Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 25, 2014, 03:45:12 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ventilation Holes  (Read 2337 times)
Beecharmer
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34

Location: Rosedale, IN


« on: March 30, 2005, 05:23:16 PM »

Hi,

I am new to the beekeeping world and will be receiving my first nuc of bees this April.  I have been reading all I can find on the subject.  What I am wondering is, what is everyone's opinion on a ventilation hole in the upper hive body?  That is fine, but then I read about reversing the hive bodies to prevent swarming.  Now the hole will be on the bottom.  Do you plug it somehow?  Make a new one in the top hive body?
Logged

"Outside of a good book, a dog is a man's best friend: and inside a dog, it's too dark to read."  Groucho Marx
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2005, 05:39:59 PM »

This is one of the areas you are going to get several different ways to ventilate. Some drill holes in each hive body right below the handle. Some raise the top cover by placing small chunks of wood under it. Some use open bottom hives. Some screen bottom boards. And some use a combination of some of those.

 Did I miss a few? Probably.
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6412


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2005, 06:47:48 PM »

I like to use ventilation boxes (similar to the DE hives) above the inner cover.  This provides plenty of upper ventilation, while preventing the bees from using it as an upper entrance.  I also find it handy to set supers on during inspection, keeps them off the ground.

click image for larger view

They can be any size, but I prefer the size of a medium super,  a Quart mason jar feeder fits nicely inside.




click image for larger view
« Last Edit: December 04, 2007, 03:01:25 PM by Robo » Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


beemaster
Site Founder
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6255


Location: Manchester, NJ

It is my pleasure to bring the forums to you.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2005, 08:15:14 PM »

Beecharmer - BEAUTIFUL AVATAR!!!!!

I'll be going with Screened Bottom Boards this season. Bees (by the way) were flying well this morning, they went through a tremendous amount of honey the last month - SPRING is indeed a real killer, their activity level is raised and consumption seems to increase with the anticipation of replenishing food sources, which sadly don't always come in time.

As Robo has pointed out in a previous post concerning this topic many months back, a small screened hole will likely get filled over come winter - but they won't do anything with vent holes as Robo has in the photo (the one with the internal feed jar - which obviously doesn't vent in that photo) but does when using that super as a upper super filled with frames.

My point (I do get to them eventually - lol) is good venting is a superior way to twart swarming and the sooner the better. In our Chat Interview with Howland (I think you were there??) he said it isn't made for mite control, but for estimation of the degree of a mite problem. But the SBB seems to be the best way to STABLIZE the air temps in the hive WITHOUT causing a chimney effect - which could be an unwanted thing.

Example: if you have good top venting, you will also have a good flow of honey, wax and bee smell filling the air and flowing in the wind possibly attracting opossums, skunks, bears and more.

Using a screened bottom board equalizes the temps well by allowing air outside and inside even out, but doesn't have as much of a DRAFT, the air sort of dead-ends in the hive (compared to the ventbox) just a thought.
Logged

NJBeemaster my YOUTUBE Video Collection
Follow us on TWITTER
SKYPE NJBeemaster - include your FORUM NAME in contact request
My Personal FACEBOOK Page


"All donations to our forums are greatly appreciated"
Please click HERE to help support our forum.
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6412


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2005, 08:29:33 PM »

Quote from: beemaster
- but they won't do anything with vent holes as Robo has in the photo (the one with the internal feed jar - which obviously doesn't vent in that photo)


Actually there is ventilation with the feeder jar,  it is just not visable in the picture.



Quote from: beemaster

Using a screened bottom board equalizes the temps well by allowing air outside and inside even out, but doesn't have as much of a DRAFT, the air sort of dead-ends in the hive (compared to the ventbox) just a thought.


I believe this is a valid concern as well,  that is why I keep a piece of ridgid insulation on top of the inner cover until night time temperatures warm up.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Beecharmer
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34

Location: Rosedale, IN


« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2005, 10:49:29 AM »

Actually I have a screened bottom board.  Does that mean I do not need additional ventilation?  I was not present during the chat interview.  I like the idea of the internal feeding jar.  Where do you purchase the vent boxes or did you make them?
Logged

"Outside of a good book, a dog is a man's best friend: and inside a dog, it's too dark to read."  Groucho Marx
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6412


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2005, 11:50:45 AM »

Even with a SBB you will still need ventilation from the top during the winter at a minimum,  year round doesn't hurt.

I made mine,  just a box with some holes drilled in it and some screen stapled to the inside of the holes.   Just make sure the holes are low enough that when you put on the telescopic cover, they aren't blocked.
 
I just copied/modeled mine after the DE hive.   I think the ventilation box is sufficient and don't see the need for the bigger more elobrate covers with the DE hive.  The DE hive also has screen on the inner cover holes which prevents bees from getting into the ventilation box.  I found that you then get ants/spiders/etc taking up home in the ventilation box.  By letting the bees have access, they keep it pretty inhabitant free.  I have never had issue with them building comb in there either.  I'm sure if you crowded them enough you might.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.184 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page October 20, 2014, 05:25:58 AM