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Author Topic: Feeding question - yes I did search!  (Read 1012 times)
ziffabeek
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« on: July 09, 2009, 08:21:09 PM »

Hey, it's me again.

I have a feeding question, well a duo really.  I did a search on feeding here but didn't see an answer that really fit.

It seems that most people here feed pretty regularly, and most of the questions are when is too early or when is too late.  I am wondering how do you know if you need to feed?

I haven't been into my hive yet. (I know I know I CAN'T WAIT!! but I'm planning on going in on Saturday when I can do it in the middle of the day and it's supposed to be sunny, I read that that is the best time and since it will be my first time I thought that would be good, especially since it's been a little cloudy and windy this week.  Plus I'm waiting on my veil's to get here. )

anyway, I haven't been in yet, but tonight my bees seem to be much less active and aren't hanging on the porch like usual.  They are still flying in and out some adn I saw one or two with orange sacs full, but they aren't really hanging outside much, like before.  It has been cooler, and I removed the props from the top cover that I did to give them more air, thinking maybe they are cold now, but I'm worried that they are hungry.  So how do you know if you need to feed them?  I live in the city of Atlanta, so not really any fields, just yards full of flowers.  What should I look for on Saturday to know if I should feed or not?

Secondly, someone said you can fill a ziploc baggy with 1:1 and then cut a small slice in it, and place it between the inner cover and the outer cover and that is a good way to feed to cut down on robbing.  Has anyone else heard of this?  I don't have much (any) equipment and there aren't any stores in Atlanta, so I was thinking this would be a good way to try.  Any opinions? Ideas?

Thanks for any help.  I'm learning so much reading here, but mostly I'm learning that I know nothing!

ziffa
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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2009, 08:45:28 PM »

If your hive weighs less than a hundred lbs., then you need to feed.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
homer
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2009, 08:59:21 PM »

If your hive weighs less than a hundred lbs., then you need to feed.



Here is some very useful information.  Thanks to Robo and Michael Bush!

http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/feeder-compare/

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfeeding.htm
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homer
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2009, 09:03:28 PM »

If your hive weighs less than a hundred lbs., then you need to feed.


I would think that this statement really only applies to a hive going into winter.  Lots of hives weigh less than 100lbs and don't necessarily need to be fed.  However, if you're not harvesting any honey, I don't think it would hurt anything to feed.

When you open things up, if they have much honey stored in the brood boxes they can survive just fine without feeding.
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ziffabeek
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2009, 09:17:03 PM »

iddee,

I can't decide if your adorably cantankerous, or just have a dry sense of humour.   Wink

I don't think I could possible ever know if my hive weighs 100 lbs.

Thanks for the links homer! I'll go read up.  Michael Bush seems to have soo much information!

love,
ziffa
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SlickMick
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2009, 10:23:39 PM »

Ziffer, if you can't lift it, it is a hundred pounds at least grin

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
sc-bee
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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2009, 10:30:48 PM »

>Secondly, someone said you can fill a ziploc baggy with 1:1 and then cut a small slice in it, and place it between the inner cover and the outer cover and that is a good way to feed to cut down on robbing.  Has anyone else heard of this?  I don't have much (any) equipment and there aren't any stores in Atlanta, so I was thinking this would be a good way to try.  Any opinions? Ideas?

I have feed with ziplocks. You need a spacer to allow for room for the ziplock on top of the chamber (brood box). Lay the bag gently, right on top of frames where you are feeding and cover with an empty super and place top on (telescoping cover etc).  a couple small slits in bag about 3/4 full.

I prefer hivetop feeders using jars. Easy to make out of scrap plywood etc, and easy to access to feed.

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John 3:16
sparks
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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2009, 10:43:13 PM »

I guess you could haul your bathroom scales out and weigh each hive box and add them up. rolleyes

I personally will feed a new install until they decide to not take it or I want to steal some honey.  My nuc that I installed 11 weeks ago went off the syrup when I put the fourth medium on the top.  Two weeks later I pulled out three full frames of my first honey.  The 2 new packages are still sucking syrup from top jar feeders at a rate of about a quart every three days.  I will let them do that until they have pulled comb in three 8 frame mediums.  Just my $.02 worth.

I hope you enjoy your first trip into the hive this weekend.  It is quite a thrill to see all the goings on in there.    Let us know how things look.



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sc-bee
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« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2009, 11:09:40 PM »

>My nuc that I installed 11 weeks ago went off the syrup when I put the fourth medium on the top.  Two weeks later I pulled out three full frames of my first honey.  The 2 new packages are still sucking syrup from top jar feeders at a rate of about a quart every three days.

Three full frames of honey or sugar water huh Just curious.
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John 3:16
iddee
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« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2009, 11:25:55 PM »

If you can estimate what 50 lbs. is, just lift the back of the hive. If it feels anywhere near 50 lb., the hive weighs close to a hundred. If it is all you can do to lift it, it weighs more than a hundred. The flow is mostly over in Atlanta, so your bees need enough to last them until the fall flow, then during and after the fall flow, you need to prepare for winter. They can process and store sugar water now much easier than they can in Nov. and Dec.

>>>>I would think that this statement really only applies to a hive going into winter.<<<<

In many areas, as many hives starve in July and August as do in Jan. and Feb. If the hive is too light now, they will not make it to the fall flow.

The hundred lbs. is an estimate. It will vary with the number of bees, amount of brood raised in the next 3 months or so, the mini-flow of summer in different areas, ETC. Basically, it means feed until it is heavy when you lift the back of the hive.

Yes, I'm a cantankerous old goat that tries to disperse the best info I can with the fewest words typed.  Smiley
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
ziffabeek
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« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2009, 07:24:33 AM »

Thanks for all the replies and great information.

And iddee thanks for the explanation.  I'm sorry I made you type more words  Undecided but now I understand much better.  I will test the weight tonite, but I'm thinking I need to start feeding. I don't want my ladies to go hungry!

Thanks again! Wish me luck tomorrow!

ziffa
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