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Author Topic: Approaching land owners to place beehives  (Read 2977 times)
TheMasonicHive
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« on: October 10, 2009, 02:02:08 PM »

Hello!


It's been a good year or so since I've been here last, but I'm happy to report that I will be getting my FIRST colony of bees in spring and will officially become a beekeeper!  I'm really excited!

The problem is this.  I live in an apartment, and have no place to keep them.  I have some places that I know will be willing to take the hive, but I have ONE PLACE in mind for them that would take a long time to explain.

Anyway, I am curious if anyone here has written a letter to a neighbor, or to a land owner to ask permission to keep your bees there.  I would be VERY interested in seeing samples, or to take any advice on how to approach this specific land owner.

Thank you!


Chris
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Christopher Peace
Oakland County, MI

"It teaches us that, as we come into the world rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them without inconvenience to ourselves." - Freemasonry on the Beehive
Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2009, 03:38:47 PM »

I think door to door on a Saturday is a good method.  Or run an ad in the local want ad paper or on Craig's list.
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Michael Bush
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riverrat
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« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2009, 05:03:13 PM »

Hiram look to the east and go to your local lodge I have several hives on lodge brothers farms
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iddee
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2009, 05:07:30 PM »

He's asking about a specific landowner, guys.....

Chris, no letter, email, etc. will ever take the place of a personal visit. A letter in hand, explaining what you will and won't do from time to time may help, but face to face is the only way I would ever give permission to use my land.
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« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2009, 07:58:58 PM »

Ask the landlord if you can put a deck on the roof to put them on. NO seriously like addee mentioned the best responses will most likely come from a one on one formal contact with the land owner. Like Michael mentioned a add in your local area may spark someones interest if you mention the benefits to their crops, unless the area is nothing but corn and providing some nectar of the gods as a token of appreciation.
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asprince
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« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2009, 08:06:24 PM »

All good advice. You will be surprised at the number of people that will be sympathetic to your cause and will help you.



Steve
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« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2009, 12:08:39 PM »

Speaking solely for myself, if someone came to my door and asked to put hives on my place I'd be cool with it. I mean, why not? Its not like there is any work involved. I would prefer to be contacted in person as opposed to a letter. Just be sure that if the particular land owner does agree, you make sure to "sweeten" the deal at the end of the season with a jar or two of honey.  Wink

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« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2009, 08:01:11 PM »

The real trick is how to market a few hives to farmers who will PAY you to leave them on their farm.

I think it can be done, I'm going to try it on craigslist.  Maybe $30/hive/year?
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BjornBee
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« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2009, 08:16:04 AM »

Finding, or "searching" for a place to put a few hives, is but one step that you should be considering.

Is the place I get a good honey site? Is there chemicals and pesticides to deal with? Is it good for me, but also the bees? And so on.

A few points....

*Working farms, orchards, and commercial operations are sometimes NOT the best places to keep bees, when it come to colony health and honey production. If it was not for a pollination fee, I would never have bees on sites such as these. To much non-nectar plantings, mowing, chemicals, etc. If your bees will have to deal with these issues, and the farmer is benefitting...then get paid for it!

*For a good honey site, seek out the "professional" type people (doctors, etc.) who bought a small farm for a few horses, etc. They usually have open fields that bees love all year long. These people are somewhat open to the bee problems and many times welcome the added "value" to their self claimed "estate".

*Contact the county gardening association to see when the next meeting is being held. Most garden clubs have plenty of open houses and meetings open for the public. Having bees on a master gardeners property, is ideal. Many are also in tune with environmental concerns and are sympathetic to not just honey bees but all native pollinators.

*Post a bulletin or talk (go there) to someone at the county Ag office. This is a place where many groups meet, information on various associations and other information is posted. Is there a bluebird association, a bird watching group, etc? These are the nature loving landowners you should be talking too!

* And if you really want to get creative....see if you can get a list of the "CREP" farms or those in preserved status. I have several bee mating yards on preserved farms. Hundreds of acres of
un-farmed pasture lands. No better than places like that.

Good luck!
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2009, 08:35:05 AM »

Most states and or counties have online property maps using google type maps.  They are broken down by lots and will often give some specifying information as to who owns the land.  Look for nice big areas that show one person owning several lots together.  They are very likely maintaining a "farmers market" garden and I will bet they would love having bees around.

Sometimes the maps only give generic information and some type of tax i.d. # you can usually call the county clerk or similar office with that info and they can help you contact the owner.

beyond that, bjornbee has some great points and a phone call followed by a face to face meeting can go a long way.

( I call ahead to gauge interest and make sure  I can stop by when someone will be around.  There's nothing more inconvenient than banging on someones door un-announced.  They may have a night job and are asleep or they may be on their way out and not have time  to talk.)

one thing, It never hurts to ask, worst they can say is no.

Big Bear
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rick42_98
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« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2009, 08:56:45 AM »

I am a first year beekeeper and I too want to expand with a hive on someone elses property.  My backyard is too shady to support another hive.  I approached the local garden club and they received me positively.  I will be attending their meeting this Wednesday so I can give a little talk about it.  I find that most people are generally ignorant about the bees as the President of the club said she was afraid to get "bitten".  I patiently explained that bees don't bite and making sure to not sound condescending explained their defensive stance rather than offensive or agressive.  I think if I clear up any misconceptions and give them some interesting facts one of them will allow me to place a hive in their yard.  Here's hoping and I'll let you know if I am successful.
I like the idea of finding a small produce farmer (like those who provide fruits and/or vegetables for a farmers market) to ask if I can place a hive.  If the gardening club idea doesn't work I will try that.
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TheMasonicHive
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« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2009, 09:02:07 AM »

Thanks everyone.  Again, there is someone in specific I had in mind, and I don't have their phone number.

The basic story is this.  My wife who I married a few months ago used to live on about 360 acres of land in Michigan.  Her family lived there as caretakers for the land when the owners were not there (they have a larger house on the property).

All of her family recently moved down to Florida, and all that land is no longer accessible to us, which is a HUGE bummer, because there is a really nice pond down there, with a cabin, and a nice place to put hives.

It also helps that this place was special to us because its where I proposed.  If I can find ANY way to get hives down there so we can occasionally visit, that would mean the world to us.

Thats the reason I am specifically targeting one property.
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Christopher Peace
Oakland County, MI

"It teaches us that, as we come into the world rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them without inconvenience to ourselves." - Freemasonry on the Beehive
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« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2009, 12:28:46 PM »

I agree, just stop by and start talking to them sometime.

If they seem hesitant, you can mention yard rent, how they can be situated to not bother anybody, what the schedule for caring for them is, how you'll access them, etc.  If they are outdoors type people they will probably be intrigued by the idea.

But if they are "allergic" to bees, they will let you know right away and there won't be any chance of getting bees onto the property  rolleyes.  Then there isn't any point spending time agonizing over a letter.

Rick
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TheMasonicHive
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« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2009, 12:31:56 PM »

Sidebar on that point, how much do Epi pens cost?  I think it would be smart if I'm taking people out to show them the hive that I have them just in case.
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Christopher Peace
Oakland County, MI

"It teaches us that, as we come into the world rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them without inconvenience to ourselves." - Freemasonry on the Beehive
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« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2009, 01:36:14 PM »

Epi Pens are prescribed by your Doctor for YOU !

Some will not prescribe them for you, till you take a allergy Test !

This is prescription medicine, Not to be passed around, at your discretion !!

Should someone use your prescription in a so called emergency ? Good Samartin, Legally ??

This information has been posted a number of times.

Bee-Bop
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TheMasonicHive
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« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2009, 02:00:14 PM »

Cool down man.  You're panicing.

Just say "You can only get them if they are prescribed by a doctor."

Certainly I would have found that out when going to a pharmacy and asking for them.  What am I gonna do when they tell me that?  Go buy em from some guy on the corner?

Did I make myself seem hell bent on buying something while knowing it would be illegal?
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Christopher Peace
Oakland County, MI

"It teaches us that, as we come into the world rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them without inconvenience to ourselves." - Freemasonry on the Beehive
iddee
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« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2009, 02:07:41 PM »

Well, Mr. Peace, there are a number of people here trying to help you, myself included. That post just turned me off. Maybe others will continue, but I won't be posting on this thread any more. I just don't like the atmosphere.
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TheMasonicHive
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« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2009, 02:13:20 PM »

Well, Mr. Peace, there are a number of people here trying to help you, myself included. That post just turned me off. Maybe others will continue, but I won't be posting on this thread any more. I just don't like the atmosphere.

I was asking for help, not to be talked to like someone looking at buying something that I didn't KNOW was a prescription drug.  It can turn you off, and that's fine, but there was a very simple was of answering my simple question without trying to make me seem dangerously ignorant.
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Christopher Peace
Oakland County, MI

"It teaches us that, as we come into the world rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them without inconvenience to ourselves." - Freemasonry on the Beehive
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« Reply #18 on: October 12, 2009, 02:24:17 PM »

i understood your question.  the cost will depend on your prescription coverage.  for instance, i get mine for 10 dollars each.  talk to your doc.  mine had no problem giving them to me since i keep bees.  however, bee-bop, who does tend to be reactive sometimes, has a point.  you would want to be very careful about using them on others or giving them to others.  it is also important to know how and when to use them.  there is a sticky on the forum that gives good info.

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TheMasonicHive
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« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2009, 02:28:10 PM »

It would be VERY obvious to me that something prescribed TO ME, is FOR ME, and ME ONLY.

To assume that I could circumvent this would be assume that I somehow have access to black market Epi pens which to me is not only ridiculous, but hilarious.

I am not allergic to bees so there wouldn't be any problem here.
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Christopher Peace
Oakland County, MI

"It teaches us that, as we come into the world rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them without inconvenience to ourselves." - Freemasonry on the Beehive
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« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2009, 02:30:06 PM »

i understood your question.  the cost will depend on your prescription coverage.  for instance, i get mine for 10 dollars each.  talk to your doc.  mine had no problem giving them to me since i keep bees.  however, bee-bop, who does tend to be reactive sometimes, has a point.  you would want to be very careful about using them on others or giving them to others.  it is also important to know how and when to use them.  there is a sticky on the forum that gives good info.


My doc prescribed one to my when I requested. But when I went to get it filled, they cost $80 without insurance. So... oh well.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2009, 04:09:24 PM »

35 years into beekeeping and I've never SEEN an epipen.  I saw a picture of one once...
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2009, 04:31:28 PM »

only a very small percentage of people are truly allergic to bee stings.  a larger number of us have reactions that are larger than normal.  most have localized reactions that pose no threat.  for the allergic, epi pens (and a new hobby) are a must.  for those of us who have more extreme reactions, epi pens are worth having, never knowing if our reactions will get worse with time.  for others, it's probably an unnecessary expense.

for those of us who like to brush hog yellowjacket nests, they are worth having  grin
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2009, 04:46:24 PM »

Kathy, you're crackin' me up about that YJ hell you just went through...good to see you have a sense of humor about it!

I kept bees with my father as a teenager until he developed allergies to the stings and had to abandon bees. He still comes out to my bee yard on occasion so he leaves me his out-of-date epipens in my frige just incase.

Scott
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« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2009, 06:48:27 PM »

I have an epi-pen. I also know it was prescribed to me. BUT........

I'm sure if I have a person visiting one of my yards going into anaplylactic (sp) shock, that I would take little time weighing the possible ramifications of being sued over the automatic response of saving another persons life. I can't see holding the person's hand while in my other hand was the epi-pen that could of saved that person's life. What a story to tell the widow..."Yes, it is true, I had an epi-pen, but didn't want the risk of a lawsuit. The prescription only included saving MY life....not your husbands....Sorry!"

With this group, you will never read in a headline "Beekeeper saved women's life after vicious attack of killer bees" ..... (*story reads)women would of died without the fast reactions of a professional beekeeper who came to her rescue...

I actually think that having a "visitor" to your bee yard or the neighbors daughter dying after a sting, may very well get you sued anyways.

I've heard about people getting sued after acting as a good Samaritan, and then suggesting that they would do it again if needed, IF it saved another persons life. Makes you wonder what priorities these people have.

For those who have a problem even remotely thinking that using your epi-pen to save another persons life would be out of the question.....then get your land owners where you have bees to have a bottle of benedryl (sp) on hand, or keep a bottle in the truck. Downing a bottle will not save a persons life, but will buy that extra 20-30 minutes to get to the hospital.

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« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2009, 11:06:43 PM »

I bush hog yellow jacket nests, too.  For your information, yellow jackets and wasps and have a separate type of venom than do honey bees and bumble bees.  Being allergic to one has no relationship to being allergic to the other.  I know because about 15 years ago I almost died from yellow jacket stings while biking in the mountains.  Doctors explained the difference of the two groups of stinging insects.  I kept epipens and used one one time.  I went through months of desensitization shots until my body built up immunity.  I get stung about once a year by yellow jackets or wasps now with no reactions and of course, I get stung lots by my honey bees with no reactions.  But, I can relate to Kathyp's statement about how terrible it is being stung by a group of yellow jackets while bushhogging.  The tractor can't outrun them and you can't jump off the tractor because you may be killed by the bushog.  It takes a few minutes to get the bushhog and tractor stopped so that you can get off and run and yellow jackets can keep stinging over and over again.  No fun at all.
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« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2009, 05:29:34 PM »

I have to agree with Bjorn on this one.
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danno
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« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2009, 08:10:21 AM »

I have a few friends that are first responders.   They cant administer shots so what they do is care the pen in there rig and if needed drop it on the ground near the victim, then say hey there's a epi pen!!   What luck!!  That shot would probably save your life.   With my insurance  a 2 pack costs 5.00.   I carry one in my truck and keep one at home.  I dont need them but i want to be ready.   I cant wait for my brother inlaw to come over and chow down on shrimp and crab again!!!   In about 10 minutes he starts looking chinese.  The directions did say that these pens are for adults and they had a smaller size for children
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