Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 24, 2014, 09:41:01 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: My first cutout; AT&T cabinet  (Read 3492 times)
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« on: July 14, 2009, 11:04:23 PM »

This was my very first cutout. An AT&T junction cabinet that had a volleyball-sized hive behind the kick plate. Everything I knew about cutouts I picked up from reading this forum, but I felt comfortable enough to agree to try.

The only woodenware I had was two shallow supers taped together to make an extra tall deep, with ten deep frames. The bottom had #8 cloth stapled on. I made a travel cover out of plywood and a couple frame bars the night before.

We opened the cabinet with weather getting rainy. I thought about just holding off, but they were so gentle, I thought I'd risk it. I smoked them and started cutting out comb. I accessed the cavity from behind the hive, so I was starting with the newest comb and working my way up to their entrance.

I cut out comb and put it into the frames with rubber bands. It was starting to sprinkle. By the time I had just about all the comb removed it was raining in earnest. With the comb framed up, I put the box by their entrance and smoked up the cavity. Never saw the queen, but no fear.

I left the hive there for them to adjust and rob their old honey. I’ll pick them up in a few days and bring them home. I'm really excited about this.

What I used:
ten frame hive box
smoker
hive tool
rubber bands to hold in comb
dust pan

What I want next time:
Bee vac
Spare shirt

stings = 1
« Last Edit: July 15, 2009, 02:24:56 PM by charles » Logged

4 hives
fermentedhiker
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 514


Location: Midcoast Maine


« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2009, 11:10:17 PM »

Congratulations.  Sounds like you did great.
Logged

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
--Douglas Adams
Natalie
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1478

Location: Weymouth, Massachusetts


« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2009, 11:14:19 PM »

Congratulations on the cutout. I just did my first one on July 4th.
I had brought alot of stuff but ended up using the same list of tools as you except I also used a tarp, trash bags and a vaccum since I had to cut into the plaster in a bedroom wall.
I do have a rubbermade tote full of all the gear I made need in the future for a cutout, you just never know what you will need for sure.
There is a great list on the site that a couple of people made up for items you will need for a cutout.
I found it very helpful.
I nailed screened inner covers on the bottom and the top of the hive body for bringing the bees home, its especially good in hot weather and easier to secure than hardware cloth if you are by yourself.
I hope this colony does well for you. Best of luck with it.
Logged
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11668


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2009, 07:24:39 AM »

Congratulations, but...


We would like to see pictures! Wink


...JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2009, 07:48:15 AM »

Congratulations, but...


We would like to see pictures! Wink


...JP


It was imbedded in the first word of my OP, but here's the link. I'm afraid I didn't take very good ones, but you can get the general idea.

Click here to see the pictures.
Logged

4 hives
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2009, 09:30:42 AM »

I nailed screened inner covers on the bottom and the top of the hive body for bringing the bees home, its especially good in hot weather and easier to secure than hardware cloth if you are by yourself.

Natalie,
How do you get the screened cover off the bottom of your hive body when you get home? Seems like that would be a difficult move with the bees still inside.

For myself, I'm thinking about making this hive a top-entrance deal when I move it home. That way, I only need to replace the cover, if that. Everything else is pretty much done, even in its current shape.
Logged

4 hives
Natalie
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1478

Location: Weymouth, Massachusetts


« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2009, 12:28:53 PM »

Its easy enough to pull off with your hive tool. I just set it down on the ground next to the hive I have set up for it, then I pry off each side with the tool while pulling up on the box with the other hand and then I set the whole thing right on top of the bottom board.
It takes all of one minute.
Logged
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2009, 01:06:27 PM »

Saw something neat...

I went down to check on them. I saw quite a few bees clustered at their old entrance and lots of flying around and some agitation in temperament. So I moved the hive box so that the front corner almost touched the front corner of their entrance and then wedged a piece of empty comb in between the cabinet and the hive body. Almost instantly, the bees on the old entrance moved onto that piece of comb and the hive body. And within a minute or so, the mood went straight to tranquil. I guess they didn't want to crawl on the ground, but didn't know quite how to get over to their new home.

Also, I was afraid with all the rain that I'd see lots of dead bees. I didn't. Yay.
Logged

4 hives
joker1656
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 349

Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana


« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2009, 03:42:07 PM »

Nice job!!!  thanks for the pics
Logged

"Fear not the night.  Fear that which walks the night.  I am that which walks the night, BUT only EVIL need fear me..."-Lt. Col. David Grossman
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2009, 08:06:18 AM »

I brought them home last night.

Instead of going out there after dark, I noticed that a real gully-washer was heading this way, so I went down there to get them in it. There were still a hundred or so bees hanging around the old cavity doing things, and I thought, maybe I should wait a couple more days. But then I saw a bee leaving the hive box with a small larva in her mouth. I thought, uh-oh. I better move them now. So I got the lid ready to close and waited a few minutes. Felt the pressure drop. Felt the down draft. And then came the downpour. The flying stopped. I closed the lid and put them in the truck and drove home.

I got home, put them on a few bricks to keep them off the ground and opened the lid. Understandibly agitated, but I know for sure they're not AHB.

So that's that. I'll give them a week or so and see how they're doing. Meanwhile, I'll need to get somebody to make some real hive boxes for me. At least two. One for my new hive and one for the next cutout/swarm call I get!!!
Logged

4 hives
mswartfager
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 74

Location: Northwest PA


« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2009, 08:25:55 AM »

I'm looking to make my first cutout from the ceiling of an old cement block milk house at a farm.  I've several concerns, but you mentioned that you didn't see the queen, but no worry.  I guess the idea is that if the comb and brood are removed from the ceiling (in my case) and are placed in the hive box I provide, then the queen will follow?

Any other tips?  This is my second year.

I hate getting stung.
Logged
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2009, 10:41:35 AM »

I'm looking to make my first cutout from the ceiling of an old cement block milk house at a farm.  I've several concerns, but you mentioned that you didn't see the queen, but no worry.  I guess the idea is that if the comb and brood are removed from the ceiling (in my case) and are placed in the hive box I provide, then the queen will follow?

Any other tips?  This is my second year.

I hate getting stung.

Well, I'm no expert by a long shot. But I said no worries because I knew all the brood was in the hive box and the workers would drive the queen over there, if she hadn't been killed during the removal. That might be a different story if you are not leaving the hive box there while they shift over to it. In that case, I would think a bee-vac would be the best bet.

Don't like stings? They're not enjoyable, but it comes with it. Like Lawrence of Arabia said, "the trick is: not minding that it hurts."
Logged

4 hives
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2009, 07:22:38 AM »

I looked in on them yesterday. They are building comb very quickly. And I spotted the queen. All is well.

Oh, and they are still mad at me. Can't blame em. I really put them through a lot.
Logged

4 hives
1reb
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1698

Location: Warren,Arkansas


« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2009, 09:10:49 PM »

Charles
Congratulations on your  cutout
Johnny
Logged
charles
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


Location: Green Cove Springs, Florida


« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2009, 08:55:57 PM »

Update:
They hadn't built much in a week, and were out of stores. Obviously small and weakening. I moved them into a new deep box I had built, still with a top entrance and screen bottom. I took one frame each of brood and honey from another hive and put in there on 7/25. I noticed quite a few hive beetles which I killed when I could. I didn't see the queen, nor did I notice any eggs. But they still act queenright. My guess is they are hungry. I'll check their honey storage this weekend and see if I want to give them another honey frame. I thumped them tonight and noticed a quiet but sharp hiss. There just aren't that many, but they are acting normal. I'm hoping they'll find a good flow here in August and come along in time for winter.

I have them in a shady area. Should I put them in the sun to help manage shb?
Logged

4 hives
Animator
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 51

Location: Ft. Lauderdale area


WWW
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2009, 11:05:51 AM »

Be careful with the hive beetles. Everyone seems to agree that the sun is the best thing. One small advice I have is DO NOT USE POLLEN substitutes to build your hives. (AT LEAST in Florida !)

I am teetering on the edge of losing 2 hives that I tried to get greedy and add pollen to.

Keep us posted. Good story.
Mike
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.215 seconds with 23 queries.

Google visited last this page July 21, 2014, 04:29:10 AM