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Author Topic: Small Hive Beatle?  (Read 3698 times)
harvey
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« on: August 12, 2009, 07:17:31 PM »

I have yet to see any bugs in the hive cept the bees.  I am sure there are mights but haven't seen any.  I am wondering what small hive beatles look like.  I have been seeing all kinds of beatles on the goldenrod.
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asprince
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« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2009, 07:30:26 PM »

Count your blessings! They look like small black lady bugs. They are about one third the size of lady bugs.


Steve
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Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
harvey
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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2009, 07:34:06 PM »

Cool!  The beetles I am seeing on the goldenrod are almost as big or bigger than the bees with green stripe on there back.
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Joelel
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2009, 10:29:33 PM »

Cool!  The beetles I am seeing on the goldenrod are almost as big or bigger than the bees with green stripe on there back.

I don't think you have them as far north as you are yet. They just came to this country about 3 or 5 yrs. ago I understand.They got off a boat a in Florida and are working their way around the states.Their little brown bugs about half the size of a lady bug.
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Acts2:37: Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles, Men and brethren, what shall we do?
38: Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.
39: For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call.
40: And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation
Beaver Dam
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« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2009, 09:47:49 PM »

I,ve got them bad. I've closed down the areas that the bees have to protect with follower boards and or taken them from 10 frame bodies to nucks. Any Ideas for a fix for the SHB?
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Coge
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« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2009, 11:04:09 PM »

Beaver Dam,
This is the first year that I have found them. That's why I found this site. I was looking for answers. I found a lot of information, but no sure cure. I ordered some Hood Traps from Brushy Mountain. They are catching some beetles. I hope it is enough.
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But for the grace of God it would be you instead of me.
SlickMick
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2009, 07:31:03 AM »

Guys,

You aren't going to find a magic bullet with these pests. Now you have them you are just going to have to learn to manage them.

One shb adult lays some hundreds of eggs hence you may not see the beetle in your hives but you will see the larva when they get into your honey supers and by then it is generally too late. If you are seeing them in quantity in your hives then you are on a short cut to problems.

In managing them the idea is to minimise the number of beetle in the hive and to eliminate places for them to lay.. pretty hard to do but necessary.

Reduce the entrance to the size that your guard bees can manage. My hives are presently working on entrances 3/8" high by 3"-6" long

One entrance only. If you are also using a top entrance for ventillation consider how you can screen it

Get flyscreen over any sbb's you have to prevent the beetle entering that way

Take off empty supers and freeze the frames. Replace supers only when necessary and then only frame by frame as they are needed

Make sure that bees cover every frame fully

Dont put stickeys back on the hive but allow the cleaning to be done away from the hive.

Dont leave pollen patties around or in the hive too long.. I understand that 3 days is too long.

Get traps in. Consider bottom board oil traps as these can also give you an indication if you have larva in your honey super/s

If you are getting larva in your bottom board oil trap you will have beetle laying in your hive and you need to act quickly to save your hive. 

Monitor regularly. Check the brood box to make sure that the shb is not getting into the bee larva.

If you can control the shb adult in the hive you will control the larva. The presence of larva in the BB oil trap is indicative of mature larva heading for the light at the entrance where they fall to the ground to pupate.

If you see large numbers of larva in your BB oil trap remove your supers hose the larva into a drum of water and detergent and then freeze the frames. Dont let the larva enter the soil but make sure you kill them.

Get your hives into full sun if possible

Hope that helps

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Joelel
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« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2009, 09:53:04 AM »

Small Hive Beetle (SHB)

The Threat of the SHB
The small hive beetle (aethina tumida) is very destructive to bee colonies, and can reduce an otherwise strong colony to a non-producer, or even destroy the colony entirely, in a matter of weeks.  In Florida, where the beetle was first discovered in 1998, the State Department of Agriculture has stated that the SHB is capable of wiping out an apiary "overnight".  While this is of course an exaggeration, this pest is a serious threat to any apiary. The SHB seems to easily be able to overcome even strong honeybee colonies, and the bees are not able to defend themselves adequately.  A very strong colony has a better chance for survival than a weak one, but even if a strong colony survives, you cannot expect any honey production, and any surplus honey will be spoiled. When infestations are strong, the honeybee queen will stop her egg-laying activity, and the entire colony may abscond.  Because SHB are strong fliers and migrate freely (with an estimated range of up to 5 miles per flight), if they are allowed to propagate, they can quickly dominate even a large apiary, and spread to other local apiaries.

Physical description
The adult SHB is about 3/16" to 1/4" long (approximately 1/3 the size of a honeybee) and is dark red, brown or black.  The beetle is covered with fine hair, which is especially noticeable on the legs.  It is also unmistakably identified by the "bulbs" on the end of the antennae, as shown here.  The larvae are small, cream colored grubs, with three sets of legs just behind the head.  SHB larvae lack the series of paired prolegs running the length of the body that are on wax moth larvae.  SHB larvae are noticeably smaller than the 3/4-inch wax moth larvae.  SHB larvae do not leave the trails of silken web as do the wax moth larvae -- they just leave a trail of slimy, putrid excrement.  SHB consume pollen, wax and honey -- basically, they will eat everything in the hive except wooden hardware and plastic foundation.  In addition, burrowing larvae kill the bee brood as they tunnel through the comb.

Detection
Each time you open and inspect the hive, you should keep a sharp lookout for this nasty critter.  SHB adults can be observed scurrying across the hive surfaces, looking for hiding places.  Adults can also be seen around the top cover and inside on the bottom board.  The scoundrel shown at the top of the page ran quickly from underneath the edge of the top cover down the hive box and into the entrance.  In an especially heavy SHB infestation, clumps of larvae and adults can be seen on both the frames and the bottom board, and you will also notice a decayed-orange smell.  This smell results from a large number of adults and larvae contaminating the honey stores with their feces, causing it to ferment.  If you are administering sugar syrup in a hive-top feeder, you will see various sizes of adult beetles in the feeder reservoir.  If you have pollen patties on the frames, you will see the larvae in the patties, as shown here.

A more proactive SHB detection method is to use a piece of corrugated cardboard, preferably the plastic variety, which the bees do not quickly chew up.  Remove the outer surface from one side, and place it on the bottom board, smooth side up, near the rear of the hive.  The adult SHB seem to use the cardboard as a shelter, and periodic inspection of the cardboard will reveal SHB if they are present.  You may attach a string to the cardboard, making it easy to extract periodically for inspection.  This method may allow you to detect SHB in your hives before their population reaches dangerous levels, which can happen in approximately 3-4 weeks from the time of their initial introduction into your hives.

Prevention
To take proactive measures, perform all of the following steps for the best chance of preventing an SHB infestation:

 Maintain strong, healthy colonies
Healthy, populous honeybee colonies can sometimes prevent infestation in their hive, since there are enough bees on the interior hive surfaces to defend against adult SHB that enter the colony.  However, maintaining a strong colony does not always prevent SHB infestation; it may just delay it.

 Do not leave hive or maintenance equipment in the apiary
The smell of the hive interior on hive tools, woodenware or other equipment in the apiary can attract flying SHB adults.  Always remove these from the apiary and store them when not in use.

 Never discard comb, waste honey or syrup near the apiary
SHB are especially attracted to the sweet smell of honey, honeycomb and sugar syrup.  Never discard any of this material in or near the apiary -- always take it back to the honey house and dispose of it properly.

 During the honey harvest, remove and extract honey immediately
If honey supers are ready to remove for the honey harvest, do not leave them sitting on the hive body, since SHB are strongly attracted to the smell of honey.  Remove the supers and extract the honey immediately.  Temporarily return the extracted supers to the hive so the bees can clean the comb.  After the comb has been cleaned, the supers should be removed and stored in the honey house.

 Work your hives only when necessary
The SHB has the curious behavior of breeding and multiplying when a hive is disturbed.  A beetle population can be relatively stable for some time, coexisting undetected within a hive.  But if the hive is manipulated, they become very prolific, and the population can explode quickly.

 Don't give your bees too much room
Adding an extra brood box or honey super too soon will lower the density of bees in the hive per surface area of comb.  This sparse distribution of bees makes it much more difficult for the bees to detect and defend against SHB.  Only add an extra hive box when the topmost box is at least 70% full (7 frames out of 10 are completely filled with brood and/or honey).  Consider using a slatted rack to maximize the brood distribution in the bottom brood box.

Treatment
Once you have detected the presence of SHB in one of your hives, you must take immediate action.  Perform the following steps:

 Determine the presence of SHB in all your hives
Using one of the above detection methods, immediately test for SHB in all the hives in your apiary.  If SHB is not detected in other hives, continue to use the cardboard detection method for the remainder of the warm season to ensure that SHB do not migrate to these hives.

 Remove food supplements from the infested hives
If your hives are infested with SHB, you should immediately remove and discontinue using all supplemental food inside the hives, including sugar syrup, grease patties, extender patties and pollen patties.  The syrup and patties are a rich food source for the beetles, encouraging their rapid spread throughout the honeybee colony.  The presence of supplemental food within the hive makes SHB control very difficult and endangers both honey production and the colony's survival.  A better alternative is to use an external bucket feeder for dry feeding, in or near the apiary, which may be used to administer dry sugar, pollen substitutes and terramycin soluble powder.

 Treat each infested hive with CheckMite+
The CheckMite+ Strips product (coumaphos), manufactured by Bayer, controls SHB when used strictly according to the label instructions.  Please refer to Using CheckMite+ to Control the Small Hive Beetle (SHB) for detailed instructions.

 Drench the soil with GardStar
Y-Tex GardStar 40% EC Livestock and Premise Insecticide (permethrin) is used to control SHB by breaking the brood cycle.  The beetle pupates in the soil, and this insecticide, when used as a soil drench, kills the larvae and pupae in the soil.  Even though GardStar is highly toxic to bees, it is applied to the soil directly in front of the hive.  If applied correctly, there is little chance that it will come in contact with the colony.

 Inform your state apiary inspector
The state apiary inspector, usually affiliated with your state's Department of Agriculture, needs to know about confirmed cases of SHB, both to control its spread and to document its occurrences.  The inspector may choose to inspect your apiary directly to determine the extent of the infestation and how appropriate your measures are to control its spread.  They may also suggest changes to your procedures to achieve maximum effectiveness for your prevention and treatment methods.


http://www.beecare.com/indexDynFrames.htm?http://www.beecare.com/Bees/Metamorphosis.htm&1
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Acts2:37: Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles, Men and brethren, what shall we do?
38: Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.
39: For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call.
40: And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation
asprince
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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2009, 08:12:59 PM »

When they get bad enough.........this will work!


http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,1974.0.html

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,11252.0.html
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Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
Ross
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WWW
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2009, 12:05:32 PM »

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www.myoldtools.com
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gwalker314
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« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2009, 01:11:47 PM »

I have 1 hive that has a bad SHB problem. This weekend I added a bottom board oil trap from Greenbeehives.com. I also sprinkled ground cinnamon along the edges of the frames in my 2 brood boxes. The beetles scattered when the cinnamon was added. After I closed up the hive    ( 5-10 minutes) there were over 20 SHB's dead in the oil trap. I checked the trap 24 hrs later and there were 200 or more beetles dead in the trap.
Maybe the cinnamon drove them out of the hiding spots and the bees forced them into the bootom board oil trap? Whatever it seems to be working!  grin


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SlickMick
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« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2009, 05:10:21 PM »

I have 1 hive that has a bad SHB problem. This weekend I added a bottom board oil trap from Greenbeehives.com. I also sprinkled ground cinnamon along the edges of the frames in my 2 brood boxes. The beetles scattered when the cinnamon was added. After I closed up the hive    ( 5-10 minutes) there were over 20 SHB's dead in the oil trap. I checked the trap 24 hrs later and there were 200 or more beetles dead in the trap.
Maybe the cinnamon drove them out of the hiding spots and the bees forced them into the bootom board oil trap? Whatever it seems to be working!  grin





That's an amazing result.. well done


Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
SlickMick
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« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2009, 05:11:43 PM »

Ross, that is SHB

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
Joelel
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Location: Dallas,Texas


« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2009, 06:47:12 PM »



This sounds great,
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Acts2:37: Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles, Men and brethren, what shall we do?
38: Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.
39: For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call.
40: And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation
gwalker314
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Location: Mc Calla, Alabama


« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2009, 02:56:43 PM »

Update on the SHB cinnamon/oil trap. Its been 1 month since I posted that I installed the bottom board oil trap I made from greenbeehives.com's website. As I stated before I have been sprinkling ground cinnamon along the edge of the frames whenever I have to look inside the hives. After 24 hrs of this method I am pleased to report that neither of my hives have any sign of the SHB's to date except for 1 beetle outside the hive and less than 10 dead in the oil traps. The cinnamon appears to have no effect on the bees as both hives are very bee strong and putting away stores.
I have talked with another beekeeper who used only the cinnamon sprinkle and he didn't get the same results as me with the oil trap. My theroy is the cinnamon drives them out of their hidding places and the bees drive them into the oil trap. I am just glad something is working. Please post any info about your hives if you are using this method.

GW
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Lone
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« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2009, 01:23:29 AM »

Hello GW,

Cinnamon sounds like a good easy idea.  Where do you put it, and what do the bees think of it?
I use a kind of bottom board oil/cidar vinegar trap too.

Lone
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gwalker314
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« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2009, 12:35:35 PM »

Hi Lone,

Whenever I have to open the hives I sprinkle the cinnamon along the the back and front of the boxes where the end of the frames rest. That's where I always saw most of the beetles hiding. The bees do not seem to mind the cinnamon at all. The hives do have a sweet cinnamon aroma after awhile. I have not added cinnamon while supers were on, so I'm not sure if it would affect the honey taste. I have also added cinnamon on the inside edges of my ventilated inner cover just to keep the beetles from hiding up there. My hives are not in full sun and I usually keep the entrances reduced. I am a very new beekeeper and this method seems to work for me, if it changes I will be sure to let you all know.

GW
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Lone
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« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2009, 07:55:08 AM »

Thanks, GW, I'll keep this in mind.

Lone
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weBEE Jammin
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« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2009, 07:06:55 PM »

I also had a bad case of AHB this year. I installed plastic beetle traps that fasten to the inside of an empty frame. It has three sections, with the two outside ones filled with veg oil. The middle one has a mixture of banana peel, applecider vinegar and sugar water. The entrance on top is only big enough for the beetles to fit thru. The beetles drown in the oil!
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