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Author Topic: Terramycin or Tylan  (Read 3321 times)
bee-nuts
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« on: September 09, 2009, 01:44:53 AM »

I have heard that AFB has become resistant to terramycin and that Tylan is the way to go.  Also where do you by the stuff.  I went to our local Farm and Fleet store today and checked just to see if they have the stuff and they had Terramycin in pill form for cows and in the powder bags for chickens but were out of it.  The guy there said they have be having trouble getting the bag stuff for some reason lately.  I don't know why that would be.  He said that the only way they had tylan now was injectable so that wont work for me.

Anyway, Im just wondering what options I have for this stuff and what works best.  Yes of course I can order it but if I can get it locally and cheaper from a local retailer why go through dadant or Mann lake or whoever.  Ya Know!!

How about Fumagillian?  Is this stuff for bees only or is the antibiotic again a common livestock treatment?

Other good info?

Thanks for info
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danno
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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2009, 08:38:08 AM »

The 6.4oz Terramycin bag that were labeled for bee's are no longer being made.  The replacement is alot stronger and not labeled for bee's and dont include a mixing rate.  This leaves the premixed  or the  big bags of 100MR available at bee supply houses.  Tylan should only be used on colonies with FB that are not responding to terramycin. 
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bee-nuts
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2009, 07:28:36 PM »

"The 6.4oz Terramycin bag that were labeled for bee's are no longer being made." 

That sucks big coconuts!

"Tylan should only be used on colonies with FB that are not responding to terramycin."

So you would not use either unless you have an outbreak.  Once you have it, you have to burn everything.  I was told to feed it as an immunization kind of thing so you dont have to worry about getting AFB.  Bad idea you think?


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The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2009, 08:17:12 PM »

i think most of us have gone away from prophylactic treatment. i believe the use of terramycin has been banned in the EU, but maybe some of our European members can verify that.

thought i'd add this.

http://www.agriculture.state.pa.us/agriculture/CWP/view.asp?A=3&Q=128089

short and to the point.
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 Alexis de Tocqueville
bee-nuts
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2009, 09:34:39 PM »

kathyp

Thanks for the link.  It is kind of confusing though.

It says once a colony has it you will never get rid of it.  If you have it and you treat, it will come back as soon as you stop.  However it says you can treat with it as a preventive thing.  Not sure if that makes sense.

It also sounds like you are at risk if you get bees from anyone who treats for it.  As soon as you stop the treatments you could find yourself infested with AFB.

I have had no AFB yet.  If I make it through spring without an outbreak it sounds like I got lucky.  I plan on destroying all old dark comb next year too.

It sounds like either use it all the time or don't at all to me.  I'm not sure what to do with what I have now.  If they had AFB they should have already had an outbreak if they were contaminated.  Right?
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kathyp
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2009, 09:56:54 PM »

However it says you can treat with it as a preventive thing.  Not sure if that makes sense.

that was my thought when i decided not to treat.  some areas have lots of it.  some have very little.  it's something to watch for and be aware of, but not lose sleep over.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
bee-nuts
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« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2009, 11:00:35 PM »

Thanks again kathyp

Guess all I have to do now is make up my mind.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2009, 08:18:24 PM »

>I have heard that AFB has become resistant to terramycin and that Tylan is the way to go.

Tylan is a very long lived chemical as opposed to terramycin.  The AFB may have become resistant to terramycin, but my bet is the beneficial microbes have as well:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm#ecology
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmorethan.htm

And Tylan is only approved for use against terramycin resistant AFB.

>Anyway, Im just wondering what options I have for this stuff and what works best.

What works best is to never use any antibiotics.  Even the experts are finally coming around to this.  I've been using no antibiotics for the last 33 years.

>How about Fumagillian?  Is this stuff for bees only or is the antibiotic again a common livestock treatment?

Fumagillan has been outlawed throughout the world because it causes birth defects.  It is ONLY allowed in beekeeping and ONLY in the US, Canada and the UK.  The EU, Australia and New Zealand have outlawed it.  I have never used it in 35 years of beekeeping.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesterms.htm#fumidil
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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