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Author Topic: Here we go again "yellow jackets"  (Read 7565 times)
annette
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« on: July 10, 2009, 12:24:37 AM »

sorry

I did a search and learned a lot on how to get rid of them.  they have turned extremely aggressive lately on one of my hives and are pushing the honey bees off the landing board onto the ground and then 100's of them attack in a frenzy.

Today I went up with a shovel and was smashing them, I am sure it did no good, but sure made me feel better.

Anyway I made up 2 traps today following the post of MB, banana, vinegar and sugar in a bottle.

My question is, about those store  bought traps from the hardware store.  Do honey bees stay away from them, and are they effective as well?Huh

Awaiting your reply

Thanks
Annette



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manfre
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2009, 01:11:52 AM »

If you have a video camera, you should capture that. It sounds like it would be interesting to see.

I take a more proactive approach to killing yellow jackets since I only want to get rid of the ones in certain locations, which I usually find when they sting me while mowing. Wasp spray in to the nest at dusk works every time.
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2009, 09:45:34 AM »

I use the store bought traps and they work great. The bees are not attracted to them. They work best in early spring when you can catch the queens. I also directly spray any nests that I find.
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annette
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2009, 10:38:03 AM »

Wish I could find the nest!!
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2009, 12:24:48 PM »

I saw a television program once about yellow jackets in Hawaii.  They are not native to Hawaii so they were out trying to kill them.  They would put a piece of meat on the ground and wait for a yellow jacket to come along.  When the yellow jacket left they would walk a ways in the direction that it flew and put down another bait.  They repeated the process until eventually they cam across the hive.

The theory being they eat and then head back to the hive.

Might work..........

might just be a walk through the woods with a can of dog food
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annette
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2009, 12:34:02 PM »

Interesting and if all else fails, you will see me walking around with a piece of meat (which is no small feat as I am a vegetarian grin)
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2009, 01:59:23 PM »

fellow veggie here, yet i have no qualms about killing (and eating?!? evil) yellow jackets!

We searched out a nest last year that was pestering and robbing a weak hive. Didn't use bait, but followed in the general direction and did progressively broader circles. They were nesting in the ground, in some open field terrain; which I learned is common. And these underground nests can be HUGE!!

NOTE: the clear indicator there was a nest was GREEN GRASS encircling a hole (mouse hole size) in the earth. The grass all around was brown but for the nest entrance. Evidently the moisture generated by them living in there (and transporting water?) was enough to keep the grass somewhat lush.

Hope this helps & good luck! They are wicked and deserve to die! evil p.s instead of spray we used 1 pint of gasoline: Pour and seal entrance with soil. It is the fumes that kill. ...OK, no arson humor now...
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RayMarler
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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2009, 02:51:50 PM »

The last nest I found got a can of hairspray flame thrower treatment!
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« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2009, 03:51:43 PM »

I hate Yellow Jackets!  Haven't seen any lately thank goodness.  Let us know how the traps work.  If your having trouble finding the nest just take your riding mower and cut everything in sight.  Sooner or later they will let you know when you get there. grin
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« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2009, 09:30:00 PM »

The last nest I found got a can of hairspray flame thrower treatment!

WD 40 or starting fluid and a lighter was what my dear old grandpa used to use....seconded by the gas poured on them! I would not recommend either one! Just too many things can go wrong and someone or something might get hurt or worse.

Brenda
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« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2009, 10:17:07 PM »

I have a nest in my house right now. I am getting wasp spray, they are in the walls, two holes two nests. dont think gas or hairspray is a good idea LOL ,, then again maybe it is. hehehe
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« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2009, 10:33:55 PM »

annette, you might want to try something like cat food (canned) or some other kind of meat leftovers in your trap.  the sweet bait might attract your bees as well as the yellowjackts.  i have them too.  they get in the hay, under stuff on the ground, etc.  my husband got stung up one year when he scraped up an old tarp with the tractor.  they had made a nest in the ground under the tarp and they came out mad!  be careful.
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2009, 11:37:17 PM »


Does anyone know a type of bee that looks like a minature yellow jacket?
I have seen some bees that look like miniature yellow jackets working the flowers in my front yard, along side my honeybees and some bumbles.
I have actually seen all 3 working the same flowers at the same time but I am wondering what type of bee it would be.
It has the shiny black and yellow bodies but looks to be at least half the size of a regular yellow jacket.
Any ideas?
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c10250
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« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2009, 10:34:43 AM »

I have a nest in my house right now. I am getting wasp spray, they are in the walls, two holes two nests. dont think gas or hairspray is a good idea LOL ,, then again maybe it is. hehehe


I've found that the BEST way to get them out of a house is to take a little SEVIN dust and put it on an evergreen branch.  Place the branch over the entrance so that the bees need to crawl through the dust prior to entering their nest.  It works wonders.

I can't tell you how many cans of wasp killer I would go through, and still see bees coming and going.

Ken
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RayMarler
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« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2009, 10:45:56 AM »

C10250...
That sounds like a Great idea, thanks for that tip!
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c10250
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« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2009, 11:55:40 AM »

No problem for the tip.  Glad to be of help.

Anyway, after using a couple of cans of wasp killer in my house wall (outside), I decided I was going to really teach them a lesson, and taped a shop-vac hose right outside their entrance.  I let the thing run all day.  It was pure enjoyment watching that hive entrance!  It didn't do much to kill the hive off.  That's when I had the idea of the branch and sevin dust.

Ken
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gwalker314
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« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2009, 09:58:48 PM »

Before I became a Beekeeper this year I waged all out war on Yellow Jackets. I had several underground nests in my yard. I read a researcher in CA found that Frontline dog & cat flea killer (1-2 drops to a can of cat food or tuna) will kill the nest by the foragers taking baited meat back to the nest where they feed the brood. I tried the method a year & half ago and I have not had a yellow Jacket problem since. I would only do this towards the middle or end of summer because thats when the YJ's are searching for meat more than sweets. To keep local pets and critters from getting the baited meat I placed the can in a birdgage to allow the YJ's in and out.
I tried the store bought traps and they captured a lot of yellows jackets but just like honeybees the YJ's kept putting out new foragers. Hope it helps

GW
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annette
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« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2009, 04:47:20 PM »

Well the banana, vinegar and sugar in the bottle did not work to good.  Just a few dead YJs, so today I bought a store bought trap and will install it today.

On a more positive note, the yellowjackets are not acting as aggressively these past few days.  Could it be that the hive is getting stronger??? I had just combined this hive with another nuc and now the populaton is much better
The Yellowjackets sense this and act differently??


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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2009, 11:55:07 AM »

sorry

Anyway I made up 2 traps today following the post of MB, banana, vinegar and sugar in a bottle.


What kind of bottle? Do you have a picture? I am having exact same problem with hornets. Could you please post a picture or drawing of your trap?
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annette
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« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2009, 12:23:01 PM »

I am at work now, but will explain it

1 cup sugar, 1 cup vinegar, 1 banana peel. Mix together and place inside a plastic water bottle.

Take a knife and cut out a little hole near the top of the bottle, about the size of your finger.

Hang a few feet from the hives.

OK that is how to make the trap, but actually it never really worked that great. Only caught a few yellowjackets with the trap. I went to the hardware store and bought a trap there that works like a charm and hundreds of yellow jackets are now floating in water.

The trap I purchased is non toxic and just has an attractant you place in the water.  Boy, oh boy it worked so great.  I am actually going to purchase a few more this week.
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« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2009, 11:37:45 PM »


The trap I purchased is non toxic and just has an attractant you place in the water.  Boy, oh boy it worked so great.  I am actually going to purchase a few more this week.

ОК thank you! And what`s that called? i mean an attractant.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 01:50:05 AM by shemer » Logged

tlynn
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« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2009, 12:38:31 AM »

We had them everywhere when I was growing up.  My dad would take a coke bottle and fill it with gasoline and go to the nest at night and shove the bottle into the hole.  Next day no fuzzy yellow things circling around anymore, which was nice because I was the one who always got stung!
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shemer
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« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2009, 01:47:19 AM »

We had them everywhere when I was growing up.  My dad would take a coke bottle and fill it with gasoline and go to the nest at night and shove the bottle into the hole.  Next day no fuzzy yellow things circling around anymore, which was nice because I was the one who always got stung!

well my problem is I don`t have a qlue where they set up the nest
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2009, 01:54:06 AM »

Got a swarm call today from a local firefighter, got my name off the forum by googling beekeepers in Anacortes.  He wanted to know how to get rid of a yellow jacket nest.  It is 12 feed up on a rafter in his barn.  He said it was the size of a basketball and the YJ's took after him as soon as he opened the bard door.
I advised him to take a cloth sack or pillow case and climb up and fit the sack around the next then cut it lose from the rafter.  The take the whole thing, nest YJ's and sack and burn it.  Doint it at dusk would get most of the YJ's.  Best way to get rid of a hanging paper nest I know of.  Since He's a firefighter he just might get a call someday to use the same trick again.
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« Reply #24 on: July 21, 2009, 02:38:28 AM »

I advised him to take a cloth sack or pillow case and climb up and fit the sack around
I sure hope he won`t forget to dress properly. Fire fighters protective clothing could have come handy.
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annette
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« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2009, 12:42:50 PM »


The trap I purchased is non toxic and just has an attractant you place in the water.  Boy, oh boy it worked so great.  I am actually going to purchase a few more this week.

ОК thank you! And what`s that called? i mean an attractant.

a little plastic tube that came with the trap. It was sold separately also and was called "Yellow Jacket Attractant". That is all the info I have about it. Don't know what it is, but it smelled very strong.  And by the way, the trap is totally filled up with the yellowjackets. Hardly any flying around my hives.

And it is non toxic, they are attracted to the stuff, they fly in the trap and cant get out and they drown in water.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2009, 12:54:58 PM by annette » Logged
Dane Bramage
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« Reply #26 on: July 22, 2009, 02:59:08 PM »

I read a researcher in CA found that Frontline dog & cat flea killer (1-2 drops to a can of cat food or tuna) will kill the nest by the foragers taking baited meat back to the nest where they feed the brood. I tried the method a year & half ago and I have not had a yellow Jacket problem since.

Now that is the kind of solution I've been looking for.  I'll give it a shot.
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« Reply #27 on: July 22, 2009, 08:56:33 PM »

Like the flea killer hint' Have a neighbor that called me yesterday about a YJ problem. I will relay the hint'

As far as traps bait them with meat. a skewer through a piece of bacon or Bologna suspended in the two liter Bootle over water with a little dish detergent. The dish detergent keeps the YJ from dipping in the water and getting out. But only a temporary fix.

Finding the nest: as kids we would hang a piece of raw fish in a tree and when they cut a piece off trail them back to the nest as they fly. As in bee lining it may take several attempts to narrow down area.

Or catch the sun right and you will see a steam leaving the ground just like seeing your honeybees in the sunshine when leaving the hive. We always looked at the head of the yellow jacket (thorax). If solid black it was in a swamp or thicket or azalea bushes etc. If it had markings like this (ll), the nest is in a field or located in a bank or hillside. Different type of YJ and nesting behavior. WE just called them hill, field, swamp and thicket YJ's. We have very few of the above ground builders in my area.

We then used a railroad/ highway flare to put them to sleep and dig up the nest. Why??? Great bluegill bait grin
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RayMarler
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« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2009, 12:33:47 AM »

OK, here's my story.
Lots of YJ's policing the ground in front of the hives. Tried Frontline in tuna, no go. So I tried the tuna by itself, no go. Tried bologna, no go. Tried some cooked pork fat, hey, they like that more than the weak bees on the ground!

Took me a small water bottle, cut off the top at the shoulder of the bottle. This makes the top be a funnel. I invert this funnel into the now topless bottle, creating a funnel pointing down into the bottle. I put in some pork fat, cooked (trims off the sirloin I BBQ'd the other night  grin ). Added some gravels out of the driveway for weight. Set bottle in yard. Watched it collect 15 or so YJ's in an hour or so. Went out and shook the bottle so it damaged all the YJ's so they had no way to get out and set back on ground. This is working great. Made me up a couple more of these traps and set them out.



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Natalie
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« Reply #29 on: September 20, 2009, 09:31:00 AM »

May have to try this idea, I saw a yellow jacket sitting on the fence post eating the head of one of my honeybees the other day.
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« Reply #30 on: September 20, 2009, 09:45:43 AM »

Ray;

Your bottle trap works good.

A hint if I may;
If you have one, a easy & fast way to attach the top & bottom is use your desk paper stapler, 4-5 staples bingo.

Bee-Bop
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« Reply #31 on: September 21, 2009, 12:14:56 AM »

Hi Annette:  I had a heck of a time with hornets this year.  I tried the idea of poisoning the hornets using cat food with dog tick medicine. (Making sure the poison was out of reach by cats, dogs, etc.). That worked. The hornets really liked the cat food.  I tried traps and that worked somewhat.  In fact the traps would fill up with hornets in a very short period of time. (Perhaps, I needed more traps. I had only three.)  Still the hornets kept coming back in large numbers. So, for the next few days, I stood by the hive for about 20 min. at a time, with a fly swatter. I would do this 3 times a day.  I ended up killing alot of hornets. To bring the hornets into the area of the hive quicker, I would partially remove the top cover. The smell from the open hive seem to attract them quickly.

Eventually, I got the situation under control. The hive appears to be able to drive out the 1 or 2 hornets I've seen trying to enter the hive. All of the ideas above worked, however the sheer number of hornets made controlling them a problem.   In eastern Washington this year, hornets/yellow jackets have been a real problem.

Good luck with yellow jackets.


Regards,
Tucker
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RayMarler
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« Reply #32 on: September 21, 2009, 12:15:21 AM »

Natalie,
Yes, please do and I hope it works for you!

Bee-Bop
Yeah the stapler would work, but mine fit tight when I pushed it in and then I can remove it easily to clean and restock the bottle if I want. I tried one with packing tape wrapped around the bottle at the seem, but the tape gives off an over powering smell and the trap was ignored. So my next ones I was careful when cutting the top off and now it fits in tight when pressed in. So glad it's working for you. I was going crazy around here with all the yellow jackets. The bees were keeping them at bay just fine, but they were driving me nuts!
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RayMarler
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« Reply #33 on: September 21, 2009, 12:17:17 AM »

Hi Tucker,
I guess I'm going to have to spring for a can of cat food. I'd like to find something they like that I could "bait" for them to kill off the nests.
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Tucker1
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« Reply #34 on: September 21, 2009, 10:46:14 PM »

The cat food worked great as a bait. I also used in in YJ traps, when the attractant was gone.  The idea that Ray suggested looks like a cheaper solution to the purchased traps. Using home made attractant would keep the cost down. You could also use the dog/cat flea poison in cat food idea. (Just make sure that only YJ's can get to it.  I found that the cheap cat food was smelly and seems to pull in the YJ.  Good luck getting rid of them.

Regards,
Tucker1
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« Reply #35 on: September 22, 2009, 01:53:39 AM »

Canned cat food or dry? Which brand and kind of cat food do the black and yellow striped fighter jets like? I'm thinking it's canned huh?
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« Reply #36 on: September 22, 2009, 08:54:45 AM »

we used 1 pint of gasoline: Pour and seal entrance with soil. It is the fumes that kill. ...OK, no arson humor now...

Gasoline is a soup of synthetic chemicals.  Very small amounts will contaminate the soil, vegetation and groundwater.  Much of the MTBE contamination of groundwater has been caused by people fueling small engines such as lawn mowers and chainsaws and spilling tiny amounts.  Some of the synthetic chemicals move through the soil much faster than water.  Pesticides are probably more "environmentally friendly" than gasoline.

Ether (starting fluid) or alcohol is a better alternative.
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« Reply #37 on: September 22, 2009, 10:20:19 AM »

Suspend a piece of bacon or bologna in the top of the trap with a skewer or nail etc. Fill the bottom of the trap with a little water with a few drops of dish detergent. Scentless detergent better. The detergent breaks the water surface tension. The YJ fall in and can't get out. a two liter bottle works good or an open baking pan with bait suspended over water.

They also like fish if you have access to a small bream ---- that's what we used to hang on a limb for them to cut a piece and we would track them back to nest.
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« Reply #38 on: September 22, 2009, 12:08:45 PM »

Ray:  I've used canned cat food.  The cheap stuff.  It also works in the YJ traps, when the regular attractant wears out.
Good luck with the YJ's.

Regards,
Tucker1
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« Reply #39 on: September 22, 2009, 11:21:49 PM »

I am going to try the canned cat food next season.  This year they are pretty much under control now.  I ended up using the store bought traps and they worked so good, but very costly.

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« Reply #40 on: October 22, 2009, 02:45:07 PM »

Just wanted to let ya all know you helped me again with my yellow jacket situation.   This is a great board.  YJs are bad here right now.

Thanks,
Corinne
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