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Author Topic: Should I separate the brood boxes to sugar dust?  (Read 1271 times)
sarafina
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Location: Houston, TX


« on: August 04, 2009, 12:32:51 AM »

The last time I sugar dusted my hives, I used 1 cup of powdered sugar for each deep and separated the deeps.  I don't have any honey supers on right now - just the 2 brood deeps.

Can I just pull the top off, sprinkle 2 cups into the top box, brush it off between the frames and button her back up?  I use screened bottom boards on both and will install the trays to catch and count the mites.  Not having to pull the upper deep off will save my back, but if it is not as effective a treatment, then I will do it.
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qa33010
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Location: Arkansas, White County


« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2009, 02:51:06 PM »

    Yes!!!  It worked fine for me.
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sarafina
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« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2009, 11:21:24 PM »

    Yes!!!  It worked fine for me.

Which way worked fine?  Using 2 cups for a double deep in the top deep only?  I assume the powdered sugar filters down, especially as they groom if off each other/
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Mason
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Location: Marietta, GA


« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2009, 06:00:21 PM »

It doesn't look like I have the reserves to rob this year.  I'm going with chemicals and building for next year.

Apiguard is my selection.  I had SHB probs and nothing beats a healthy hive.  I don't see any reasons to take any chances with holistic approaches when I know the chems will do the trick and give me the best opportunity for strong hives next spring.  Since I am not robbing my hives this year it seems like a no brainer.

Do you want to know how to get rid of SHB?....................roach killer.
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Former beekeeper until March....maybe next year...RIP
kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2009, 06:23:58 PM »

apiguard works well.  did you have a mite problem this year?  it's kind of spendy so for that reason i don't treat if i don't have a lot of mites.  all hives will have some no matter what you do.  keep that in mind as you decide on what to do. 
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sarafina
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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2009, 11:00:12 PM »

It doesn't look like I have the reserves to rob this year.  I'm going with chemicals and building for next year.

Apiguard is my selection.  I had SHB probs and nothing beats a healthy hive.  I don't see any reasons to take any chances with holistic approaches when I know the chems will do the trick and give me the best opportunity for strong hives next spring.  Since I am not robbing my hives this year it seems like a no brainer.

Do you want to know how to get rid of SHB?....................roach killer.

*nevermind*  I read your other thread and understand where you are coming from.  Good luck with your hives!
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Mason
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Location: Marietta, GA


« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2009, 01:18:49 PM »

I did an inspection yesterday evening.

98% complete termination of SHB.  They were all dead around the base of the hive. V-I-C-T-O-R-Y!!!!!!  I did treat with Apiguard as well.  No sign of mites anymore and the hives are thriving.  Strongest ever to date.  Most threads will back me up on a healthy hive is the best defense to parasites.

My point is that you can't argue with the effectiveness of chemicals.  I owe it to the bees as their keeper to give them the best possible chances to survive.  Next year I am hoping I will need less drastic methods IF I am lucky enough to get some honey.

I got my bees late this year and we had an enormous amount of rain that effected the pollen flow. (according to more experienced beekeepers)  I didn't stand a chance of excess honey.
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Former beekeeper until March....maybe next year...RIP
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