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Author Topic: Is it normal for...  (Read 1649 times)
bee-nuts
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« on: September 02, 2009, 12:55:10 AM »

I split a hive in three.  The hive consisted of three deep boxes.  I took one away with a queen cell on July third and did not have new brood till early august.  I took another box July 11th and introduced a mated queen on the twelfth of July.  About three weeks ago both were doing great, had nice brood patterns, enough pollen, and were packing away the honey to my satisfaction.  I added another super to these about three weeks ago.  I left them alone until today.  They both have more bees than before but almost no honey and have done little or nothing with foundation in new supers.  Maybe a frame of honey left total in each hive give or take.  They had lots and lots of brood but all the honey on top of brood frames was completely consumed on most frames containing brood. 

I'm thinking that maybe they are lacking enough field bees at the moment to keep up with brood rearing.  The box that was left from original hove with original queen had two deeps, and one medium.  they have drawn all foundation out and have either honey or brood in all of it now and are already  capping honey in the top medium.  I added another medium to this one because they have been building swarm cells and are already over crowded.  these are all in different locations.  The one just mentioned has blooming alfalfa.  The other two have different forage.  One field thistle and one goldenrod.  There are of course other forage but these are the main ones of significance that I notice.

Of course the original colony had no brood interruption like the others but frames of brood were in each when made.  I just find it hard to believe that they would raise so much brood and continue too, even though they are almost out of stores.  I am making sugar water as I type this.  I'm not panacing just curious if this is normal.  I was told to feed them, but I have to find stuff out for myself.  I don't like doing things just cause someone says so, I want to understand why or debunk.  Neither were aggressive either.  Very nice.

Anyway, I will start feeding the girls tomorrow.  Any info, knowledge, or similes appreciated.

Of course I thank all for there responses.
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RayMarler
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2009, 03:26:27 AM »

OK, so here's the deal. I make up a nuc or split. It takes 21 to 28 days to get a laying queen. By that time, all the adult bees there when the nuc was made is dead. The brood present when the split was made is now the only field force when the new queen starts laying. These bees will be dead by the time the new queens first brood starts emerging. They will be the nurse bee force now for the queen to lay more, and by this time the field force is reduced quite a lot, but from now on over all population will start increasing. It takes about 3 brood cycles (63 days) to get the hive population stablized and growing, from what I've seen here.

You're hive with the original queen was actively laying so no brood production down-time, and she had all the field force to keep bringing in stores. At the time you made the splits, she was full of field force with a greatly reduced brood population to need feeding, since brood frames went with the splits. So this hive has field force, less brood, nectar flow, so it is able to store up lots more honey than the other splits, which kept losing population for the first 60 days or so.
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scdw43
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2009, 02:17:45 PM »

I agree with the above. Add a frame of capped brood, no bees every two weeks until they get their numbers up.
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bee-nuts
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2009, 05:48:17 PM »

I kinda figured lack of field bees must be the cause but I still find it hard to believe that they still are raising more brood with so little supplies.  Adding some capped brood is not the  answer because there is plenty of it hatching now..  Anyhow I filmed the adventure but was very lazy and now I know why because me and my daughter are sick today.  I made five gallons of two to one syrup but they will have to wait till I feel better.
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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2009, 05:58:45 PM »

my  hives did some massive brood rearing this year and used stores as fast as they brought them in.  it was kind of a strange year here.  should have been a good honey year and wasn't.  hives should have been bigger and were not.  no disease.  minimal mite infestation.  go figure.
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RayMarler
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2009, 07:33:16 PM »

I kinda figured lack of field bees must be the cause but I still find it hard to believe that they still are raising more brood with so little supplies. 

They were raising brood because they were fresh mated queens. Good fresh mated queens will take off like a shot, laying more brood (sometimes) than she has bees or feed to take care of it. Put on feeders when you feel better, sorry to hear your not up to spit. Try a teaspoon of honey a day, will keep the doctor away, especially if you have an apple with it!
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