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Author Topic: split question  (Read 890 times)
trapperbob
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« on: June 27, 2009, 10:29:17 AM »

I am fixing to make a split in a five frame nuke with one frame of eggs, one frame of emerging brood, and three frames of honey. I don't want to feed sugar water just frames of honey. And was wondering how fast I can expect them to burn through the frames of honey? I am not putting a queen in this they will be making one of their own, hopefully.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2009, 07:49:29 PM »

I am fixing to make a split in a five frame nuke with one frame of eggs, one frame of emerging brood, and three frames of honey. I don't want to feed sugar water just frames of honey. And was wondering how fast I can expect them to burn through the frames of honey? I am not putting a queen in this they will be making one of their own, hopefully.

If you want the nuc to retain sufficient ppopulation to go about the activities in a hive you'd best exchange one of those frames of honey for one of brood. 
Why?
Because, once the brood cells a re capped they will no longer consume food sources and that will use up 1 frame of honey, the bees can live on the other frame while awaiting the queen and the cells from any hatched brood plus what is emptied from consumed feeding it to the brood will be filled from foraging bees.  The general rule of thumb is to put 3 frames of mixed brood/eggs, 1 of honey, and 1 empty frame so the bees have something to work on while awaiting the queens hatch.

I just did 1 where I used 5 frames of mixed brood, with eggs in queen cells, plus 1 frame of honey and 4 frames to work on as the quantity of brood in each frame was at the max so once it was all hatched it would cover 10 frames.  After trying it a few times I like doing my splits intodouble stacked nuc boxes as I can put more frames into the split, making it stronger, provide more stores and still have several frames for the bees to expand onto and work on drawing comb.
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charles
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2009, 08:14:00 PM »

The general rule of thumb is to put 3 frames of mixed brood/eggs, 1 of honey, and 1 empty frame so the bees have something to work on while awaiting the queens hatch.

Brian, would that be true of medium frames as well as deeps?
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2009, 08:33:17 PM »

No matter if you have 10 frames of honey and you want to raise a good queen feed that hive untill the cells are capped, even in a heavy flow!!!!!!!!!!!
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doak
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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2009, 08:42:25 PM »

First off I would not go a 5 frame for rearing a queen. Even deep.
You need 10 frames and plenty bees. AS TwT said, feed regardless.
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Grandma_DOG
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« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2009, 09:29:14 PM »

You guys are talking about making a 10 frame nuc!  I think the question was for a 5 frame nuc. 

What is wrong with the old 1 frame eggs, 1 brood, and 1 honey plus some extra bees?
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trapperbob
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« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2009, 10:41:38 PM »

I made the split this weekend and the frame of capped brood I put in was starting to emerge so this should give them something to work on and if they need any more I thought about just pulling a frame from one of my hives and giving it to them. The double stacked nuke box ideal was something I thought about and if it looks as if it is needed I may do that yet. This is a experiment that I'm doing and the plan is to get them eventually to fill ten frames as full as possible and then put a candy board on and try to winter them over in the single deep. Then if all goes well split them as many times as I can in spring. If it works I get more hives if not I examine what went wrong and learn from it.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2009, 01:36:36 AM »

You guys are talking about making a 10 frame nuc!  I think the question was for a 5 frame nuc. 

What is wrong with the old 1 frame eggs, 1 brood, and 1 honey plus some extra bees?


No we're talking of making a strong nuc.  Using a double stacked 5 frame nuc (10 frames total) gives more options, better strength, and just works better, in my experience.  You can do a 3 frame nuc but it is going to take all the rest of the summer to develop into a single medium or deep.  A double stacked nuc will expand faster, it has much to do with verticle verses horizontal demensions, which makes a huge difference in how rapidly a hive can expand.

The general rule of thumb is to put 3 frames of mixed brood/eggs, 1 of honey, and 1 empty frame so the bees have something to work on while awaiting the queens hatch.

Brian, would that be true of medium frames as well as deeps?

Depth of frame is immaterial.
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