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Author Topic: Black bees?  (Read 788 times)
fermentedhiker
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« on: June 13, 2009, 10:22:16 PM »

I was enjoying watching my bees work my chives today.  It's actually been a real treat this year as my bees are hanging around and working a variety of plants on my property as opposed to last year when I hardly ever saw them unless I went to the hive itself.  But back to the point, while doing so I noticed some small black bees working the chives as well.  They are approximately the same size as my honeybees but are much quieter in flight.  I do have a russian queen and a russian/carnie queen, but in the inspections I did earlier today I never noticed any looking like these.  Anyone recognize them?  Some sort of native bee maybe?









I included a couple of pics with one of the bees from one of my hives for comparison.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2009, 06:49:05 AM »

Not sure the exact numbers, but there is something like over 1500 bee types in North America. They add newly found/discovered bees to the list yearly. Some individual bee types are specific to a particular area and some to just an isolated valley.

As for the type bee you see, I have no clue. Some of my masons get big about that size, but the bee in the picture looks more like a smaller version of the common bumblebee or "bore bee".
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2009, 01:30:26 AM »

Looks like a carpenter bee to me.
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beedad
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2009, 09:42:06 PM »

its a south eastern blueberry bee.  its the bees i was tracking in bangor.  theyre ground bees.
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doak
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2009, 09:57:10 PM »

Blue berry bee will do. also  known as the common bumble bee. not to be confused with the carpenter bee, which is larger.
Yes, a ground nesting bee which will build in ground cavities and also build in marsh or any other low growing grass. Also a social bee, which the carpenter bee is not. Meaning they live in colonies like honey bees do.
There is also a larger species that is larger than the carpenter bee, which nest in the same manner as the smaller one and is also a social bee. :)doak
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fermentedhiker
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2009, 10:37:53 PM »

thanks for the replies everyone.

Bjorn and Doak; It's definitely not a bumble bee
Brain; It's much smaller than any carpenter bees I've ever seen.  Doesn't mean it's not one, just one I haven't seen though.
Beedad; I don't think Habropoda laboriosa(the southeastern blueberry bee) has a range that extends this far north.

The bee in question appears to be in the family of Andrenid bees(digger or miner bees) which are similar to the southeastern blueberry bee both in appearance and life cycle.  I still haven't nailed down the specific species yet.
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