Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 01, 2014, 12:05:48 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What works for insulating inner covers  (Read 3510 times)
Tyro
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 115


Location: North Dakota


« on: July 18, 2009, 08:06:48 AM »

After losing most of my hives last winter to moisture problems, I have converted my inner covers to the 'All Season Inner Covers' found at the Honey Run Apiary site.  On the site, Tim uses 2" insulation placed in the well of the cover in order to insulate the top in the winter.  I am curious to know what others use and how different materials work for them.  I am pretty far north and look at rough winters, so am trying to make the best insulating decision possible.  Thanks

Mike
Logged
Bee-Bop
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 689


Location: Southern Missouri


« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2009, 09:09:52 AM »

I built mine, I have 3 holes covered with wire, I take a piece of cardboard and cut out the center hole, then  fill the cover with wood mulch, being sure the larger pieces are over the third center hole, which can bee cleared off for jar feeding.

A neighbor also adds a old rug mat on top of the mulch.

I also cut a closable  slot on the bottom of the board as a top exit.



Bee-Bop
Logged

" If Your not part of the genetic solution of breeding mite-free bees, then You're part of the problem "
contactme_11
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 344

Location: Springfield, MA


« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2009, 09:30:53 PM »

I've heard of people using hay inside of the all season covers. I made my own design of these and they've been in use all year. I plan to use hay this winter.
Logged
charlotte
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 140


Location: WI


« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2009, 12:21:50 PM »

I keep a shallow super on top with good quality insulation (R40) on all the time.  Then I put a screened inner cover on under that super for the summer.  They get ventilation from the screen & I think that the insulation helps maintain the hive temp...cooler when it's really hot & warmer when it's cold.  In the winter I use an inner cover I got from Mann Lake that is wood, not the masonite, so condensation doesn't drip down.  I put some screen over the hole in the middle.  This year I am going to put some old calf huts over my hives for added protection too.  Good Luck! Smiley
Logged

Sleep is overrated!
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5314


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2009, 12:52:27 PM »

I have the HoneyRun inner covers on all my hives and they work so great.  Never have any moisture problems in the winter, and not bearding in the summer.

In the winter I just place the insulation back in that came with the covers.  Of course, I have extremely moderate winters out here.  We do get cold (20-30's) but only in the mornings and only for a couple of months.
Logged
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5314


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2009, 01:04:58 PM »

Hey Beebop
I like that idea of the little cover to open and close that top entrance.  I sometimes place a screen over that hole in the fall to prevent robbing, but when we get those really bad rains that are slanted, I always wonder how the bees are doing and if I should have closed up those entrances.

What did you use for that?  What is that piece called???
Logged
Bee-Bop
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 689


Location: Southern Missouri


« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2009, 05:34:32 PM »

Annette;
That is a piece of scrap aluminium, from a storm door.
It is pivited on a small nail,it has a small notch [ covered by lid ] towards the end which closes on to a small nail head which you can see, to lock it in place, also a small nail head it leans against when open.

I keep it open most all the time, except if I am feeding from the top, or have placed honey frames to be cleaned out, this prevents robbers from a close entrance.

Blowing rain I don't believe is a problem, the slot hole is I believe 5/16 by 1 1/2 in. the box is 3/4 in thick so  I think very little water would be blown onto the frames of the hive, it would run down the inner hive box wall then out the bottom entrance.

I should post some better pictures of my homemade equipt/junk.

Thanks for the comment.

Bee-Bop
Logged

" If Your not part of the genetic solution of breeding mite-free bees, then You're part of the problem "
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2009, 05:48:08 PM »

I just put door shims between the upper most box and the inner cover.  Never had problems and keeps the moisture out.  The outer cover covers the crack enough that a draft doesn't blow directly in the hive.
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
Bee-Bop
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 689


Location: Southern Missouri


« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2009, 06:02:27 PM »

I just put door shims between the upper most box and the inner cover.  Never had problems and keeps the moisture out.  The outer cover covers the crack enough that a draft doesn't blow directly in the hive.

Ok, I take it your not talking about All Season Top Inner Covers, from Honey Run ??

Thanks any way

Bee-Bop
Logged

" If Your not part of the genetic solution of breeding mite-free bees, then You're part of the problem "
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6405


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2009, 07:13:46 PM »

I took Finsky's advice. I just use a piece of 2" rigid insulation (foil faced so the bees don't chew it) in place of an inner cover.  Condensation occurs at the coolest part of the hive.  If the top of the hive is better insulated than the sides, you have no worries of condensation dripping on them.  I know "cold doesn't kill bees", but I also know heat retention helps them survive. Wink
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2009, 09:57:08 PM »

Quote
Ok, I take it your not talking about All Season Top Inner Covers, from Honey Run ??

No, standard inner covers.
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
BeeHopper
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1122

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2009, 03:44:21 PM »

This coming winter, I will switch back to an inner cover of my own design and use Beemax's Foam Telescoping outer cover for insulation.
Logged
Tucker1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 314


Location: Pullman, Washington

"The Morning Breaks, The Shadows Flee.....


« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2009, 07:31:36 PM »

I use a standard cover, but have tried wrapping discarded foam insulation around the hive. The foam insulation seems to work well and is easily removed come spring. I suspect you could use sheets of Styrofoam as well.

Regards,
Tucker1
Logged

He who would gather honey must bear the sting of the bees.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.533 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page September 30, 2014, 03:09:53 PM
anything