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Author Topic: Fall feeding  (Read 2904 times)
beryfarmer
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« on: September 07, 2009, 10:55:15 AM »

My bees are sucking down 2 qts 2:1 syrup a day for a couple of weeks now.  Now they are all congregated in my empty super where i put my jars-  a LOT of bess- whole surface covered.  They are also getting a bit aggressive.  Is it possible that opening up the top to feed them every day has gotten them a bit upset???

Trying an entrance feeder to try and get them down below  as well as an alternative.

Dont know ehre all the syrup is going -  seems into brood and not wax or storage....

live around philadelphia.
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chickade
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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2009, 12:12:26 PM »

I'm also in the Phila area- My bees have no honey stores, only brood.  They are also using two quarts a day.  I called Mike at Bjorn Apiaries and he said that lots of bees in the area are starving- there was so much rain they didn't get enough pollen, even though there was lots of pollen around. 
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2009, 02:22:30 PM »

Quote
Now they are all congregated in my empty super where i put my jars

are you putting your jars on top of an inner cover?  that helps.  when i pull my jars off to refill, i take the empty box off and put the top on the hive.  when i go back to replace the jars, they are not so hard to deal with.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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David LaFerney
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2009, 05:39:07 PM »

I've been feeding using inverted quart jars through a hole in the inner cover, but the hole is covered with a piece of screen wire - so no bees whatsoever get into the empty box.  Instead of stapling the screen to the inner cover I have it stapled to a small piece of plywood with a hole in it  that just sits in there.  This makes feeding really easy, and they don't seem to have any trouble at all feeding through the screen wire. 
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mswartfager
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2009, 07:22:27 PM »

David,
Would you have picture of that (your screen feeder)?

Mark
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beryfarmer
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« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2009, 09:35:59 PM »

yes, feeding through inner cover- 2 qt jars on pieces of wood.

today filled entance feeder with 1 qt and smoked the hive heavily

looked in the top hive body and they are really putting away the syrup- feel better now-they had to build comb because was new pierco frame.

put another qt on the inner cover.  the bees were better.  still got stung 2x.  didnt hurt much

just the natrual reaction to swat them-ending up cutting myself with the hive tool trying to shoo the bees away.

decided to put a couple of empty frames in the supper to see if they will start building comb on it.

later in the day it was sunny---huge number of bees going in and out of the front- almost a cloud

they dont mind me going next to the hive.  just dont like me going inside.

0verall i feel better that the second hive boddy is pretty heavy- 8 frames full.

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Bee-Bop
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« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2009, 09:52:54 PM »

This is how I feed;
Can hold 3 jars over screens, add extra box and expandable top, bees can't get out, don't disturb them !
In the summer and winter it ventilates the hive !

Bee-Bop

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iddee
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« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2009, 09:55:49 PM »

>>>>later in the day it was sunny---huge number of bees going in and out of the front- almost a cloud<<<<

That was robbing by other hives. If you don't remove the front feeder and stop the robbing, they will be dead in 2 days.

>>>>decided to put a couple of empty frames in the supper to see if they will start building comb on it.<<<<

IF they start building comb, it won't be on the frames. It will be suspended from the lid. You will have a mess. NEVER, NEVER, give bees empty space in a hive. They will fill it with comb if they are drawing comb. They much prefer to draw natural, and will never use frames if they have a choice.
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2009, 10:04:42 PM »

David,
Would you have picture of that (your screen feeder)?

Mark


Sure.  It's pretty simple -


The small board with the screen on it can just sit over the hole in the inner cover, but you have to remember to hold it down when you lift the jar because they will be propolised together. I have it screwed down on one hive which is actually pretty handy.



Punch a few small holes in the jar lid of course. A medium hive body is just the right size for this - if your inner cover has an "escape" notch you will want to plug it.  You can keep an extra jar or two in there if you like and the temperature of the syrup will be right when you change jars - don't want to give them cold syrup right out of the fridge.  I just use one top with holes in it, and swap lids when I change jars.


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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

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David LaFerney
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« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2009, 10:12:07 PM »

BeeBop -  that looks pretty cool.  I can really see how the ventilation would help in the summer, but in the winter it seems like it would let out an awful lot of heat.  Do you fill it with rags or something or just use it wide open like that?  I still haven't decided what I want to do to get through my first winter.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

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beryfarmer
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« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2009, 10:44:44 PM »

dont think it was robbing- have pretty strong hive
no fighting- no dead bodies

seen amost that many bess previously- just amazed at the number of bees

with regards to the comb building.  they have not ever built comb in the empty super i have used to house my feeder qt jars.  dont see why they would now.

i like the screen idea for the top cover to feed the bees.--solves my problems

before my whole super was lined with bees waiting to be fed.......
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Sparky
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« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2009, 10:26:21 PM »

Hey Bee-Bop is that a entrance in the picture that can be opened or closed to go in above the bottom screen area ?
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ziffabeek
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« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2009, 09:26:59 AM »

My bees are doing the same thing,  just heaps of them in the empty super where I put my feeder container.  If it doesn't bother me, is this a bad thing?  I just change the feeder and they don't seem to mind.  Was a little concerned they were over crowded but they still have unfilled comb below.  Is it better to screen them off, or is it ok to let them hang out there?

Thanks,
ziffa
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kathyp
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« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2009, 10:40:18 AM »

mine hang out there because i was not clever enough to think of the screen  grin

when i put my top on the empty box, i leave it cracked open a bit.  by  night, the bees have gone around and back into the hive.

they are not up at the top because they are crowded.  they are they because they are looking for their food!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
ziffabeek
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« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2009, 04:19:24 PM »

Cool, thanks!

Hmmm, maybe I can teach them to sit up and beg?? cheesy
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fr0sty
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« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2009, 08:46:38 PM »

I've been feeding my bees with a hive-top feeder and they've really been sucking it down! They go through about 3 gallons a day.
It seems like most of you guys are using jars/bottles which have a somewhat more controlled drip rate.
Is it possible to feed too much too fast?
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2009, 09:11:06 PM »

I've been feeding my bees with a hive-top feeder and they've really been sucking it down! They go through about 3 gallons a day.
It seems like most of you guys are using jars/bottles which have a somewhat more controlled drip rate.
Is it possible to feed too much too fast?

3 gallons a day for one hive?  Are you sure you're only feeding your bees?  I really don't know, but that sounds like an awful lot.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

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buzzbee
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« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2009, 09:42:51 PM »

I've been feeding my bees with a hive-top feeder and they've really been sucking it down! They go through about 3 gallons a day.
It seems like most of you guys are using jars/bottles which have a somewhat more controlled drip rate.
Is it possible to feed too much too fast?
Is your top cover tight over the top feeder? There maty be other bees getting under the cover and getting to to he syrup. The only place bees should be able to get access is from the super or brood box directly below the feeder. Are you using an entrance reducer while the feeder is on?
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fr0sty
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« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2009, 11:42:49 PM »

I've been feeding my bees with a hive-top feeder and they've really been sucking it down! They go through about 3 gallons a day.
It seems like most of you guys are using jars/bottles which have a somewhat more controlled drip rate.
Is it possible to feed too much too fast?
Is your top cover tight over the top feeder? There maty be other bees getting under the cover and getting to to he syrup. The only place bees should be able to get access is from the super or brood box directly below the feeder. Are you using an entrance reducer while the feeder is on?

The feeder I have is: Feeder
I have an empty medium around it and then the outer cover on top of that.
What I'm feeding may be more like 2.5 gallons, but I still feel like it's a lot, especially because I know there's goldenrod and japanese knotweed blooming around right now.
But the feeding hasn't been everyday, it's when I go home for the weekends and I feed on Saturday and Sunday.
Also, I don't have an entrance reducer on it, should I?
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« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2009, 06:49:11 AM »

Frosty,
Make sure the outer cover sits tight all the way around the top of this particular feeded. I have seen a lot of gaps where bees can get in the top on a friends feeder.Also be sure there is no way for the bees to get around to the upper sides of the feeder through the cracks at the corners of the feeder.
And I would seriously consider a entrance reducer if I was feeding,especially if it is not a real strong hive.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2009, 07:13:07 AM by buzzbee » Logged
njtoo
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« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2009, 09:22:12 AM »

I'm located in South Jersey only about 15 minutes from Philly. I have 15 hives that are several years old and in good shape. However, virtually no honey stores as of yesterday. So It seems we are all in the same boat in the SE PA area. I started feeding last month and had to take the feed off as I was getting VERY HIGH numbers of SHB.
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Sparky
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« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2009, 05:00:24 PM »

Hello frOsty. I have used this same feeder and have never had bees get into it. Like buzzbee said, make sure your cover fits tight on the box that is on the feeder. One question though. How did you get 2.5 gal. of feed in a plastic hive top feeder that holds 1.25 gallons of feed ?
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Bee-Bop
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« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2009, 07:43:58 PM »

DavidLaFerney;
I place a piece of cardboard over each hole then fill with wood mulch, {all of which absorb moisture} if necessary can brush chips aside and remove cardboard to feed.

Sparky;
That closable entrance is Under The Board, it is left open at all times except when feeding !

Bee-Bop
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fr0sty
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« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2009, 11:13:34 AM »

Hello frOsty. I have used this same feeder and have never had bees get into it. Like buzzbee said, make sure your cover fits tight on the box that is on the feeder. One question though. How did you get 2.5 gal. of feed in a plastic hive top feeder that holds 1.25 gallons of feed ?

I'm almost 100% sure bees aren't getting in from the top, it's completely sealed.

Also, I refilled 3 times, not all at once.
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ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2009, 09:58:47 PM »

I feed internally using chick feeders.  To make sure I do not have robbing of my nucs, I only put the feeder in at night.  By morning the nuc bees have drained the feeder and so the "smell" of syrup has hopefully deminished.  I have not had a robbing problem since starting night feeding.  I can leave the empty feeder in during the day while at work.  I usually fill it around 7pm.  Any comments or anyone see any problems with night feeding?  Chick feeders hold around 2.5 cups.
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