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Author Topic: Solar Ventilators  (Read 3966 times)

Offline weBEE Jammin

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #20 on: November 02, 2009, 09:49:21 PM »
Great ideas.! I think I will try and build an aluminum can heater to try myself. I will try to add axial fans to force the air through. I'm like Robo and like to build things to help my ladies out. Thanks guys and gals.

Offline bee-nuts

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #21 on: November 03, 2009, 12:54:33 AM »
I have several ideas and one is having a small can heater hang on front of hive instead of on top.  I am not sure where to put the intake though unless through the inner cover hole and out the entrance like you say.  I think if one did circulate the air that way one could also make the device a dehumidifier as well and have some type of weep hole. 

We'll see what happens I guess.  So many ideas, so little time.
The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson

Offline weBEE Jammin

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #22 on: November 04, 2009, 09:06:55 PM »
I usually drill a 3/4' hole in the fronts of my hive bodies and supers for better air movement and entrance for the upper boxes. I guess that could be used as the inlets on top, since hot air rises. I can't wait to start building. Tell me about your results.

Offline rdy-b

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #23 on: November 04, 2009, 09:22:37 PM »
I have seen these used on hive tops - http://store.sundancesolar.com/ststsove.html   :lol: RDY-B

Offline weBEE Jammin

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #24 on: November 05, 2009, 10:59:24 AM »
Those are more economical! I am going to try one of the plastic ones for $60 + shipping. They seam simple and easy installation in a 5" diameter hole. Have you talked to anyone using them about results or how well they work? They say they have to be in direct sunlight to work, so not on cloudy days. Thanx rdy-b.

Offline rdy-b

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #25 on: November 06, 2009, 01:58:04 AM »
my take on the hole thing is -i could understand the need for venting if there was a moisture problem-and like you say -it takes a sunyday for the solar vents to work-someone got a deal on this vents and they got a large portion of the bee club to buy also and the price went down with the larger order-seams to me also that you need a teliscopic top for these to work best -my tops are all migratory - :) RDY-B

Offline weBEE Jammin

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2009, 10:09:53 PM »
It also gives the girls more time for foraging instead of spending their life fanning the hive on the porch on scorching hot days. I also heard it helps control beetles and wax moths.

Offline weBEE Jammin

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2009, 11:05:31 PM »
rdy-b, do the bees not propolise your migratory tops and seal off the air movement through your hives? That would be another reason to try a ventilator?

Offline rdy-b

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2009, 12:01:21 AM »
they do a good job with the propollies seal -when it is left to the bees they do a very technical-central air system moving
air in and out of the hive -to maintain temp and humidity-they bring in the right amount of moisture-and evaporate the right amount depending on there needs-they do a balancing act to maintain the colony environment they need for conditions present -cant help but think sometimes our best intentions upset the balance-remember rule #1 let the Bees be Bees-I suppose a case could be made that if conditions are overwhelming-(such as moisture ) that the solar vents help restore that balance but so will a Popsicle stick wedged under the lid  :lol: ;) RDY-B

Offline Robo

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2009, 08:34:23 AM »
they do a good job with the propollies seal -when it is left to the bees they do a very technical-central air system moving air in and out of the hive -to maintain temp and humidity-they bring in the right amount of moisture-and evaporate the right amount depending on there needs-they do a balancing act to maintain the colony environment they need for conditions present -cant help but think sometimes our best intentions upset the balance-remember rule #1 let the Bees be Bees

Amen....

I've been observing a lot of feral survivor colonies over the years,  and I have yet to find one that isn't sealed up as tight as can be.  If heat and humidity retention was not important to them,  why would they go through all the effort?   Some of the strongest colonies I have seen have been ferals.  I think sometimes we need to step back and learn from the bees instead of always thinking we know what is best for them :-X
« Last Edit: November 12, 2009, 07:21:48 PM by Robo »
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline weBEE Jammin

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Re: Solar Ventilators
« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2009, 07:20:05 PM »
That enforces the saying- "Bees do what bees want to do, when bees want to do it!"

 

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