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Author Topic: pollutants are not natural!  (Read 4855 times)
BjornBee
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« Reply #20 on: September 30, 2009, 11:57:45 AM »

I don't think one needs to live in mud huts and give up their computor to discuss such matters.

Your are correct though, I was amused.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #21 on: September 30, 2009, 12:10:22 PM »

Scads,
Sure, I can agree that apistan saved many hives. But we have come a long way since then. We know the dangers in learning from the past.

But did you know, that strips are still being marketed? So did we really learn anything? Without discussions such as this, maybe we never will.

It is not about whether apistan saved hives in the past, it is about discussing the impacts going forward. And history does get repeated over and over again. Will we have beekeepers with piles of contaminated combs piled ten feet high as we did in the past? Hard to say. But knowing that time and time again, that we find out later that treatments marketed as safe, will be found to be very questionable later.

It is about discussing possibilities, looking for solutions and options perhaps less damaging, and not being sucked into the next "fad" treatment out there. Not suggesting that because I type on a plastic keyboard, or use nails in my hives, that any discussions about trying to be "more" natural is a lost cause.

I think your taking a discussion that needs to be discussed, and demeaning others who are trying to do a better job than what we have done in the past. And I think your stretching peoples intentions by bringing in antibiotics and other items to make a point.

Yes, new items come and go. But that does no mean we should not scrutinize, question, and weigh the impacts. You do that by open discussions. And that means you should have your say also. But this is now becoming a pattern for you, in that you would rather just denigrate others, and I somehow get the idea you are against any such discussions of one trying to chemical free, or anything else, that you may be apposed too. Sorry if this amuses you.

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luvin honey
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« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2009, 02:08:25 PM »

One quick point:

Bemused: Muddled, stupefied.
Amused: Enjoyably occupied, interested.

Obviously there is more than one way to approach beekeeping. Those in favor of using commercial products, or at least feeling the need to, obviously see the pros of their methods. Those using no commercial products see theirs.

I am married to a conventional farmer. I am an organic one. As much as I defend and believe in my methods, it is NOT helpful to turn a deaf ear to my husband explaining his. We are all part of larger systems than our own personal lives and have reasons for/against everything we do.

I find it helpful to ask people why they do what they do rather than criticize it. More open dialogue seems to happen that way.

As for the bees, I'm only at the end of season one. Two hives appear to be failing. My third made from a split is booming. I have used nothing in the hives but vinegar-water twice when working them. I look forward to many years of beekeeping, learning all I can along the way about bees, their environment, their problems and strengths and all I can do (or NOT do) to help them thrive. It looks like it is going to be a continual learning process.

I suspect it comes down to genetics anyway. I personally plan to let genetics determine who lives and who dies. If they can't make it without me propping them up, I guess they will die. Those who thrive in this environment will pass on the genetics that make them perfect for this place and time.
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The pedigree of honey
Does not concern the bee;
A clover, any time, to him
Is aristocracy.
---Emily Dickinson
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