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Author Topic: Swarms in the City  (Read 1015 times)
ziffabeek
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« on: September 28, 2009, 02:42:04 PM »

I'm not sure if this question is better here or in the main forum, but. . . what are the chances of finding a swarm inside a city?  I've read people just put boxes out with lures and hope one lands, do you think that would be successful in the city?

I would love to catch a feral hive, but I'm thinking my location will pretty much make that impossible. Sad

ziffa
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2009, 03:04:15 PM »

i have picked up several in the city.  a swarm does not necessarily = feral.  i am pretty sure that those i picked up in town were from others hives.  i have also picked up swarms in the country that i am sure came from the pollination hives in the fields. 

i don't know if there is a websters definition for feral bees, but i don't consider them feral unless they have been without human intervention for 2-3 years   i get some of those from cutouts, and from swarms from known wild hives. 
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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JP
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I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


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« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2009, 05:13:54 AM »

Cities are "Great" places to catch swarms, trust me on this one.
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/YqxuFUJ_r_ihQsPEJ2pYCg?feat=directlink

Kathy I believe some states consider "feral" anything that has left an established man made hive, but I understand where you're coming from.


...JP
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ziffabeek
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2009, 09:30:43 AM »

Wow, that is sooo cool looking JP!  I would love to find one of those!

Thanks for the replies.  Kathy you are right, I guess I didn't really think about the fact that swarms might not be truly "feral".  The whole genetics discussion is what got me thinking about it, and just how cool it would be to catch a hive that might improve my bees! 

Is there any way to tell where a swarm might have come from, or if they are truly 'feral' or not?  I know of hives in 2 neighborhoods, both about 3-6 miles away from mine, but it's not like we're dripping with bees and I think I'm the only one in my immediate area.  Is there a trick to finding them or is it pretty much just luck? 

Thanks again for your replies.  There just so many questions and thoughts!

I better only have a half a cup of coffee next.

love,
ziffa


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Robo
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2009, 02:09:09 PM »

Kathy I believe some states consider "feral" anything that has left an established man made hive, but I understand where you're coming from.


Yup,  as soon as the swarm leaves your hive it is feral shocked

I also know what you mean and personally differentiate by calling anything that has been feral for more than a year survivor.  This is my own personal definition, there is nothing magic about 1 year, nor am I trying to set a standard.
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