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Author Topic: Tiny spiders?  (Read 2428 times)
Creamhorses
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« on: August 27, 2009, 06:19:48 PM »

I have replaced my standard hive bottoms with the screened bottoms [2].  What arre the little light colored spider looking critters that go scurring around on the slide out panel?

TIA

Dave
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2009, 06:25:25 PM »

http://www.cornwallhoney.co.uk/beepedia/beevital.htm

do they look like this?

or this (bottom)

http://www.mdinvasivesp.org/archived_invaders/archived_invaders_2007_02.html
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fermentedhiker
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« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2009, 06:29:06 PM »

Hard to say without a more detailed description.  There are countless insects that live in and around the hive most of which aren't a problem.  Try and get some good pics of them and maybe we can identify them for you.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2009, 10:03:08 PM »

Grease the tray(slide) with Vaseline or spray with pam and catch a few. Leave in place about 24 hrs. Possibly could be mites
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Creamhorses
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« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2009, 11:26:10 PM »

Thank you all for your responses.  These litttle bugs are not varrao mites.  I found one of those earlier this summer on a larvae, and know what they look like. I put these screens in to catch these mites, but I've yet to see one when I pull these out once a week or so.

I'll give a few days for the population of whatever these are to show and get a pic.  They are very small, smaller than the red mite that looks like a frisbee.

Although I'm seeing some chalk brood, I was somewhat encouraged to see frames heavily covered with capped brood, and capped honey in the third hive body.  One hive is doing better than the other, though it seems they have see/sawed back and forth from one another in strength since we brought them home as new colonies ~ June 10.  I just added another 10 lbs/per of sugar water to both hives this past Monday.  They are working that as well as landing with white pollen? on their legs.   

We'd be so happy to make spring with both of these hives. 

I'll report back soon.  Dave

D

Tanks

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Creamhorses
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2009, 07:18:27 AM »

Well in an attempt to get a pic of these little critters, I ended up with a welt on my forehead....and one less bee in the house.  I did find 6 + bees on the tray, which shouldn't be. 

I also found a mite, the red frisbee looking one, like the pics show.  That is the only one I've seen on a tray.  This red mite is twice the size of these little spider looking things that I've mentioned.  I really wasn't much in the mood to shoot pics after the pinning. 

I did talk to a friend that claimed these tinys are not mites, because mites are red.....these are opaque [sp], and soft enough to crush without much effort. I'm trying to figure out if they have 6 or 8 legs.  They move like insects, and appear to have antenna. 

 


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BoBn
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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2009, 09:04:43 AM »

I also see little whitish spiders.  They are much smaller and faster moving than the varroa mites. Once in a while I see book lice too.
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fermentedhiker
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« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2009, 10:27:15 PM »


I did talk to a friend that claimed these tinys are not mites, because mites are red.....these are opaque [sp], and soft enough to crush without much effort. I'm trying to figure out if they have 6 or 8 legs.  They move like insects, and appear to have antenna. 


Not all mites are red.  There are several species of beneficial mites found within the beehive.  Also countless other critters live off of the waste that drops from the hive through the screened bottom as well as predatory ones that feed on the others.
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Creamhorses
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« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2009, 06:50:41 AM »

There must be a pic or two of a variety of these squatters.......
I'm gonna start a list. 
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VTnewbee
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« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2009, 09:21:11 AM »

I'm pretty sure I saw the exact same little buggers you're describing when I pulled out my inspection tray yesterday and I'm also in Vermont.  It seems that whatever they are, several of us New Englanders are experiencing it.  huh  I have no idea whether they're something to worry about or not.
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BoBn
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2009, 07:12:09 PM »

They have 2 body segments and 8 legs. 
I can't get a good picture.
Need a low power microscope to get a good image:
http://img42.imageshack.us/img42/2382/littlespider.jpg
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"Millions of innocent men, women, and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined, and imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch toward uniformity. What has been the effect of coercion? To make one-half the world fools and the other half hypocrites."
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fermentedhiker
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« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2009, 08:46:46 PM »

Look anything like this?

http://www.michaelandjudystouffer.com/judy/blog/images/pseudoscorpion.jpg
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Creamhorses
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« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2009, 08:59:24 PM »

No....these don't have claws, are off-white incolor and have simetrical digits.  That little devil have a name?



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fermentedhiker
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« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2009, 09:02:06 PM »

it's a pseudoscorpion, they're actually a beneficial bug to have around.  They prey on other smaller pests like dust mites etc....
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VTnewbee
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« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2009, 01:46:54 PM »

I know this is an old topic but a thought just crossed my mind and now I'm wondering.  I also saw these "tiny spiders" the original poster mentioned (and everyone that claimed to be seeing them at the time seemed to be mostly from New England) and now I suddenly have a varroa problem.  Of course, this has me wondering if these tiny spiders were possibly varroa larvae, or varroa in some non-adult stage?  Anyone know what a varroa would look like before it reaches adulthood?  Or is anyone else who saw these tiny spiders a month ago now having a varroa problem?  It would be nice to know if that's what I was seeing so I could be more proactive next time.
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Creamhorses
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« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2009, 07:20:09 PM »

I just did a fall house cleaning....the screened bottom panels were free of anything except some pollen, poop, and a few frightened ants. No mites.....no critters.

I'm not sure how those little spiders could have been a 'larva' stage, having limbs, and a mature type of physical appearence.  They are still a mystery............I saw nothing to indicate they were a detriment to the hives.

VTnewbee.....we can't possibly bee the only beeks with those little critters.  Do you have a lot of mites? 

Dave

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VTnewbee
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« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2009, 07:06:58 AM »

I'm kind of surprised that no one else was seeing them either!  They are tiny though, and such a light color that I suppose if my eyes were even the slightest bit weaker I'd probably never have seen them.  I just started doing 24 hour mite counts yesterday and yesterday I had 40-50 in the pull out tray under the screened bottom board.  All summer I was checking it on a weekly basis and would only see 5 a week at the most.  I'm so disappointed!  They even went through a brood break a month or so ago so I really thought I was going to be in good shape.  rolleyes Of course, because of that I didn't medicate so now I need to figure out what to do.
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fcderosa
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« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2009, 09:59:26 PM »

I yanked up one of my screened bottom boards and found it infested with Black Widows.  Several were the size of a Quarter.  Now I wear gloves a whole lot more.
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Creamhorses
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« Reply #18 on: October 09, 2009, 04:31:48 AM »

Woah....I'm thinking I'd freak with such a discovery........spiders are generallt ok with me.....I let them live, even in the house.  But aren't these dark Vador types extremly dangerous?  And what did you do with them?
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LAC
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« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2009, 06:10:28 AM »

It could possible be male varroa.
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