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Author Topic: Using old hives?  (Read 1463 times)

Offline VolunteerK9

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Using old hives?
« on: September 02, 2009, 11:33:24 AM »
 I have been lurking around on this site now for a while and have read all that I can on Bee Keeping. I plan on getting started with 2-3 packages this upcoming Spring so in a nutshell I'm not even a Newbie BeeK. My question is this, I think I may be able to obtain a large quantity of supers and other equipment that have been stored in a barn, unused, for at least 20 years if not more.  I have read that AFB can lay dormant for years just waiting on a fresh host to come along. I am torn from trying to save a little $$$ up front however do not want to doom my hobby from the start. Is it worth it or not?

Offline Eshu

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2009, 11:41:48 AM »
Assuming the boxes are in good shape, I would probably use the boxes (after scorching) but not the frames.  I would start with new frames and foundation.  What size boxes are they?  I'm not sure I would bother with them if they were shallows...

Offline riverrat

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2009, 11:43:48 AM »
I usually try to stay away from used woodenware for the same reasons  you stated. You can go in and scorch the wood to kill the spores. However By the time you buy used equipment and scorch you are usually better off to buy new just my two cents worth
never take the top off a hive on a day that you wouldn't want the roof taken off your house

Offline sc-bee

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2009, 11:44:15 AM »
>I have read that AFB can lay dormant for years just waiting on a fresh host to come along.

It will lie around for decades.

Most folks when using old equipment look at the operation it was previously used in. The reputation of the former beekeeper and the health of his hives etc. This would probably be hard to do if the equipment has been in storage for twenty years.

Some folks will say scorch the equipment with a torch to kill any disease. Alot of scorching if alot of equipment.

I guess that leaves a gut feeling call!
John 3:16

Offline sc-bee

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2009, 11:46:13 AM »
By the time I pecked away :-D --- two other responses.
John 3:16

Offline JsHoney

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2009, 06:23:42 AM »
I'm with Eshu if you can get then cheap and there in good condition, go a head scorch them. The call is up to you spend money on new or take the time and scorch the old.

Offline charmd2

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2009, 07:19:21 AM »
I'd use them and take my chances. :)  But, I would go into it upfront well aware that I could suffer loss.   
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Offline kathyp

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2009, 11:17:11 AM »
i have been able to get good used equipment also.  i agree about using new frames though.  the frames don't hold up as well to storage, and if you want to use foundation, it can be really hard to deal with old, used frames.

scorch   boxes.  scorching is not hard and doesn't take to much time.  if you don't own a torch, probably someone you know does, and a bit of propane is not to expensive.
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

Offline lenape13

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2009, 01:43:23 PM »
I'm using mostly used equipment myself, except for the couple of boxes I made myself.  I cleaned and sterilized them, gave them a fresh painting and away I went.  I did go with all new frames and foundation, though, and would suggest that.  For all they cost, it simply isn't worth the hassle of trying to clean them up.  The girls don't seem to mind the used equipment.  They're just busy doing their thing.

Offline bee-nuts

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2009, 03:52:57 PM »
I would have to try and use em myself.  I would try to find out who used em and why they were there.  Any responsible beek would have burned or buried them if they had AFB.  Although I guess it is possible for the person to now know they had it.  But remember, if your using only the boxes, if they don't give em to you it ain't worth it.

Anyway, the main reason I put in my one cent worth is to see if this is the type of torch used when torching.  This is a dual and very cheap.  I have a single and would like to make sure it is hot enough to do the job if I run into old boxes.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_403738_403738

This is a dual but may just make the job even easier than a single.  It is very cheap though. so Im not so sure about the quality.  But maybe for as often as a beek would use it, it would be more than adequate.
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Offline Sparky

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2009, 11:09:20 PM »
By god that torch should kill something!!!, bee-nuts. I used a turbo acetylene torch when doing some used boxes and it made quick work of them. Not everyone has a plumbers torch at their house though. The propane or map gas, hand torch should work fine and might be a bit easier to manage. If you like the idea of the long torch like the one in Northern I think the single would be easy to manage.

Offline kathyp

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2009, 11:18:42 PM »
scorch, not incinerate!   :evil:
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

Offline asprince

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2009, 11:42:36 PM »
I too just bought a large quantity of used equipment that has been in storage for many years. I have decided to take a chance. The benefits outweigh the risks. After reading this, I may scorch.

Steve   
Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan

Offline bee-nuts

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Re: Using old hives?
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2009, 11:53:20 PM »
LOL!!!  You both are letting your imagination get the best of you.



I can not imagine using anything else, but if the person doing the job really likes to pay attention to DETAIL and I mean really pay attention than use a hand torch by all means.  If you "may be able to obtain a large quantity of supers" I believe this is the tool for the job.  The only other piece of equipment you need is a propane tank (the same one you use for your grill) and your in business.  If anyone goes from a hand torch to this because of this thread they will thank me.  Most any commercial roofing supplier carries these but not as cheap as the one posted above.  They are simple to use and have a lever you squeeze on the handle to get the effect on video plus there should be a hand nob adjustment to tune it to your satisfaction and turn of gas to torch in addition to the one on your tank.  When lever is released the flame is equivalent to a napkin on fire or less.  You then lay it down with torch up.  There should be a thing on the torch that holds it of of the surface you rest it on similar to a uncapping knife rest but should be attached to the torch.  I cant see one in the pic.  No wonder it is so cheap.  I would not buy this unit.  I think you  should be able to find a decent single for about $70 bucks.  Probably much more detail than any of you care to know, but I'm telling you this is the tool unless you need a really hot flame to kill the spores.
The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson