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Author Topic: Video of Comb Collapse Aftermath  (Read 3128 times)
Grandma_DOG
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« on: July 03, 2009, 12:49:07 AM »

Ugly Ugly. This was my first hive I ever had. Quite sad.

18 combs dominoed and tanked. I was able to salvage some honey. 12 pounds.

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annette
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« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2009, 12:51:39 AM »

What made it do that???
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Grandma_DOG
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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2009, 01:26:18 AM »

What made it do that???

Not sure, but 105 F days weaken it some. Beek error is also likely. I inspected it on a 100 F day last, and 1 Honeycomb failed while I was there. I also removed a old failed comb they glued to the front wall.

This hardiman modified hive TBH design is too deep and the bars too short for high temperature region like Central Texas. This was my first hive, I recognized the design flaw and all my other TBHs are shallower with longer bars, giving the combs 30% less stress.
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annette
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« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2009, 12:15:08 PM »

Well good to know this because I plan on having a TBH one day and so this design seems flawed.  You see we also get temps into the 100's all summer.

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oldenglish
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« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2009, 03:05:27 PM »

So far no similar problems with mine, but it does not usually get that hot here. Mine are in full sun so on a 90 degree day its gonna bake pretty good. My dimensions are 17" (15" usable) by 12" deep
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joker1656
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« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2009, 03:10:28 PM »

That is a bummer.  Sorry that happened.  angry
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KeyBeeper
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« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2009, 03:45:14 PM »

I agree the design is flawed - the top bars are too long and cannot support the weight of so much honey/pollen/brood in hot climates.  I've considered building a TBH with shorter bars, no more than 12inches, maybe less - but haven't gotten around to it yet.

Well good to know this because I plan on having a TBH one day and so this design seems flawed.  You see we also get temps into the 100's all summer.


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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2009, 03:59:18 PM »

I did a Tansanian in the Langstroth deep dimensions and had the same results, a domino collapse.  But others seem to have succeeded with the same dimensions.  I went to a medium depth after that (basically a one by eight with a bottom on it which was 7 1/4").  I haven't had any serious problems with it.  Seems like I had a comb fall off ones or twice in the last five years,or so,  and always my fault, but never a complete collapse.
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Grandma_DOG
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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2009, 12:14:05 AM »

To clarify, the design flaw was due to the KTBH being too deep. Too much stress near the top stretches comb till failure on 110F days. The fix is to make the KTBH shallower but wider to hold the same volume. So making the bars wider is good, less stress at top per linear Top Bar inch.

I agree the design is flawed - the top bars are too long and cannot support the weight of so much honey/pollen/brood in hot climates.  I've considered building a TBH with shorter bars, no more than 12inches, maybe less - but haven't gotten around to it yet.

Well good to know this because I plan on having a TBH one day and so this design seems flawed.  You see we also get temps into the 100's all summer.


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Yappy
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« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2009, 01:01:36 AM »

Hard lesson,
couldn't see from video but if you are not using 1-2 inch foam board in the Top cover, it may save the comb from over Direct heat transferred Through the wood. I understand that the bees if they have water they can cool the Air.
 
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TwT
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« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2009, 05:41:49 AM »

depth could cause that if the top bars aren't rigid (thick) enough, seems with the depth they draw out the comb and thin top bars will sag causing the comb to break loose. I would say the main problem if that the top bars aren't rigid enough to hold that much comb, how deep were the combs when they broke?, with those top bars you would have to make the depth of the hive shorter than the comb that broke was drawn out. from the video I think the weigh on the thin top bars was the main reason, the heat helping but not the main reason. when top bars bend it tears the comb.. but its hard to tell by the video but just looks like thin top bars.
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mjdtexan
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« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2010, 03:12:48 PM »

So, what did you wind up doing? Were you able to save the colony? Could you have picked up the combs and start over in that hive until you could have replaced it?

 afro
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Wine Maker
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Grandma_DOG
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« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2010, 01:35:52 AM »

Well, I saved it, but mother nature said "no go".  It floated away in a flood.  We found the hive and lid, some of the bars, but bees don't swim well, I'm afraid.

So, what did you wind up doing? Were you able to save the colony? Could you have picked up the combs and start over in that hive until you could have replaced it?

 afro
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mjdtexan
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« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2010, 10:43:44 AM »

Yall flooded over there in Austin? I hadnt heard that. Its rained a great deal here but no floods.
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Wine Maker
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