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Author Topic: How much honey in a Qt. canning jar?  (Read 15257 times)
jdesq
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« on: August 19, 2009, 06:04:33 PM »

I do not have a scale and would like to know how much honey to fill a quart and  pint canning jars?  Lbs. and oz's would be great. Thanks!!
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asprince
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« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2009, 06:15:40 PM »

One quart honey = three pounds.

Steve

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« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2009, 06:35:21 PM »

thanks steve!  any idea on pint jars?
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BjornBee
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« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2009, 06:45:08 PM »

quart...44 oz.
pint.....22 oz.
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« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2009, 06:54:50 PM »

Man you guys got big pints, my pints way a lb. remember the saying ,, a pints a pound the world around.
16 US ounces of honey weigh 1.36 pounds (or 0.615 kilogramm) and for good measure, lets say a deviation of + or - 5gm. specific to the water content.



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« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2009, 07:20:51 PM »

http://www.traditionaloven.com/conversions_of_measures/honey_measurements.html
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« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2009, 11:51:57 PM »

A pints a pound never made sense to me. a pint of lead would weigh more than a pint of water...

Great conversion calculator,
 thanks,
Alfred
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« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2009, 07:15:26 AM »

so  a lb of feathers weighs less than a lb of lead ?
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« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2009, 08:11:02 AM »

so  a lb of feathers weighs less than a lb of lead ?

No, but the volume would be very different and a pint of feathers would weigh considerably less than a pint of lead.

A volume of honey (in volume ounces) weighs about 50 percent more (in weight ounces).
1 pint = 16 volume ounces.
1 pint of honey weighs 1 1/2 pounds (24 weight ounces)
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« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2009, 08:13:03 AM »

If you need this info. to be put on jars of honey for sale;
Better check the Wisconsin & Federal laws,{ Federal wt. law does apply to honey } more to it than lbs. & ozs.

And when you say you have a lb. it better be a lb. or a tad more !

Bee-Bop
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« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2009, 01:09:42 PM »

Ah yes....were getting there.

Surprised nobody asked me why I had 22 and 44 oz in a pint and quart jar.

Honey is measured in net weight. Fluid oz. has nothing to do with it. Your selling pounds or weight.

So to answer the question "How many pounds are in a quart" is a trick question of sorts. Quart is a measure of volume for most things. But if your talking weight, that can vary by a wide amount as already mentioned. A filled quart of water is of a different weight than a quart of filled lead.

So here is what I did. I took a quart jar. Put it on the scale. zeroed it. Then added honey to the level that looked good and it read 44 oz by weight. Keep in mind not all quart jars are the same.  So although I'm selling honey in quart jars, my label states you are getting exactly what you are paying for.....44 oz of honey by WEIGHT....and is clearly stated on the label!

I did the same for the pint and " Net wt. 22 oz." is what is on the label.

All labels I have even seen in the honey industry are marked as "net wt." and not "fluid oz."

Hope this helps.
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« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2009, 02:12:51 PM »

Bjorn;

Don't the Federal law require weight in both  pound/onces & grams for honey ?
Seems as if I read that some were, guess I need to look it up !

I have been wrong before.
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« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2009, 02:19:44 PM »

At our local farmers market I've seen it in plain quart jars with no label, and just a sign that says "Honey -$8"  I don't know if it's legal or not, but the honey police didn't seem to be making a big deal about it.

Of course I live in the sticks.
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« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2009, 02:44:34 PM »

David;
Tennessee Honey Law;

Read second sentence, second paragraph then go to item #14

http://cpa.utk.edu/pdffiles/cpa162.pdf

The " honey police " as you say, may not come around, but don't bet your bippy !
Ignorance of the Law ----------- ?

A lot of people that are turned in who have bottled products, are reported to the Co. Health Dept. by their competitors at farmers mkts, craft fairs etc.

Oh, my biggest close by City is around 2500
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« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2009, 03:26:37 PM »

David;
Tennessee Honey Law;

Read second sentence, second paragraph then go to item #14

http://cpa.utk.edu/pdffiles/cpa162.pdf

The " honey police " as you say, may not come around, but don't bet your bippy !
Ignorance of the Law ----------- ?

a lot of people that are turned in who have bottled products, are reported to the Co. Health Dept. by their competitors at farmers mkts, craft fairs etc.

Oh, my biggest close by City is around 2500


It wasn't me.  I'm still wishing my bees would just make enough to feed their selves.

Personally I think that it should be properly labeled.  I don't see what difference it makes whether it's labeled by weight, volume or mouthfulls though other than the law says so.  I guess to make sure that the packaging isn't misleading. 
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« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2009, 04:30:26 PM »

I seriously doubt the Feds care about whether honey is sold by weight or volume.  Please post an actual law.  Barring that, it's state law that matters.  i sell by volume, period.  Here is the Texas law for honey sales:

SUBCHAPTER E. LABELING AND SALE OF HONEY



Sec. 131.081.  USE OF "HONEY" ON LABEL.  A person may not label, sell, or keep, offer, or expose for sale a product identified on its label as "honey," "liquid or extracted honey," "strained honey," or "pure honey" unless the product consists exclusively of pure honey.



Amended by Acts 1983, 68th Leg., p. 1884, ch. 350, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1983.





Sec. 131.082.  USE OF BEE, HIVE, OR COMB DESIGN.  A person may not label, sell, or keep, expose, or offer for sale a product that resembles honey and that has on its label a picture or drawing of a bee, hive, or comb unless the product consists exclusively of pure honey.



Amended by Acts 1983, 68th Leg., p. 1884, ch. 350, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1983.





Sec. 131.083.  SALE OF IMITATION HONEY.  A person may not label, sell, or keep, expose, or offer for sale a product that resembles honey and is identified on its label as "imitation honey."



Amended by Acts 1983, 68th Leg., p. 1884, ch. 350, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1983.





Sec. 131.084.  SALE OF HONEY MIXTURES.  (a)  A person may not label, sell, or keep, expose, or offer for sale a product that consists of honey mixed with another ingredient unless:

(1)  the product bears a label with a list of ingredients; and

(2)  "honey" appears in the list of ingredients in the same size type of print as the other ingredients.

(b)  A person may not label, sell, or keep, expose, or offer for sale a product that contains honey mixed with another ingredient and contains in the product name "honey" in a larger size of type or print or in a more prominent position than the other words in the product name.



Amended by Acts 1983, 68th Leg., p. 1884, ch. 350, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1983.
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« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2009, 04:46:32 PM »

 stay on topic

What a waste..... Wink
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« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2009, 12:31:33 AM »

the way I understand it ,, a gal of honey is considered 12 pounds ,,,  but if your  selling it ,,  the legal way is have a scale ,

''' Surprised nobody asked me why I had 22 and 44 oz in a pint and quart jar."""

12 pounds to a gal =   192  oz        12 pounds  x 16 oz  =192 oz
4 qt in a gal     
  192 oz / 4 =  48 oz  of honey to the qt
2 pints to qt
  48 oz / 2 = 24 oz to a pint

but if you use the scale ( and subtract the weight of the jar )  even if you put 20 oz in a pint jar and put 20 oz on the label it is a legal label ..  like is said before ,  specific to the water content. a deviation of + or - will be there ..  so I would invest in a good scale ...   you don't want to get caught short .

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« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2009, 08:08:22 AM »

This has always confused me...I thought a gallon of honey was around 12 lbs.

But a quart only holds 44 oz, that is 11lbs per gallon.

So which is it? huh
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« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2009, 09:12:19 AM »

The following is a quote from the preamble for a volume to weight conversion chart.
I think it explains things a little better.

"In most case, food measured by volume, such as teaspoons, cups, pints, etc., does not weigh the number of ounces that would be contained in that measure if given in fluid ounces.  A fluid ounce is a measure based on the amount of space filled by one ounce of water.  Obviously, you cannot assume other substances have the same density as water, and will, therefore, weigh the same as water.

If you fill a measuring cup with honey, it will not weigh eight ounces -- because it is denser then water it will weigh 12 ounces.  If something other than water is being measured by volume, do not make the mistake of assuming that the 16 ounces in a pint equals the same 16 ounces in a pound.  To be certain, you must weigh the measured volume of the ingredient you want to use."
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« Reply #20 on: August 28, 2009, 12:43:46 PM »

Well I took the easy way out. I bought jars that stated one poiund jars. I filled them weighted them and they weighed 1.lb and 1.4 grams. works for me. one jar one lb.
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« Reply #21 on: August 28, 2009, 06:42:23 PM »

Of course if you're talking physics you have to take M (mass) x G (force of gravity) = N (newtons).
 This simple equation can help you figure out how much to sell your honey for on different planets! grin
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« Reply #22 on: August 28, 2009, 08:58:34 PM »

This has always confused me...I thought a gallon of honey was around 12 lbs.

But a quart only holds 44 oz, that is 11lbs per gallon.

So which is it? huh

He's saying that he only puts 44 oz in his quart jars because that is where he likes to fill them to.  I've got pint squeeze bottles that hold enough honey to weigh in at about 27oz.  It's all just a matter of getting everything labeled right for what you have in there.
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« Reply #23 on: August 29, 2009, 09:40:56 AM »

Selling honey by weight must date back to all comb honey times.  Bottled honey is liquid.  Sell it by volume like everything else.
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« Reply #24 on: August 29, 2009, 10:56:02 AM »

Selling honey by weight must date back to all comb honey times.  Bottled honey is liquid.  Sell it by volume like everything else.

What are you talking about?

I just went through my fridge. Welch's jelly......Net WEIGHT.  Smuckers....Net Wt.  Squeeze basil....Net Wt.  Ritter Marzipan.....Net Wt.  Grey Poupon.....Net Wt.  Mustard, ice cream syrup, sour cream, pickles, cat food, and so on. All sold by weight. Many things more liquid than honey are sold by weight. So it is not "everything". Seems like there is no real reasoning from one item to another.

I stopped looking after about 20 items for anything that did not sell by NET WT! Items sold by Fluid amounts are juices and milk, and probably newer products on the market that have since fallen into some category of fluid measuring. Yes many liquids are sold by fluid amounts. But honey has been measured out for many years in pounds and they have kept that tradition.  

Try to find a label for honey that is not with "Net wt."

I think you are way off on this. Traditionally honey has always sold by weight. one pound jar, two pound jar and so on. There are many items such as hot sauce, salad dressing, and many liquid items sold as fluid measure. But those are not the long standing traditional items, such as with honey.

I'll dig through the paperwork when I got certified with my honey house. At that time, I went through the "weights and measure" department for labeling requirements. I'm almost certain that the variation of what was in the bottle had to be within a certain tolerance of what the label indicated, and that tolerance was measured in weight. If you say there is a pound of honey in the bottle, it better be real close, and even going "over" was a violation. You must sell exactly what you claim to be selling.

Why anyone would not want to sell honey as the consumer has come to expect and know, is a mystery to me. I can talk clearly to anyone about how much honey is in a two pound jar of honey. (two pounds!) But start mentioning 32 oz.....and far less will get it.

I guess you can always mark a jar and "guess" if you fill it "about" this much for fluid measuring, MAYBE you will have the right amount.  rolleyes Most beekeepers don't have fancy calibrated liquid bottling machines that can dispence exactly 44 FLUID oz.  But traditionally, a beekeeper have always been able to put a jar on a scale, and measure out 1 pound.

Some jars are a little different from one company to the next. a real problem needing to find out where 44 fl. oz and how full it needs to be. But weighing it,....no problem.  Wink Pull out a scale and you know with every type jar.

For anyone just getting into bottling honey, do yourself a favor. Measure by pounds. Your customers have come to expect this, and it is far easier for you.

I have a good collection of different style pint and quart jars. And the differences in the amounts each holds is incredible. I think some hold far more than what you think, while others are far less. I've seen some pint and quart jars (with handles sometimes) used in the restaurant business for serving drinks, and they are very misleading. I've also ordered "pint" style jars from different manufacturers and what they are selling is a jar or bottle, and certainly nothing that is made to hold an exact amount of anything.

Sell by pounds...... grin
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« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2009, 05:11:38 PM »

Really, I buy my ice cream by the gallon.  I never have even looked at the weight of jelly, but I buy it by the jar, not the weight.  Think about it.  Do you really compare the price of these things by weight, or are you just siting the fact they have weights?  a quart of of honey is a quart of honey, just like a gallon of ice cream is a gallon of ice cream.  I suspect the idea came from the days when random jars and buckets were used and it was easier to weigh it than measure it.  It still is easier to weigh on an assembly or bottling line, but I sell a hand packaged commodity, not a processed and automated.  There is no law that says you can't sell by volume, at least here, so that's what I elect to do.  If I sell by weight, I have to weigh them, at least for every batch.  Not happening here.  And by the way, pints and quarts have legal definitions.  Don't believe it, ask a Brit.  I can measure it with a measuring cup and be right on, and my mark on the jar won't vary with the density of the honey.  Your weight will.

(Abbr. pt. or p.)
a unit of volume or capacity in the U.S. Customary System, used in liquid measure, equal to 1/8 gallon or 16 ounces (0.473 liter).
a unit of volume or capacity in the U.S. Customary System, used in dry measure, equal to 1/16 peck or 1/2 quart (0.551 liter).
a unit of volume or capacity in the British Imperial System, used in dry and liquid measure, equal to 0.568 liter.

a container with a pint capacity.
The amount of a substance that can be held in such a container.
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« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2009, 05:35:07 PM »

Ross,
Geeez! I could not even get through the first sentence without being confused.  huh

Why the comment about ice cream? I never mentioned ice cream. Of course it's sold in half gallon and gallon, as well as quart and pint. Your point???

And no, it's the other way around...2 pounds of honey is two pounds of honey. I bet most who think they have a true pint or a quart, are way off. Who is going to measure out a fluid liquid amount and mark the jar, etc. Just getting it out of the measuring cups throws off any true measure. I bet your average guy couldn't even use a measuring cup correctly... Wink

I bet most grab a pint looking jar or a quart looking jar, and simply have co clue as to what it really holds. They just fill it up and slap a label on.

On the other hand, weighing the amount, leave NO doubt.

Original question was "How much honey in a quart jar. Answer... depend how much you put in it. Easiest way to know....weigh it.  Wink
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« Reply #27 on: August 29, 2009, 05:39:34 PM »


(Abbr. pt. or p.)
a unit of volume or capacity in the U.S. Customary System, used in liquid measure, equal to 1/8 gallon or 16 ounces (0.473 liter).
a unit of volume or capacity in the U.S. Customary System, used in dry measure, equal to 1/16 peck or 1/2 quart (0.551 liter).
a unit of volume or capacity in the British Imperial System, used in dry and liquid measure, equal to 0.568 liter.

a container with a pint capacity.
The amount of a substance that can be held in such a container.


Yeah.....I see many beekeeper measuring out and dividing 1/8 of a gallon. Or 0.473 liters...... lau

How about explaining how the average person does that, assuming you actually need to know what goes in the bottle....  Wink

My way....weigh it. Really simple.

There you go jdesq.....measure out 1/8 of a gallon, for a pint, and add pints together till you get to a quart..... grin
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« Reply #28 on: August 29, 2009, 06:13:48 PM »

a pint jar holds a pint guys.  Measure a pint of water, mark a jar, done.  Just the same as weighing a pound of honey and marking a jar so you know how much to fill it.  Or are you going to tell me you really weigh every bottle?  Didn't think so.  Difference is, every one of mine will be a pint.  Yours will vary with the type of honey, how dry it is, whether it's filtered or not, how humid the weather is, etc.  The bottom line is, my customers are just as happy buying pints and quarts as your's are buying pounds and ounces.  It doesn't matter one wit which you do.  It's not a religion and it's not a law.  Just as long as you say what you did, it's fine.
Bjorn, when was the last time you went to the store for 3.34 ounces of Grey Poupon?  Would you have declined if it had been 5 fluid ounces?
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« Reply #29 on: August 29, 2009, 06:54:15 PM »

weigh every bottle.... lau  Come on Ross, get a grip.

What I'm suggesting is what you said. As long as you label what is in the bottle, no complaints here.

I'm just suggesting to new beekeepers who read here....

1)Honey has traditionally been sold in pounds. Pick up the ABJ or any other thing that reports honey sales...and it's always has been in pounds. 1 pounds jars, 2 pound jars, etc. With the exception of gallon jugs.

2) All labels sold in the bee mags and from bee supply companies have "net wt." Of course you can custom order your labels. But I'm just suggesting that it is much easier to stick with what the industry has always used and is in easy supply.

With that said, I see no reason to confuse or continue confusing every new beekeeper who gets started.

And I'll still say, that those pints and quart jars come in a variety of sizes. I have supposedly pint and quart jars that vary very much.

Maybe some government loving beekeeper can now ask the politicians since we now have a standard of what honey "is" that goes in the bottle, to now set a standard to how much goes in.... rolleyes

BTW....from past discussions from most who take pride in selling honey from pints and quarts, mainly in the south, they way under charge for their honey... Wink

My advice....Stick with 1 pound, 2 pound and perhaps bears which are big sellers. You'll be selling what MOST of the public knows, have labels marked with "new wt", and probably sell for a better price.  Wink
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« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2009, 10:49:29 AM »

a pint jar holds a pint guys.  Measure a pint of water, mark a jar, done.  Just the same as weighing a pound of honey and marking a jar so you know how much to fill it.  Or are you going to tell me you really weigh every bottle?  Didn't think so.  Difference is, every one of mine will be a pint.  Yours will vary with the type of honey, how dry it is, whether it's filtered or not, how humid the weather is, etc.  The bottom line is, my customers are just as happy buying pints and quarts as your's are buying pounds and ounces.  It doesn't matter one wit which you do.  It's not a religion and it's not a law.  Just as long as you say what you did, it's fine.
Bjorn, when was the last time you went to the store for 3.34 ounces of Grey Poupon?  Would you have declined if it had been 5 fluid ounces?

You're right.... most pint jars will hold a at least a pint, but many will hold much more.  I bought pint queeze bottles and they hold better than 2 1/4 cups of honey.  Surely they will hold a pint, but they will also hold however much will fit under the lid.  I can bet that is never exactly what you are thinking it is.

Also, if you are wanting to get technical with volume then your customers are getting more honey on a day that it is out in the sun and has gotten warm then on a day that you have pulled it out of storage and is cool, or the jar that has already crystallized.  Honey will change volume by temperature, but the weight won't change.
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Bee-Bop
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« Reply #31 on: August 30, 2009, 11:21:37 AM »

Isn't this,
           beat a dead horse  over & over     beat a dead horse

Bee-Bop
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the kid
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« Reply #32 on: August 30, 2009, 02:46:11 PM »

IMO ,, you sell how they are use to ,,,   
a pound of butter is 2 cups ,   when was the last time you wrote on the list to buy 10
 cups of butter Huh
you say you buy a jar of jelly ,, you do not know if it is sold by the pound or pint  ?? 
 
but when you sell by the pound you have to by law weigh the container ,,  and then
 add your pound of honey ,for a total  ..
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rdy-b
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« Reply #33 on: August 30, 2009, 07:27:39 PM »

Isn't this,
           beat a dead horse  over & over     beat a dead horse

Bee-Bop
                     What about honey stixs how much do they weigh  grin  cheesy  cool  Wink RDY-B
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BjornBee
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« Reply #34 on: August 30, 2009, 08:14:58 PM »

 banana devil banana devil piano yippie chick beat a dead horse yippie chick banana devil banana devil locked

Hey....It's a dead horse party!

And as soon as it's tender enough, were eating good grub!
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trapperbob
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« Reply #35 on: August 31, 2009, 07:51:26 PM »

I weigh every jar 3lbs for quarts and 24 0z for pints then add a little more for good measure some people think that I am cheating myself but my customers keep coming back so i'm happy.
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beecanbee
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« Reply #36 on: August 31, 2009, 08:14:29 PM »

A bit off topic - and I do of course get the lesson from this thread... but I just wanted to say that I am intrigued by what you folks have in your refrigerators.  Smiley
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“I come from a state that raises corn and cotton and cockleburs and Democrats, and frothy eloquence neither convinces nor satisfies me. I am from Missouri. You have got to show me."  Duncan Vandiver

A boy can do half the work of a man, but two boys do less, and three boys get nothing done at all. Smiley

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« Reply #37 on: September 01, 2009, 11:08:20 PM »

In Mo. you must have a lable with your name and address and net wt. I can only get 46 oz. in a qt (golden harvest, brand) i can get 24 oz. in a pint (golden harvest). I also sell 12 oz. and 24 oz. bears, clam shell boxes of comb honey 8 oz. and 16 oz. We have to tare weigh our containers before we fill them. You have to have an approved kitchen ( inspected by the health dept.) and the state sends the weight and measure inspectors around to check your scales ( and charge you $5.00 for checking it). Yes we weigh every container, these laws applies if you sell at farmers markets or wholesale it to a buisness. If you just sell from your home or farm you still have to label it with your name and address and net wt. I sell at the Fair Grove, Mo. Farms Market and from my home, sometimes i wonder if it's worth it. huh Jack
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the kid
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« Reply #38 on: September 02, 2009, 12:33:08 AM »

a bit off topic - and I do of course get the lesson from this thread... but I just wanted to say that I am intrigued by what you folks have in your refrigerators.  Smiley

I think I know what you mean ,,,  was in Germany ` 1 1/2 years most there ,, at that time food shopped all most every day ,, in the U.S. some shop once every 4 to 6 weeks .. You would not want to see my fredge.. 
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Chick
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« Reply #39 on: September 06, 2009, 03:16:33 PM »

Man you guys got big pints, my pints way a lb. remember the saying ,, a pints a pound the world around.
16 US ounces of honey weigh 1.36 pounds (or 0.615 kilogramm) and for good measure, lets say a deviation of + or - 5gm. specific to the water content.

22 ozs = 1.37 pounds. So, how do you figure that he has big pints. He has exactly what you are saying. There is a difference between ounces of mass and ounces of fluid. That old saying, is just an old saying.


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kathyp
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« Reply #40 on: September 06, 2009, 03:43:31 PM »

Quote
In Mo. you must have a lable with your name and address and net wt. I can only get 46 oz. in a qt (golden harvest, brand) i can get 24 oz. in a pint (golden harvest). I also sell 12 oz. and 24 oz. bears, clam shell boxes of comb honey 8 oz. and 16 oz. We have to tare weigh our containers before we fill them. You have to have an approved kitchen ( inspected by the health dept.) and the state sends the weight and measure inspectors around to check your scales ( and charge you $5.00 for checking it). Yes we weigh every container, these laws applies if you sell at farmers markets or wholesale it to a buisness. If you just sell from your home or farm you still have to label it with your name and address and net wt. I sell at the Fair Grove, Mo. Farms Market and from my home, sometimes i wonder if it's worth it.  Jack

is this true even for farmers market stuff?  seems like it would make cottage type farmers sales pretty hard. those are usually excluded from retail food sale rules.  what about  fields that are u-pick, etc?  is honey different because it needs "processing"?
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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