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Author Topic: Feeding sugar syrup? to much food available?  (Read 3024 times)
Michael Bush
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« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2009, 07:57:39 PM »

Sugar water is syrup.
HFCS is corn syrup.
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Michael Bush
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Joelel
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« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2009, 08:57:36 PM »

That does not tell you that I feed my hives more than when I first hive them.
It tells you exactly what I said, I need to feed all ten hives at the same time. I got ten packages at the same time and hived them at the same time and I need to feed them all at once.
Where is the mystery here?
As far as the syrup thing, you need to let that go. I don't know why you care that its called that but that is what it is called by alot of people.
I did not invent it but I do recognize the terminology therefor I can follow the posts here when people refer to feeding fall syrup etc.

But now that I think of it what do you get when you put sugar and water together and heat it?
What is syrup?
This is what the trusty dictionary says:
a thick, sweet, sticky liquid, consisting of a sugar base, natural or artificial flavorings, and water.
The juice of a fruit or plant boiled with sugar until thick and sticky.
a concentrated solution of sugar in water, often used as a vehicle for medicine.

For the nonsense you wrote at the end of your post, it makes no sense and you are trying to be oppositional as you have been in almost every post you have made here so far.
It appears that you are dragging another thread into this thread which is not allowed.
I enjoy the input of all the members here, do not get offended because I do not agree with everything you say or do not choose your advice. You are new here and you only just got your first hive with your son so I may be more inclined to take the advice of someone else and you should not take offense.

You do not seem to agree with anyone about anything on this forum and I am not sure why.
There are thousands of people on this forum and thousands of opinions which everyone is entitled to without being proved wrong by one member.
Being a new beekeeper you could benefit from the advice and knowldege of all the members of this forum if you were open to it.
Now this banter is not helping the person who started this thread because they needed help and it would be nice to let them get this back on track so they can get answers to their question.

OK,you boil your sugar water before you feed it to the bees,got ya.Guess you didn't read where I had bees back in the 80s. By the way your the only one started arguing with me.I find no other.
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Acts2:37: Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles, Men and brethren, what shall we do?
38: Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.
39: For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call.
40: And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation
Natalie
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« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2009, 09:02:14 PM »

No, I did read that you had 1 hive back in the 80s that died out and you didn't know why and you found a bunch of fire ants in it when you checked on them.
Your point is?
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Natalie
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« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2009, 09:19:39 PM »



You Said:
 
Great,someone else thought of a inter screened cover.We build our own as we build all of our hive,bottoms,bodies,supers,covers. Tell me,is the cover part of the hive when it's on the super or only when you have it on the body without a super ? Or is the cover part of the hive ?
[/quote]
That is a direct referance to another thread that you have a problem with.


 If you find no other you need to look a little harder. No one here ever started arguing with you. I tried to be helpful and explain the terminology and you jumped all over me.
You seem to be very combative and I am through explaining things to you.
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harvey
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« Reply #24 on: June 22, 2009, 09:46:45 PM »

Natalie,   Sorry for all the trouble this thread caused,  wasn't trying to accomplish all that.  I did mix up some sugar and water,  a little better than 1 to 1 and I put it in an old chick waterer.  I put rocks down in the resevoir so the bee's have something to stand on.  They seem to realy love it.  It is closer to the hive than most people say is good but I have not seen anyother bee's around it so far.  I went out there this evening and maybe 50 bees were in there drinking away.  I had to squeeze the bottle part to get more syrup out.  I think maybe it is to thick to flow out on it's own?  Anyway the bee's are gobbling it up right now.  This is a small swarm that came to my orchard and hung on one of my trees.  I first put them in a deep brood box that I had borrowed that had some drawn comb in it.  Then I bought another brood box from Dadent and put that on top after I saw they had put a lot of brood down in the first one.  They will have to draw comb in the new one as it just has the wood frames with Duragilt foundation.  I also bought two 6 and 5/8 inch supers.  Do you think two is enough in michigan?  I have seen some with three? 
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iddee
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« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2009, 10:40:35 PM »

>>>>Next,I never seen a screened inter cover in a store or on the net and never herd of anyone using them.<<<<

Tho I may get in trouble with Beemaster for advertising, I will tell you I sell and use screen inner covers regularly. How many would you like to have?  

As a poor kid living in the country, mom made pancake SYRUP by mixing 3 parts sugar and 1 part water. I am sure glad no one told her it wasn't syrup. We may have gone hungry.  
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Natalie
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« Reply #26 on: June 22, 2009, 10:43:37 PM »

Harvey, its not your fault at all, I wish your thread hadn't gotten off topic for you sake.
Usually the chicken waterers will flow okay, do you think the stones in the bottom of the reservoir could be blocking any of the slots where the water flows out?
I have had that happen myself.
I think alot of people use 2 deeps, I run all mediums and am doing 3 mediums for my brood boxes which is pretty close to the equivalent of 2 deeps.
I responded in your thread on equipment just a minute ago too so there may be some help for you in that thread as well.
If they are small right now you can play it by ear and see how well they build up for you but if they at least fill out 2 deeps and you can get a super or two on them I think you will be in good shape.
At this point its about getting them built up enough and get enough stores put away to get them to overwinter well.
I think its great that you are getting prepared with what you need down the line. I gave you a list of things that you need or might want in your other thread as well.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #27 on: June 23, 2009, 01:35:48 AM »

Hi harvey--I'm new, too, but I've been told it's best to feed bees INside the hive. Feeding OUTside encourages robbing by other colonies. Do you have a way of installing a feeder inside the hive? I have a Boardman with a Mason jar tucked in the back of my hive (topbar) and I know there a feeders specific to Langstroth hives.

Maybe your bees have enough of the real stuff around that they don't need to be fed! Can you see them coming back with pollen loaded on their legs?

Good luck!

A boardman feeder is a good way to attract robber bees since it places the syrup so close to the entrance.  Putting a feeder inside of a weak hive will only slow the robbers down if they are determined.  But feeding internally is much better than using a boardman feeder.  Open feeding, in the middle of the bee yard (amidst the hives) is also a good way to induce robbing.
However, open feeding is my choice of feeding method and here's why:
1. It feeds all the hives at the same time, thereby reducing the robbing incidence as each hive is working the source not another hive.
2. The feeder is placed some distance from the bee yard (hives) so that the bees see it as a nectar source, mimicking foraging.
3. It is easier to check and refill the feeders without disturbing the hives.
4. It works even during dearths when robbing is more of probability because of #1 & #2.

I use inverted gallon paint cans or large jars with holes poked in the lids so the bees have to take the syrup as if foraging.  If I were to feed my hives at the moment I would set up my feeding station at the edge of the blackberry vines that grow at one end of the pasture. 
the further the feeding station from the bees the better it works and the more it mimics actual foraging the better it works.
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Joelel
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« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2009, 12:42:14 AM »

Natalie,   Sorry for all the trouble this thread caused,  wasn't trying to accomplish all that.  I did mix up some sugar and water,  a little better than 1 to 1 and I put it in an old chick waterer.  I put rocks down in the resevoir so the bee's have something to stand on.  They seem to realy love it.  It is closer to the hive than most people say is good but I have not seen anyother bee's around it so far.  I went out there this evening and maybe 50 bees were in there drinking away.  I had to squeeze the bottle part to get more syrup out.  I think maybe it is to thick to flow out on it's own?  Anyway the bee's are gobbling it up right now.  This is a small swarm that came to my orchard and hung on one of my trees.  I first put them in a deep brood box that I had borrowed that had some drawn comb in it.  Then I bought another brood box from Dadent and put that on top after I saw they had put a lot of brood down in the first one.  They will have to draw comb in the new one as it just has the wood frames with Duragilt foundation.  I also bought two 6 and 5/8 inch supers.  Do you think two is enough in michigan?  I have seen some with three?  

Harvey,This thread didn't cause any trouble.On all forums you have some who like to jump on people because they don't like something someone says. Because I don't agree that sugar water is syrup and I say I do some things better then others and who knows what else,i get jumped on.So,this will never happen again with her or others.I have her on ignore and will put any others on ignore who jumps. I let her have last words and droped it. I still say watch your ourside feeder,if you start seeing dead bees around they are killing each other.You may not see any if yours are the only ones feeding there. Anyways do what works for you. Entrance feeding is not alot of work if you only feed your new hives.I am sorry this happened.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2009, 12:54:37 AM by Joelel » Logged

Acts2:37: Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles, Men and brethren, what shall we do?
38: Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.
39: For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call.
40: And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation
Bee Happy
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« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2009, 01:00:06 AM »

 tongue We're expecting a dearth in August, unless the afternoon rains finally kick in (they're late.  rolleyes ) otherwise, I took note of Brian's open feeding at a distance suggestion on another thread; and that's probably what I'll do. (built me a nice little gravity feeder from a 3L water bottle and a plastic coffee lid.)
I expect I'll mix 2 dihydrogen monoxide : 1 C12H22O11. but I don't imagine the bees will care what it's called.
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« Reply #30 on: July 16, 2009, 02:25:41 AM »

I've been searching the net and mostly I find feeding suggestions of various ratios of sugar:water mixtures. If I could take this thread in a slightly different direction, I'm thinking that a sugar:water mixture is not very nutritionally sound in comparison to flower nectar that probably has many other trace compounds (minerals, vitamins, amino acids, proteins, and even pollen) in it. What I'd like to know is if anyone uses, or has heard of using, other additives to the sugar:water mixture. I've only found one so far and that suggested adding sea salt as a mineral source, although no concentration was mentioned. I would assume that the amount of salt in the mixture would be quite small.  huh
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Natalie
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« Reply #31 on: July 16, 2009, 10:43:52 AM »

There has been discussion on this before so you may want to use the search function to look it up and see what has already been discussed since that will give you a start but I have never heard of anyone using sea salt.
I did once somewhere else about someone trying the salt, he also put it on the landing board for whatever reason, he thought it helped track it in and it would get absorbed. I didn't really get what he was trying to accomplish with that.
This topic usually causes a hot debate over the merits of sugar water vs nectar.
I think that the sugar water is fairly close to natural nectar when you break down the actual compounds but in any case its really only suppose to be fed if they are going to starve and its recommended to get a new package going.
Alot of people use honey b healthy syrup in their sugar water and I believe that the lemongrass oil in it attracts the bees to it and makes them take in more feed.
Some have tried herbal oils but I have read that you have to be careful any time you are adding anything to their feed that they are not usually exposed to in a natural setting.
I think Ross Conrad talks about the oils he uses or the herbal teas he uses in his book.
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AKs
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« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2009, 10:48:07 AM »

Thanks for the leads, Natalie. I'll keep searching. Smiley
AKs
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brynmawrbee
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« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2009, 10:54:55 AM »

  I did try and adjust the top cover today but it is stuck on.  I will need to pry it off. 

You need a hive tool.  That's the easiest way to pry everything apart without breaking anything.

Rachel
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