put that particular surgery off for over a year though - at least until laproscopic options came to a hospital near us. Much better than the previous method which more closely resembled being filleted like a salmon. Gall Bladder flushes do work - though they are not a permanent solution.

Oh..welcome to the board. Cheesy
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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2009, 04:10:01 PM »

Oh..welcome to the board. Cheesy

Thanks - I do appreciate the sentiments.
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luvin honey
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« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2009, 11:15:26 AM »

Hey--Thanks for the suggestion! I'm stocking up on bee books for winter since I won't be able to watch them much Smiley
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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2009, 06:39:55 PM »

Hey--Thanks for the suggestion! I'm stocking up on bee books for winter since I won't be able to watch them much Smiley

I read it an about 3 days, could have done it less except for my 2 visits to the emergency room with my gall bladder.  Christ, I guess I'm really gettign old.
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ziffabeek
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« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2009, 06:49:23 PM »

I love Kathyp and BigBear!! Smiley  Thanks for being so nice!

love,
ziffa

ps.  I love Bjornbee too cuz he's a wealth of information, even if he's a little cranky sometimes.  Ask iddee, I have a soft spot for grouchy old curmudgeon's with a lovely heart underneath.  Wink
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kathyp
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« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2009, 06:52:41 PM »

you guys are just going to ruin my reputation  rant
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
deknow
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« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2009, 10:18:08 AM »

the buzz about bees is a fascinating book, but it is all conclusions without the details of most of the research that led to them.  it is truely a great book (the photos are wonderful, and the text is stimulating), but i see some things that are questionable (which makes me wonder about the rest of the book as well).

as an example, the description of how the bees are able to make the straight lines in the hexagonal cells makes sense (warming the wax until it flows and acts like intersecting soap bubbles), but paper wasps make similar cells out of wood pulp which does not melt...so do paper wasps have a completely different approach to building the same shape with different materials?  could be, but it seems unlikely to me.

also, there is a conspicuous absence of microbes in the picture painted by jurgen, which i think leaves the picture woefully incomplete.

with that said, i love the book, and would recommend it to anyone with a curious mind.

deknow
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