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Author Topic: young lady finds a way to kill SHB's  (Read 7973 times)
Cheryl
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« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2009, 07:13:48 PM »

I don't think she specified HOW she used the peroxide........ Here's what I remember:

Summary -- High School student wins blue ribbon at science fair, for discovering a way to eliminate Small Hive Beetle: She keeps several hives, the first of which she lost to SHB. Using this as a science opportunity, she conducted lab tests on numerous honey samples. She discovered that Hydrogen Peroxide, naturally occurring in Honey, was elevated when ever the bees were under duress or stress. She then used hydrogen peroxide - in an unspecified way - to eliminate SHB herself.

THAT is the mystery. Perhaps bigger companies don't want us knowing, eh??
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G3farms
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« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2009, 11:09:15 PM »

It might have been pulled so that she can get some kind of patents on any equipment she designed. I still bet it is something very simple.

My bet is she feed it to them or had somekind of board they had to go across and it rubbed on them.

G3
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Cheryl
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« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2009, 11:53:04 AM »

Aren't SHB drawn to pollen? I know little about them, being a new beek, I have no firsthand knowledge... yet. You can believe I'm all ears, though.
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mgmoore7
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« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2009, 12:55:31 PM »

Aren't SHB drawn to pollen? I know little about them, being a new beek, I have no firsthand knowledge... yet. You can believe I'm all ears, though.

Yes, they are drawn to pollen.   If you have honey supers that are clean of honey but there is some pollen here and there, they will lay in the pollen.

I have also heard that using pollen patties can attract them quit well although I have not used pollen patties so I don't have 1st hand knowledge.
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beee farmer
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« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2009, 02:52:20 PM »

If it worked that well and I would guess she used a very simple application method either her or unknown others might possibly be "spinning" setting up test verification trials and trying to figuring a way to capitalize on the discovery;.
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« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2009, 04:18:18 PM »

maybe she made hydrogenpatties grin

G3
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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
Cheryl
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« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2009, 08:36:00 PM »

maybe she made hydrogenpatties grin
MMMMMMM HYDROGEN PATTIES.......... /Homer drool

Actually, that was my first thought regarding baiting SHB in that way. I'll bet it would work. Even outside the hive, if it draws new adults, it would significantly reduce the SHB egg-laying in the hives.
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« Reply #27 on: July 11, 2009, 08:29:55 PM »

 I emailed the TV station twice last week inquiring about it.  No responce.
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Cheryl
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« Reply #28 on: July 11, 2009, 09:19:49 PM »

I'll bet that if SHB eats pollen laced with H2O2, their tummies asplode from bubbles.

Too bad I don't have any beetles to practice on.........  Undecided
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« Reply #29 on: July 11, 2009, 09:23:19 PM »

I'll bet that if SHB eats pollen laced with H2O2, their tummies asplode from bubbles.

Too bad I don't have any beetles to practice on.........  Undecided

 dont worry, they are coming, they in texas pretty good from what I hear.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2009, 10:46:51 AM »

Someone in Ala, met the young lady. She was at a bee meeting in Ala. She was surprised her experiment had drawn so much attention.

Based on her comments, her experiment dealt with how there was elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide in honey when the bees were stressed by shb. I don't think any experiments were done using hydrogen peroxide to rid a hive of shb.

She has agreed to have someone post her experiment on the net.

(All this info is based on a post in another forum  evil, Don't shoot me moderator(s) grin. I'm not going to post the link I will let you look for yourself if you care too Lips Sealed)
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Cheryl
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« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2009, 12:37:50 PM »

So... the news clip about her science project was misleading?? Why on earth did they pull it? We have nothing to go on....

I'd love to see more!
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« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2009, 10:49:52 PM »

Here is the verbiage:

>Hello all,
Well I was at my local bee association meeting and Lydia McCormick was there. She is the young lady that won 1st place in the science contest about hydrogen peroxide & SHB.
I talked with her a few minutes about the project. Basically her research found that hives that had a large SHB population resulted in higer hydrogen peroxide levels in the honey. I believe she did add a bit of peroxide to the test comb and it killed the beetles present. Her project was not about a way to eliminate the SHB but to identify there was a problem with the hive due to stressed bees producing more hydrogen peroxide which is already present in the honey. She was surprised to hear that her project was a topic of discussion. She is going to email me the report and gave me permission to post it for all who are intrested to read. She also said she is going to do more research on this issue. Its a start and I am glad to see some young people working on possible solutions.
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Cheryl
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« Reply #33 on: July 30, 2009, 12:34:09 AM »

I found the press release: http://ftp://ftp.alsde.edu/documents/55/NewsReleases2009/5-19-09Science_Fair.pdf

The significant quote from that is: "The Effect of Honey Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration on Small Hive Beetle (Aethina tumida) Survival"
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gwalker314
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« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2009, 08:05:21 PM »

Lydia McCormick just sent me an abstract of her research for posting here.

Abstract:
Honeybees are the planet’s number one pollinator and, therefore, essential for our agricultural economy because plants depend on them for reproduction. Unfortunately, many health disorders can plague and devastate bee colonies. In the past five years, the small hive beetle (SHB) (Aethina tumida) has become a widespread problem, particularly in the Southeast. In Alabama, this menacing insect is now one of the most common invaders of bee colonies. While beekeepers have used a variety of non-toxic traps or chemical treatments to control SHB, it is also likely that honeybees have natural stress defenses. One possible chemical defense is hydrogen peroxide, produced by glucose oxidase, an enzyme secreted by bees into their honey. Previous observations (“The Effect of Honeybee Pathogens on H202 Content and Glucose Oxidase Activity in Honey”. Science Fair 2008) revealed that honey hydrogen peroxide concentrations were highest in beehives that had small hive beetle (SHB).

      The hypothesis that higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations in honey may decrease SHB survival was tested. Groups of 3-5 SHB were incubated at room temperature in containers with cut comb, pollen, and experimental honey for up to 3 months. Nine different experimental H202 concentrations (ranging from 0 mg/ ml to 6000mg/ ml) were added to two different types of honey, natural (raw) versus store-bought. Furthermore, two specific controls were included: 1) a positive control in which the honey was heated to denature protein (enzymes) prior to adding 1600 mg/ ml H202, and 2) a negative control in which honey was pre-incubated with excess catalase to remove native H2O2. Results showed decreased SHB survival after 14 days at concentrations above 1600 mg/ ml H202. By 22-28 days, reduced survival was apparent at 400-800 mg/ ml. At 98 days, all groups showed beetle death, with concentrations above 100 mg/ ml being severely affected. Furthermore, qualitatively, at the lowest concentrations (between 0mg/ ml and 100 mg/ml) beetles showed the most feeding activity as evidenced by feces and chewed combs bits. There was no difference in survival regarding the two honey types. In conclusion, these results suggest that honey H202 may be a natural long-term defense against SHB.

 Lydia McCormick - Jefferson County International Bacc.

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Grandma_DOG
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« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2010, 12:42:14 AM »

Has anyone experimented with this technique, yet?  I'd like some info on this, as I intend to do some experiments this spring with this.

-mt

Lydia McCormick just sent me an abstract of her research for posting here.

Abstract:
Honeybees are the planet’s number one pollinator and, therefore, essential for our agricultural economy because plants depend on them for reproduction. Unfortunately, many health disorders can plague and devastate bee colonies. In the past five years, the small hive beetle (SHB) (Aethina tumida) has become a widespread problem, particularly in the Southeast. In Alabama, this menacing insect is now one of the most common invaders of bee colonies. While beekeepers have used a variety of non-toxic traps or chemical treatments to control SHB, it is also likely that honeybees have natural stress defenses. One possible chemical defense is hydrogen peroxide, produced by glucose oxidase, an enzyme secreted by bees into their honey. Previous observations (“The Effect of Honeybee Pathogens on H202 Content and Glucose Oxidase Activity in Honey”. Science Fair 2008) revealed that honey hydrogen peroxide concentrations were highest in beehives that had small hive beetle (SHB).

      The hypothesis that higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations in honey may decrease SHB survival was tested. Groups of 3-5 SHB were incubated at room temperature in containers with cut comb, pollen, and experimental honey for up to 3 months. Nine different experimental H202 concentrations (ranging from 0 mg/ ml to 6000mg/ ml) were added to two different types of honey, natural (raw) versus store-bought. Furthermore, two specific controls were included: 1) a positive control in which the honey was heated to denature protein (enzymes) prior to adding 1600 mg/ ml H202, and 2) a negative control in which honey was pre-incubated with excess catalase to remove native H2O2. Results showed decreased SHB survival after 14 days at concentrations above 1600 mg/ ml H202. By 22-28 days, reduced survival was apparent at 400-800 mg/ ml. At 98 days, all groups showed beetle death, with concentrations above 100 mg/ ml being severely affected. Furthermore, qualitatively, at the lowest concentrations (between 0mg/ ml and 100 mg/ml) beetles showed the most feeding activity as evidenced by feces and chewed combs bits. There was no difference in survival regarding the two honey types. In conclusion, these results suggest that honey H202 may be a natural long-term defense against SHB.

 Lydia McCormick - Jefferson County International Bacc.


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lakeman
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« Reply #36 on: January 24, 2010, 08:08:56 AM »

Has anyone tried just spraying some hive beetles with HP? Would this hurt the bees? the honey?
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Jim 134
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« Reply #37 on: January 24, 2010, 09:00:26 AM »

I found the press release: http://ftp://ftp.alsde.edu/documents/55/NewsReleases2009/5-19-09Science_Fair.pdf

The significant quote from that is: "The Effect of Honey Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration on Small Hive Beetle (Aethina tumida) Survival"


  This link do not work  for me.


    BEE HAPPY Jim 134  Smiley
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« Reply #38 on: January 24, 2010, 10:32:35 AM »

The link was dead but using the info I came across another forum that someone posted that she mixed the 3% peroxide with honey to feed the bees and kill the SHB. I do not know if this is first hand facts or speculation. Now I am not able to find the article again. Is there anyone on other forum's that can search this and keep the information going ?
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« Reply #39 on: January 25, 2010, 03:13:35 AM »

Now we just need to know whether it is toxic to the bee and at what level.  If it is non toxic to bees at lethal levels to the shb you can treat without hurting bees.  If toxic to bees then a device has to be made to only allow shb access to the irresistible poisoned bait.
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