Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 16, 2014, 09:57:06 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Carana & Mellifera management differences  (Read 4629 times)
beecanbee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 294

Location: Kamogawa, Chiba Japan


« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2009, 03:12:13 AM »

You might consider inserting frames in the boxes without foundation. 

Yes - thanks for that.  In the spring I might have done so - but now with it being colder, I am unsure if they will be able to draw comb.  I have cerana comb available - but it is mounted on tall & narrow (standing frames), so I will cut it and mount it to the horizontal frames that fit the box they are in, and hope for the best.  The next few days are predicted to have warm noontime temperatures, so I am in luck.
Logged

Paul

“I come from a state that raises corn and cotton and cockleburs and Democrats, and frothy eloquence neither convinces nor satisfies me. I am from Missouri. You have got to show me."  Duncan Vandiver

A boy can do half the work of a man, but two boys do less, and three boys get nothing done at all. Smiley

(False) Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.  - Samuel Johnson
kempf
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5

Location: Taiwan


« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2009, 08:30:36 AM »

Apis cerana ----asian bee , smaller than apis mellifera .
My A.cerana colony was destroyed by giant hornet
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 08:47:18 AM by kempf » Logged
Lone
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1034


Location: North Queensland


« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2009, 01:02:17 AM »

Hello Kempf,

I thought the apis cerana were able to ball the giant hornet, and kill it? 

Lone
Logged
beecanbee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 294

Location: Kamogawa, Chiba Japan


« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2009, 01:21:24 AM »

Hello Kempf,

I thought the apis cerana were able to ball the giant hornet, and kill it? 

Lone

They will do so when attacked one by one - but if a whole bunch come at once and are not restricted by a reducer, cage, or netting - the hornets will win the battle.  Come autumn, I add metal cages (from rat traps) and netting to slow the hornets down.  Next week I will remove it all and do a final cleaning for the winter.  I also wrap the base of hive with hardware wire to keep the hornets from tearing off the wood where it is moist and thus easier to gain entrance.

Kempf - please let us know where you are... your profile needs updating.  Better luck next year.  Up above somewhere I have described my trials with the hornets.  It is a constant battle - and to be successful should start in Spring when the hornet queens are on their own.  You kill a queen and you have eliminated hundreds of hornets.
Logged

Paul

“I come from a state that raises corn and cotton and cockleburs and Democrats, and frothy eloquence neither convinces nor satisfies me. I am from Missouri. You have got to show me."  Duncan Vandiver

A boy can do half the work of a man, but two boys do less, and three boys get nothing done at all. Smiley

(False) Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.  - Samuel Johnson
kempf
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5

Location: Taiwan


« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2009, 07:14:45 PM »

Lone / beecanbee :
My a.cerana is a small colony(only 2 frames). I finded 3 giant hornet corpses at hive bottom. But my colony is too small to protect itself . When I open the hive , 9 giant hornet fly out . The giant hornet like troop. Their attack is not along.
The Asian giant hornet is too terrible. I measure the worker giant hornet , the length of body is 4.0 cm . It is the biggest wasp of the world. I will catch hornet queen next Spring. Catching one hornet queen = Catching one colony hornet.

I am come from Taiwan---in East South Asia .I keeped Apis cerana and Apis mellifera many years ago. But I have no any colony now.
I will refresh my data.
Here........it is difficult to post a photograph. Oh~~~~

bellow is written in another post , I re-post over here again.
Apis cerana character :
1. They are fear of light ---- don't need to open the window
2. not easy angry------but easy disorder
3. fly very fast
4. like to concentrate at the bottom of frame
5. when small larva appear in queen cell , the colony will  easy get angry
6. not to use smoke , water fog is better than smoke .smoke will lead to disorder and angry
7. pollen coming is normal . If no pollen coming , your colony is in big trouble (loss queen/disease/hornet attack...ect)
8. Don't need to feed sugar water or feed few all the year-----I think this is the best excellence of a.cerana .
    In my experiene : I feed 1 kg sugar within 30 days in November (temperature 15~23 degree C) , my 4 frames colony become to 6 frames and start to develop many drones and few queens .......and swarm in next month.

In the other hand .... If you keep Apis mellifera ligustica , you need to feed 50 kg sugar in one year for 10 frames colony .

9. My friend tell me that 80% A.cerana colony run away in fall of the year. I don't know why bee will run away.
   Do you have the same situation?

I thinlk China and Japan maybe have more data about Apis Cerana . China beekeeping a.cerana more than one million colony.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2009, 08:03:54 PM by kempf » Logged
Lone
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1034


Location: North Queensland


« Reply #25 on: December 05, 2009, 08:58:36 PM »

Hello Kempf, thanks for all that wonderful information.   I hope you can get some more bees soon. 

You may have heard that Apis cerana was found in Australia.  Scientists are mainly concerned that the Varroa jacobsoni mite is common on the cerana, and has been seen to cross over onto the Apis mellifera in PNG, just north of here.  The movie we saw last week showed that the hives have been devasted in PNG because of the mite. 

I haven't heard about any recent colonies of Apis cerana here.  They try to seek out and eradicate them.  The ones that they did find didn't have the mite.  In your experience, do many colonies of Apis cerana have the Varroa jacobsoni mite?

Lone
Logged
beecanbee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 294

Location: Kamogawa, Chiba Japan


« Reply #26 on: December 06, 2009, 09:33:10 PM »

Kempf - thanks for the update, and welcome.

Part of the trick to having cerana hives survive – is to leave plenty of honey for them to use.  I try to leave at least 50% or so of the honey no matter when I harvest, and if I find that I would only be harvesting one or two frames, I will generally leave it all for them to use.  This means that I generally only harvest from just over a half of the hives.

The most important lesson for me to learn was when to inspect and clean, and when to leave them alone.  If you open and inspect weekly, as you might with mellifera – the cerana bee will abscond for sure.  If you do not open and clean, then the wax moth will gain and the hive will be ruined.  So I do an early spring, and a late fall cleaning.  Then during the summer, I do a monthly inspection which includes a cleaning if it looks like it needs it, but might just end with just a peak inside if it looks like they are doing their own cleaning.  At the same time I will add one or two frames of foundation if they are mostly filling out the existing frames.

For hornet control – it is important to slow down the access by the hornet – so that only one gains access at any time.  I cut a wire cage rat-trap in half and then have two metal wire cages that I place directly over the entrance in late summer.  This cage allows the bees to exit at any place within the cage, and avoid the waiting hornet.  As a second barrier, I use nylon netting that has been woven with the right size holes to allow the cerana bee to crawl thru (but not a hornet).  The net should be loosely draped over the hive, and not drawn tight.  If it is tight, then the hornet can use its strength to pull itself thru the net, and into the hive.

A special trick you can do on the large hornet is to catch them on the sticky rat catch paper.  Once one hornet has been stuck onto the paper by you, then many more will get stuck there naturally by themselves.

Also - like you, I try to catch or kill the hornet queen in the spring.  This year I believe I got five of them.

By controling the hornet, I believe that you can reduce the loss to below 80%.  In the late autumn (after the hornets have died), I still have more than 80% cerana in their hives.

With all of this, I still lose maybe half of the hives over the winter, but in the spring a fourth or so will repopulate from swarms, and by late summer most hives will have bees.

This next Saturday, I will do my final pre-winter cleaning, and I will remove the cages and nets.
Logged

Paul

“I come from a state that raises corn and cotton and cockleburs and Democrats, and frothy eloquence neither convinces nor satisfies me. I am from Missouri. You have got to show me."  Duncan Vandiver

A boy can do half the work of a man, but two boys do less, and three boys get nothing done at all. Smiley

(False) Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.  - Samuel Johnson
kempf
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5

Location: Taiwan


« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2009, 11:55:44 AM »

Hello Lone :
I am surprising Apis cerana appear in Australia . I think the Varroa jacobsoni mite will follow a.cerana into Australia and will effect Australia apiculture . Because Australia export many Apis mellifera colonies to other country.
In my experience , I "Never" finded any Varroa jacobsoni mite in my "normal" colony of Apis cerana .
But I have been finded few Varroa jacobsoni mite in queen-less colony --- just few . Beause the workers of queen-less colony lay eggs----worker's egg will hatch drone.Varroa jacobsoni mite eat drone larva .I do nothing for queen-less colony . When the larva become adult , the mite will disappear.

kempf
Logged
kempf
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5

Location: Taiwan


« Reply #28 on: December 07, 2009, 12:26:45 PM »

Hello beecanbee :
Thanks for your experience.
In summer 2009 , I lost all of my Apis cerana hive because of giant hornet attack . My friend near me is also lost all of his hive(4 colony) by hornet attack.
----------------------
I inspect my hive every 2 days. I know it is not good , but ........ I just can not stop to look them.
My Apis cerana never run away by my often open hive. I lost my Apis cerana just by hornet attack and new queen mate failure.
The major flowers bloom season is in spring and fall in north Taiwan . So bee will grow up in spring and fall.
I will clear hive in spring/summer/fall. The weather is very hot , so the moth grow big and fat.......very terrible.
The winter temperature is worm in Taiwan. Apis cerana still have egg in winter. Keeping enough honey is important for bee in winter. Most of colonies will cross winter successfully. Winter is not a big trouble for us.
----------------------
I am interesting in Japan's Hive type and size. From the internet data.......I think Japan hive type is the best for apis cerana. It is easy to clear , easy to harvest and don't need much inspection.
----------------------
May you have good harvest every year.
Logged
paradoxbox
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1

Location: Tokyo, Japan


« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2009, 01:22:52 PM »

howdy, new member here, living in japan as well. beecanbee i was wondering if you could post any pictures of your setup?

i am looking at getting set up for beekeeping in the next year or two but dealing with the giant hornets has been something i was concerned about.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.246 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page March 10, 2014, 10:41:30 PM
anything