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Author Topic: cleaning up SHB frames?  (Read 1176 times)
paulh
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Location: NY State


« on: August 16, 2009, 11:01:33 PM »

I've got two deeps loaded with (what I suspect are) HSB larvae.  How do I "clean" these up?

I attended a class yesterday at a well-respected bee lab, and the instructor described small, white, maggot-like worms crawling through the comb, but said they aren't SHB, and he didn't know what they were.  I'm pretty sure they are SHB.  This hive was from a trap-out that had problems, but looked hopeful.  Then, within one week, the colony was devistated, robbed-out and now is loaded with these "worms".  I did see a couple of adult beetles in there, but the larvae it eveywhere and what little honey is in there is rotting and slimy.  There is still some capped honey in the corners.

Can these frames be cleaned up by the bees at home?  I've seen some SHB in my 2 colonies at home, but they seem to be under control and not an issue.  I'm certanly NOT putting these frames in my healthy hives, but maybe I could leave them out for the bees to clean up?   huh
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SlickMick
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Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2009, 03:47:36 AM »

Sounds to me like SHB definitely.

Get yourself a big tub and put some water and detergent into it. Hose off the frames into the tub.. just make sure the larva go in also. The detergent breaks down the surface tension and the beetle and the larva will drown. Freeze the frames for at least 24 hours. This kills all stages of the SHB. Let your bees rob out the rest of the honey.

I hope you are being proactive with your other hives

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
asprince
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Location: Fort Valley, Georgia


« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2009, 07:39:25 AM »

Mick is correct, what you have described is a typical SHB mess. I usually just wash off the frames off with the a garden hose, shake out the excess water, and freeze. Any remaining maggots will be killed. When the frames are thawed and placed in a strong hive, the bees will clean them up.

Steve
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Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
SlickMick
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Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2009, 08:32:17 AM »

Paul, in relation to your first post, I have seen SHB larva less than 1/8" long. So if you see them they will certainly grow bigger.

Hope it goes well

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
paulh
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Location: NY State


« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2009, 06:44:48 PM »

Who's got a freezer big enough to hold two deeps?  oh yeah... I just happen to have a spare, and currently empty, chest freezer in the cellar!  I really do! 

I was disappointed a few weeks ago when I found the vendors I had called were currently sold out of the digital temperature controller I need to turn that freezer into a "kegerator" for homebrew.  I guess I'm not too unhappy about it now as both deeps slid right in with NO room to spare on the sides.  Excellent!   

How far will the larvae crawl?  Not too far I hope.  While I did bag up both deeps to transport home, there were still about 100 in the bed of my truck and the chicken I put in there didn't pay any attention to them let alone eat them.  The larvae all bee-lined   rolleyes to the light and ended up in the driveway. The deeps sat in the yard all night and dozens of bees had made their way in.  I know some larvae got knocked out into the lawn as well.  I suppose I should have left them bagged up.

Thanks for the advice, fellas!

And yes, Mick, I took a closer look: worms of all lengths up to ~1/2" were found. Some very, very small.   

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asprince
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Location: Fort Valley, Georgia


« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2009, 07:14:22 PM »

I am not surprised that the chickens would not eat them! Fire ants won't eat them either. They are demons from hell!

Steve
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Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
SlickMick
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Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2009, 11:02:12 PM »

Paul, thanks for keeping in touch.

You will probably have to leave the deeps in the freezer for a few days until the cold gets right to the centre of the hive.. Too bad about the home brew chest  grin

There is probably not much that you can do about the larva that got into the ground. The observation about them heading to the light is spot on. In the hive they fall to the floor and head to the entrance where the light is.

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
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