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Author Topic: question about freezing comb honey  (Read 2821 times)
joker1656
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« on: July 10, 2009, 10:45:07 AM »

I know that it is advisable to freeze comb honey for roughly two days to prevent any probs with moths.  Do you freeze it inside a container?  When it is thawing do you vent the container?  I am just concerned about the condensation.  I am pulling my first comb honey super today, and just do not want to spoil it.  Actually my first super period. 

Any advice out there?
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Natalie
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2009, 12:06:26 PM »

I have only ever seen it frozen inside of the container.
After you cut it you let it drain over a rack, a queen excluder works well and then you package it and freeze it.
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annette
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2009, 12:39:40 PM »

I was always curious about the draining part.  Why drain it?? Don't you want the honey to be inside the wax combs???

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Irwin
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2009, 01:05:08 PM »

You drain where you cut the rest is caped.
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2009, 01:26:05 PM »

Brilliant!!!  Now I understand.
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joker1656
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2009, 01:34:26 PM »

To clarify my question.....how do I avoid condensation on the comb honey when I thaw it?  Should I vent the container it is in, or leave it closed?

I look at stuff I wrote sometimes and think "what the heck did I just say".   huh grin  Anyway, thanks!
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NasalSponge
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2009, 04:39:30 PM »

According to Richard Taylor....it is best to freeze it then simply unplug the freezer and let it warm to room temp inside the freezer.
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joker1656
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« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2009, 05:29:45 PM »

well, a deep freeze dedicated to comb honey would be nice, but I don't have that option.  Oh well.  LOL 

On that note...If I just freeze the whole super as soon as it is removed, could I thaw it without it being inside something, or should I put it inside a bag or something. 
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kdm
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« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2009, 06:08:19 PM »

 Put the containers or a whole super, if you want, in a plastic bag & seal it with tape. When you take it out of the freezer let it warm to room temperature before you open the bag. the moisture will dry on the outside of the bag. 
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luvin honey
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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2009, 10:42:26 PM »

I have a topbar and most of my honey (fingers crossed) will be comb honey. To understand this question better, is the idea to kill the larvae or eggs of the wax moth that might be dwelling in the comb? Thanks! Great question!
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Natalie
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« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2009, 09:36:14 AM »

Freezing will kill both but I believe the goal here is to only be pulling combs that are clear of larvae. Freezing the combs will kill the eggs and prevent them from hatching out in the comb later.
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joker1656
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« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2009, 10:10:22 AM »

Yes, Natalie, I think that is the goal.  Killing eggs not larvae.  Dead or alive the larvae would be a little unappetizing.  LOL

I pulled my super, and got some great comb honey.  It is in containers, tupperware from around our house, in the freezer.  I will give it a couple days, and then thaw it inside a bag.  We have eaten quite a bit of the fresh stuff up anyway. 

The honey that we salvaged from draining is, to me, extremely clear.  Very mild sweet honey.  I like a bit of a bite, but this is still outstanding.  Tastes better when you have a hand in the production. 

Can't beat living with bees.   grin
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lakeman
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« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2009, 10:24:35 AM »

Will anything froze in any type container, bag, carton, sealed jar, plastic container, not sweat if thawed in the container before opening it?
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Vibe
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« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2009, 11:24:57 AM »

Will anything froze in any type container, bag, carton, sealed jar, plastic container, not sweat if thawed in the container before opening it?
"Sweating" is the moisture in the air condensing on the container. So anything cold in contact with warmer humid air will collect moisture. If what is inside the package is something that you do not want more moisture added to it, then you should let it thaw and warm to room temp before opening the seal. Otherwise the moisture will collect into the product.
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lakeman
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« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2009, 12:32:59 PM »

Will anything froze in any type container, bag, carton, sealed jar, plastic container, not sweat if thawed in the container before opening it?
"Sweating" is the moisture in the air condensing on the container. So anything cold in contact with warmer humid air will collect moisture. If what is inside the package is something that you do not want more moisture added to it, then you should let it thaw and warm to room temp before opening the seal. Otherwise the moisture will collect into the product.

Ah, yes, thank you.
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