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Author Topic: New here as well  (Read 1679 times)
forteanajones
New Bee
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Location: Pacific Northwest


« on: March 25, 2005, 05:44:32 PM »

Hello all.  I'm new here, from Northern California, and am very impressed with this site.  I've thought about getting into beekeeping for a while but I lack expanses of outdoor space being in the suburbs, and my city has a 50-foot rule for beehives (why is this the case do you think?).

I was wondering, how many people here have suburban setups?  I have ideas about keeping the hive on the roof, but am concerned about getting into trouble due to the visible bee traffic (not to mention the visible mee traffic, wearing the required garb during maintenance).
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Beth Kirkley
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Location: Eastman, Georgia


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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2005, 05:56:21 PM »

Hello - and welcome!

I'm in the country, on 21 acres, so I can't help you on the suburb thing.... but others here can.

I don't know why they have to have rules like that. The reality about bees is......... that when they leave the hive, they begin to fly upward. Within just a few feet of the hive - 10-20 feet - they're above way above head level, and can even be as high as tree level. The bees fly high like this till they get to their destination, and then fly nearly straight down. The only place you see lots of bees is within 5 feet of the hive. So having a 50 foot area free of people/passage/walkways around the bees is just silly.

Government officials just don't understand the importance of bees in the world, nor do they understand that people are in no danger by having bee hives in their neighborhoods. (sigh)

I'll get down from the soap box. If anyone else wants to use it..... go right ahead. Smiley

Beth
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Jerrymac
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Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2005, 07:07:16 PM »

If it is OK to have bees in the burbs, but there is a 50 foot rule, then yes, put them on the roof. They would then be over the heads of people already. So what if they see you working your bees. If it's legal. One draw back would be that everyone would know you had bees and you would be blamed for every little thing that accures with any stinging insect.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
thegolfpsycho
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Location: canyon rim, ut


« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2005, 07:34:21 PM »

I have had bees in the burbs, and I've almost always placed them near a fence.  If you put them facing the fence, their first flight direction is up.  If the fence is 6 feet high, they will be over everyones head by the time they cross the property line.  Just look around before you start working them to be sure alot of activity isn't happening in the neighbors yards.  Bees don't normally look for someone to sting, but once riled up, they become a bit less choosy.

Roofs are hot, usually sloped, and far enough from the ground to make a fall something to avoid.  Adding stinging insects is a recipe for.. um....As a beginner, you want access to them to be easy, not an extreme game.  If you have no yard, get an observation hive.  They are fascinating.
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forteanajones
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Location: Pacific Northwest


« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2005, 08:06:12 PM »

Great replies...

I'm glad to say that most of my roof is flat, and I just realized that my carport roof offers me the possibility of creating an easy-access hole from below.  So theoretically I might not be required to visibly ascend to my roof at all and could work with the hive whilst remaining unseen, behind my fence.

Neat idea about the observation hive, I might just try that.

One last consideration: if I were to take my chances and then receive a warning, is it considered very bad form for a beekeeper to look for a new home for their hive in such circumstances? Smiley
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Jerrymac
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Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2005, 08:18:56 PM »

I wouldn't think so. I am just starting with bees this past two months I got my first bees out of walls. Already I have several offers for placing bees. I got room of my own, 5 acres, but these people want the bees around for pollenation of gardens and such. You might offer pollenation free of charge as trade for a place for bees.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
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