Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 21, 2014, 06:13:32 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Italian to Russian requeening  (Read 5257 times)
TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2009, 12:08:55 PM »

  The varroa resistance is appealing, but folks around here also talk of their tendency to swarm a lot.



when they first started raising Russians they did swarm a lot, but the last few years they have cut the swarming way down with selective breeding, the Russians I work with now are real gentle and hardly ever swarm, it's a big difference from a year's ago Russians, they are some real nice bee's, I have been working with a member ( Dwight Porter) of the Russian Queen Breeders Association for about 4 years now, I have one of those Russian breeder queen mothers in my back yard now that I am going to raise from crossed with my feral's to see how they do... there are only 17 members in the Russian breeder program so dont think there are a lot of people, most big time queen breeders get there breeder queens from these members, most are crossed with other lines when you get them from the big breeders, if you get your queens from the members of the Russian breeder program you will get the good Russian queens, they have strict breeding guide lines to keep the Russian lines as pure as possible... 
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
qa33010
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 912


Location: Arkansas, White County


« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2009, 11:22:44 PM »

    I am enjoying my Russians also.  They are great and mellow and have made extra honey when others have not in the area.  I do watch them a little more but not for getting defensive.  They seem no different than the mutts when it comes to size of hive, the more they have the more defensive they get.  But they are very stable.  Neighbor has Italian and one hive stays hot even with requeen, while the other is touchy.  I'll stick with russians and mutts.

     I am in the middle of town, so for me a hot hive is not an option.  I had a hot swarm (Italian, watched them leave and caught them and was told to keep 'em if I wanted them) hive last year and killed it off.  The large hives concentrate on me, when I get deep into them, and are back in the hive before I have finished cleaning up after myself.  This time of year I will not bother them except a quick peek at the supers, waiting for the goldenrod and aster.
Logged

Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
troutstalker2
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 212


Location: Hickory, North Carolina


« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2009, 09:47:49 PM »


  I have just the opposite to be true. I'm going from Russians to Italians. I thought Russians were hot. The calmest seem to be a mutt swarm I got this spring, but they look as if they are Italians. They are at least one generation Farrel as I got them from a house they were living in and it was at least the second swarm from that hive this year. I guess it just the luck of the draw, but for now I'm going with Italians.

David
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.278 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page October 18, 2014, 01:24:43 PM